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Locarno International Film Festival

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    Exclusive: Watch the Trailer for Dominique Benicheti's Lost 1973 Doc 'Cousin Jules'

    Awarded the jury prize at the Locarno Film Festival in 1973, Dominique Benicheti's beloved documentary "Cousin Jules" has remained unreleased in the U.S. until now. Ahead of its first stateside theatrical run at New York's Film Forum, Indiewire is pleased to exclusively premiere the trailer for the ...

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    How Diversity Makes Difficult Movies Stand Out: Wrapping the Locarno Film Festival 2013

    Leave it to the Europeans to sprinkle prestige onto an already beloved movie. “Short Term 12” was an indie darling on the festival circuit before it went to Europe, winning the Grand Jury Prize at the SXSW Film Festival and gaining acclaim at other events around the country ahead of its release late...

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    Werner Herzog Meets Abel Ferrara And Talks Shop In Switzerland: 'I have done things I have never done before'

    Werner Herzog is having a productive week in Switzerland. For the duration of the Locarno Film Festival, which concludes its 66th edition on Sunday, Herzog has been the subject of a career retrospective that includes an outdoor screening of his profound jungle epic “Fitzcarraldo” as well as his most...

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    Locarno Film Festival Review: Home Movie Footage of Genocide Makes 'Pays Barbare' Essential Viewing`

    Redefining history in its own images, the remarkable hourlong found footage project "Pays Barbare" is less documentary than curated document. Longtime Italian avant garde directors Yervant Gianikian and Angela Ricci Lucchi ("From the Pole to the Equator") assemble material from a private archive cov...

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    Locarno Film Festival Review: Kiyoshi Kurosawa's 'Real' Wanders Through a Comatose Mind

    Japanese director Kiyoshi Kurosawa's "Real" features an ironic title. Like "Inception" or "The Matrix," the movie actively questions whether anything it depicts actually takes place. Set in a near-future where a technology called "sensing" allows people to step into the minds of comatose individuals...

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    Locarno Film Festival Review: Is 'Wetlands' the Most Disgusting Coming of Age Movie Of All Time?

    The first words to appear onscreen in “Wetlands,” director David Wnendt’s cheerfully profane adaptation of Charlotte Roche’s German-language bestseller, immediately engage with its controversy. "This book shouldn’t be adapted to a film," reads a quote from a letter to the editor.

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    Locarno Film Festival Review: Stunning Documentary 'Manakamana' Is the Must-See Cinematic Experience of the Year

    The camera-wielding researchers at Harvard's Sensory Ethnography Lab, an eccentric team responsible for experimental documentaries like last year's groundbreaking fishing-boat portrait "Leviathan" and the shepherd-focused "Sweetgrass," typically refuse to identify as "filmmakers" in the traditional ...

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    Locarno Film Festival Review: Dracula Meets Casanova In Albert Serra's Bizarrely Fascinating 'The Story of My Death'

    The title of Spanish director Albert Serra's four feature, "The Story of My Death," presents a sardonic riff on 18th century Italian Renaissance man Giacomo Casanova. His memoir, "Story of My Life," recounts his lively travels across Europe and encounters with fellow luminaries of his era like Volta...

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    Locarno Film Festival Review: 'The Strange Color Your Body's Tears,' From the Directors of 'Amer,' Is An Uneasy Assault On the Senses

    A loud, visually assaultive assemblage of genre tropes as technically accomplished as it is difficult to watch, "The Strange Color of Your Body's Tears" has plenty to impress while simultaneously offering so little. The movie depicts the Kafkaesque experiences of a baffled man seemingly trapped in h...

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    Locarno Film Festival Review: Joanna Hogg's 'Exhibition' Suggests Michael Haneke By Way of Miranda July

    Joanna Hogg's "Exhibition" closes with a dedication to architect James Melvin, an appropriate coda whether or not viewers recognize the name. Hogg's third feature magnifies the relationship between people and the spaces they live in with a keen eye for the way the two tend to blend together. At its ...

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