Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...
Celebrating 17 Years of Film.Biz.Fans.

Toronto International Film Festival

  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    15

    TIFF Futures: 'Wasteland' Director Rowan Athale On Why His Film is a British 'Ocean's Eleven'

    Whether it was the family-oriented films that his mother had pre-approved or the action flicks that his father snuck into the VCR, Rowan Athale loved the cinema. As the years passed and he grew and matured, so did his relationship with film. Gone were the days when he would simply watch commercials,...

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    28

    Helen Hunt Talks Baring All in 'The Sessions': "It's getting too late in my life to care about the small things."

    At Sundance this January, Academy Award-winner Helen Hunt courted the most attention she's received in over a decade for her brave and baring turn as a sex surrogate in "The Sessions" (then titled "The Surrogate").

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    7

    TIFF Capsule Review: 'Fill the Void'

    In the ultra-orthodox world of Jerusalem, Shira is 18 and plays the accordion in a kindergarten, and her family wants her to marry. She and her mother have their eyes on a handsome young man, but things get complicated when her older sister, Esther, dies in childbirth, and Esther’s husband, solemn, bearded Yochay, the father of a new baby, becomes the next eligible man. Director Rama Burshtein, the first woman from a Hasidic background to make a feature film, views Shira’s predicament from inside a religious community. Unlike the exposures of abuse and oppression that can be found in recent documentaries about women forced by o...

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    10

    TIFF Capsule Review: 'Thanks for Sharing'

    The directorial debut by "The Kids Are All Right" co-writer Stuart Blumberg, this ambitious comedy-drama about three men coping with sex addiction hits notes all the way up and down the scale. Often effective if inevitably erratic, the result finds room for everything from broad comedy to moments that strive for the darkness of "Shame," Steve McQueen’s far more severe take on the same subject. Mark Ruffalo gets the meatiest of the three central stories as Adam, a Manhattanite whose firm hold on his personal demons is tested when he falls for Phoebe (Gwyneth Paltrow), a woman who doesn’t know about his past. ...

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    6 comments
    tweet
    0

    Toronto Review: Juan Antonio Bayona's 'The Impossible' Is an Intense Realization of the 2004 Tsunami at Odds With Overstated Sentimentalism

    Bringing a blockbuster vision to a large scale disaster that demands it, Juan Antonio Bayona's "The Impossible" delivers a visceral treatment of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami only hampered by the overwrought sentimentalism of the survival tale at its center.

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    1 comment
    tweet
    18

    TIFF Futures: Josh Boone Gets Personal With His Debut 'Writers,' Starring Greg Kinnear and Jennifer Connelly

    Having spent the majority of his childhood making movies on home video with his friends, first-time director Josh Boone is more than comfortable behind a camera.

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    13 comments
    tweet
    0

    Toronto Review: Joss Whedon Turns Shakespeare Into an Airy Comedy With Lightweight 'Much Ado About Nothing'

    There's a certain irony to Joss Whedon's adaptation of "Much Ado About Nothing": While the script culls a beloved literary achievement more than 400 years old, it has relatively uncomplicated aims.

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    28

    TIFF Capsule Review: 'The Lebanese Rocket Society'

    Before the United States went to the moon, Lebanon had a space program. OK, what’s the punchline? This prodigiously researched film reminds you that the most improbable documentaries are often inspired by facts that you can’t make up.

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    7

    TIFF Capsule Review: 'Hannah Arendt'

    "Hannah Arendt" looks through a narrow window at the early 1960’s, when the German-born Jewish philosophy professor drew controversial conclusions in her 1963 New Yorker coverage of the Adolf Eichmann trial in Jerusalem. Arendt concluded that Eichmann, the runaway former Nazi official whom the Israelis kidnapped in Argentina in 1960, represented the "banality of evil," the bureaucratic willingness to follow the most evil of orders. She also pointed out that Jewish leaders helped organize deportation of Jews for the Nazis. In Margarethe von Trotta’s period drama, filmed in the grey tones of the time, we see A...

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    3 comments
    tweet
    0

    Toronto Review: Making Light of Romantic Dysfunction, 'Silver Linings Playbook' Is David O. Russell's Funniest Film to Date

    David O. Russell's movies have always been lively affairs, but none maintain the same fluid comedic inspiration of "Silver Linings Playbook."

    Read More »

Latest Tweets


Follow us