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Toronto International Film Festival

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    Toronto Review: Does 'Once' Director John Carney's Melodic Keira Knightley Vehicle 'Can a Song Save Your Life?' Criticize the Music Industry Or Celebrate It?

    John Carney's low budget 2006 musical romance "Once" was a breakout hit that foregrounded the emotional complexities of its central lovers with delicate tunes. By contrast, "Can a Song Save Your Life?" -- which contains several high profile actors and landed a lucrative deal with The Weinstein Compa...

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    Is '12 Years a Slave' an Oscar Lock? Please Don't Ask.

    Writers talking up the best-picture chances of Steve McQueen's harrowing slavery drama are avoiding the hard questions it poses.

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  • The Playlist
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    Watch: New Trailers, Clips for TIFF Selections 'We Are The Best,' 'Art of the Steal,' 'Starred Up' & More

    Based off of the steady stream of crowd-pleasers, critical darlings, and uneven oddities that hit Toronto this past week, the Toronto International Film Festival could already be considered a runaway success. But an entire week more of cinematic gifts await, and we've got clips and trailers for a sl...

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    Toronto Review: Godfrey Reggio Celebrates 30 Years Since 'Koyaanisqatsi' With Extraordinary Philip Glass-Scored 'Visitors'

    Thirty years have passed since the release "Koyaanisqatsi," Godfrey Reggio's first installment in his memorably abstract Qatsi trilogy, which captured the complexity of civilization through a gripping rush of images aided by an equally potent Philip Glass score. While the power of that project hasn'...

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    Mia Wasikowska On Having Three Films at TIFF and Why She Stuck to Indies Following 'Alice in Wonderland'

    Ever since falling down the rabbit hole for Tim Burton in "Alice in Wonderland," Australian actress Mia Wasikowska has kept busy working for other singular filmmakers in films that couldn't be more dissimilar, appearing in everything from Cary Fukanaga's "Jane Eyre" adaption to Park Chan-wook's Engl...

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  • The Playlist
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    TIFF Review: Wild & Vulgar 'Dom Hemingway' Starring Jude Law

    "A man with no options suddenly has all the options in the world," goes the liquor-soaked advice of Dom Hemingway (Jude Law). And while he admits that he has no idea what that actually means, he nonetheless lives that credo to the fullest in Richard Shepard's wickedly wild and vulgar "Dom Hemingway....

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    Adèle Exarchopoulos Addresses the 'Blue is the Warmest Color' Daily Beast Controversy and the Film's Sex Scenes

    Relative newcomer Adèle Exarchopoulos was the belle of Cannes this year for her breakthrough and baring turn in "Blue is the Warmest Color." Her performance opposite Léa Seydoux as a teenager coming to grips with her homosexuality was so strong it caused the Jury, led by Steven Spielberg, to award t...

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  • The Playlist
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    TIFF Review: Nicole Holofcener's 'Enough Said' Starring James Gandolfini & Julia Louis-Dreyfus

    The one constant surprise about getting older is that the ongoing lesson you soon learn is that you'll never figure it all out. Whatever you seemed confident and sure about at twenty becomes more nuanced by thirty and by the time you're seeing forty on the horizon, what was important two decades ago...

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    Toronto Review: Eli Roth Brings Shock, But Few Surprises, to Gross-out Cannibal Tribute 'The Green Inferno'

    For horror fans, Eli Roth and cannibal movies both bring a set of expectations that are met by "The Green Inferno," modern shockmeister Roth's first feature since 2007's "Hostel II." The cannibal genre that came and went in the seventies and eighties was known less for the quality of filmmaking than...

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  • The Playlist
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    TIFF Review: Denis Villeneuve’s ‘Enemy’ Starring Jake Gyllenhaal Is A Haunting Look At Our Dark Desires

    At the risk of blatantly repeating ourselves, Jake Gyllenhaal and director Denis Villeneuve are on the cusp of a banner 2013 that is about to hit its crest. Their first-unveiled collaboration, the harrowing, Fincher-with-more-emotional-resonance crime thriller “Prisoners” has already bruised audienc...

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