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World Cinema

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    Venice prepares for film fest with Asian flavour

    Venice's Lido is a favorite venue for stars from Hollywood but as the red carpet is rolled out for this year's festival, the flavour is distinctly Asian, from a martial arts-themed opening to Japanese cartoons. And after a blunder-prone, overloaded 2004, organisers of the world's oldest cinema compe...

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    Dispatch From Brazil: Beyond the Violence, Two Small Production Companies Look For Connections With

    Looking at two of Brazil's biggest blockbusters of the decade, Fernando Meirelles' "City of God" and Hector Babenco's "Carandiru," one might be tempted to stereotype contemporary Brazilian cinema as extremely violent. Both "City of God" and "Carandiru" followed the desperate, dangerous lives of slum dwellers and prisoners and were praised for their truthful and vibrant portrayal of the illnesses of Brazilian society. "Violence is a subject that all Brazilian films have in common," says Geórgia Costa Araújo, who produced 2003's confrontational "Contra Todos" ("Up Against Them All"), "but now we want to explore more themes." Filmm...

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    Making "Volver," Pedro Almodovar's Online Diary

    A man comes up to me while I'm having breakfast in a bar. He tells me he's seen "Bad Education" three times. I thank him, as I normally do.

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    Brothers' Peepers: Gaël Morel's "Three Dancing Slaves"

    Andre Techiné's "Wild Reeds," still as urgently humane now as when it was released in 1995, has bestowed quite a legacy upon the new generation of French filmmaking. That film's psychosexual and political tangles have slowly but surely created tendrils that have reached all the way through an entire decade's worth of youth cinema. If Techiné's tender evocation of adolescent confusion and the growing social and moral awareness of a group of young friends in the early Sixties during the ongoing French-Algerian conflict had any sort of direct effect on the national cinema, it has been in its ability to pass on its spirit of rebelli...

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    "Nine Lives," "Fratricide" Among Numerous Winners At Locarno

    With nearly as many categories as there are days in the festival, over a dozen winners for the Locarno International Film Festival were announced Saturday, August 13, heaping kudos and cash prizes on outstanding films and their makers. Among them was Rodrigo Garcia's "Nine Lives," which garnered three awards including the International Competition's Golden Leopard. Yilmaz Arslan's "Fratricide" was another festival favorite, picking up the Silver Leopard while Nobuhiro Suwa's "Un Couple Parfait" earned the Special Jury Prize. The International Federation Film Societies' Don Quixote award went to Joana Hadjithomas and Khalil Joreige for "A Perf...

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    Asian Films Caught Between U.S. Distribs and DVD-Seeking Fans

    As Asian film fans know, Wong Kar Wai's sexy, sci-fi remembrance "2046" opened a couple of weeks ago in U.S. theaters, Park Chan-wook's "Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance," the first in his sick and twisted revenge trilogy, debuts in Los Angeles and New York theaters this Friday, and coming out in October,...

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    De La Iglesia's "El Crimen Perfecto" Set for U.S. Release

    Alex de la Iglesia's "El Crimen Perfecto" (Perfect Crime), formerly known as "El Crimen Ferpecto (Ferpect Crime), will kick-off its U.S. theatrical release later this week from Vitagraph Films. The film, from the director of "The Day of the Beast" and "Perdito Durango," is a black comedy that stars ...

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    Torture Chamber Drama: Park Chan-wook's "Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance"

    Quentin Tarantino doesn't make nearly enough movies. Thank heavens for Park Chan-wook. The first installment of Mr. Park's "Revenge Trilogy," "Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance," opens this week following, in reverse order, the surprise U.S. art-house success of his second entry in the series, "Oldboy." If...

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    National Geographic to Showcase Indigenous and Minority-Culture Film at All Roads Film Festival in D

    The work of indigenous and other "under-represented minority-culture filmmakers and photographers from around the world will be heralded at the upcoming All Roads Film Festival, taking place in Washington, D.C. and Los Angeles beginning in September. The four-day multimedia event will feature four e...

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    Strange Yet Cool: Listening to Wong Kar Wai...and Making Sense of "2046"

    Sitting in the front row of the Walter Reade Theater at Lincoln Center in June, a young woman from Hong Kong smiled broadly and shifted around in her seat excitedly, awaiting the start of a screening of "2046." We started chatting and I assumed from her enthusiasm that she had not yet seen the movie. Telling her that she was in for a real treat, I started to talk a bit about the movie. She politely admitted that she had already seen various versions of the film a half-dozen times, mostly on imported DVDs. On this particular night, because director Wong Kar Wai would be making an appearance to introduce the screening and participate in a Q&A a...

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