Black Orpheus

In Rio, Orfeo is a trolley conductor and musician, engaged to Mira. During Carnival week, he sees Eurydice, who’s fled her village in fear of a stalker; it’s love at first sight. Her cousin Sarafina, with whom she stays in Rio, is a friend of Orfeo and Mira, so the star-crossed lovers meet again. Later, during the revels, wearing Sarafina’s costume, Eurydice dances a provocative samba with Orfeo. Not only is Mira enraged when her rival is unmasked, but she is being stalked by Death: Eurydice is in danger, pursued through noisy crowds and a morgue. Can Orfeo conduct her to safety? Don’t look back.

The Given Word

Zé is a very poor man from the Brazilian countryside. His most prized possession is his donkey. When his donkey falls terminally ill, Zé makes a promise to Saint Bárbara: If his donkey recovers, he will carry a cross – like Jesus – all the way from his city to Saint Bárbara’s church in the state capital. Upon the recover of his donkey, Zé leaves on his journey. He makes it to the church, but the priest refuses to accept the cross once he came to know the context of Zé’s promise. Written by Manoel Mendonça


Clara, a 65 year old widow and retired music critic, was born into a wealthy and traditional family in Recife, Brazil. She is the last resident of the Aquarius, an original two-story building, built in the 1940s, in the upper-class, seaside Avenida Boa Viagem, Recife. All the neighboring apartments have already been acquired by a company which has other plans for that plot. Clara has pledged to only leave her place upon her death, and will engage in a cold war of sorts with the company, a confrontation which is both mysterious, frightening and nerve wracking. This tension both disturbs Clara and gives her that edge on her daily routine. It also gets her thinking about her loved ones, her past and her future. [Synopsis courtesy of Cannes Film Festival]

South of the Border

A road trip across five countries to explore the social and political movements as well as the mainstream media’s misperception of South America while interviewing seven of its elected presidents.


Rio in the forties was an oasis in a world fraught by war. Its star was Heleno de Freitas, (a stand-out performance by Rodrigo Santoro), a footballer, whose violent temper both on and off the pitch led to his decline in the late fifties. Shot in luminous black and white, José Henrique Fonseca’s latest feature film evokes Heleno’s glory days when he was king of Rio’s night and day, to his lonely end in a sanatorium due to untreated syphilis. [Synopsis courtesy of TIFF]

They’ll Come Back

Cris, aged 12, and her brother are left at the side of the road by their parents. The punishment quickly turns into an even greater challenge. Marcelo Lordello’s first feature film Eles voltam, which follows Cris in her attempts to find her way back home, is a modern-day fable through different realities guided by the people that inhabit them.

O Estranho Caso de Angelica

A magical tale about a young photographer who falls madly in love with a woman he can never have, except in his dreams. Late one night, Isaac is summoned by a wealthy family to take the last photograph of a young bride, Angelica, who mysteriously passed away. Arriving at their estate, Isaac is struck by Angelica’s beauty, but when he looks through his lens, something strange happens – the young woman appears to come to life. From that moment, Isaac will be haunted by Angelica day and night.

God’s Land

The movie follows Antonio as he witnesses the descent of common rural worker Manuel into a life of crime, joining the gang of Antonio’s sworn enemy, Corisco the Blond Devil (Othon Bastos), and the Pedra Bonita Massacre.


Handsome, fact-based historical drama “Xingu” from helmer Cao Hamburger (“The Year My Parents Went on Vacation”) is a stirring, broad-strokes account of the founding of Brazil’s Xingu National Park, a milestone in the recognition of rights for indigenous people, and of the legendary Villas-Boas brothers who made the creation of the park their mission.


A seasoned team of bank robbers, including Gordon Jennings (Idris Elba), John Rahway (Paul Walker), A.J. (Hayden Christensen), and brothers Jake (Michael Ealy) and Jesse Attica (Chris Brown) successfully complete their latest heist and lead a life of luxury while planning their next job. When Ghost (Tip T.I. Harris), a former member of their team, is released from prison he convinces the group to strike an armored car carrying $20 million. As the “Takers” carefully plot out their strategy and draw nearer to exacting the grand heist, a reckless police officer (Matt Dillon) inches closer to apprehending the criminals.

21 Jump Street

In high school, Schmidt was a dork and Jenko was the popular jock. After graduation, both of them joined the police force and ended up as partners riding bicycles in the city park. Since they are young and look like high school students, they are assigned to an undercover unit to infiltrate a drug ring that is supplying high school students synthetic drugs.

Letters to God

A young boy fighting cancer writes letters to God, touching lives in his neighborhood and inspiring hope among everyone he comes in contact. An unsuspecting substitute postman, with a troubled life of his own, becomes entangled in the boy’s journey and his family by reading the letters. They inspire him to seek a better life for himself and his own son he’s lost through his alcohol addiction.