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    REVIEW | From The Heart: Rodrigo Garcia's "Mother and Child"

    EDITOR'S NOTE: This review was originally published as part of indieWIRE's coverage of the Toronto International Film Festival. "Mother and Child" hits theaters in limited release this Friday.

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    REVIEW | For the Love of Trash, Korine's "Humpers" Fetes the Freak

    EDITOR'S NOTE: This review was originally published as part of indieWIRE's coverage of the Toronto International Film Festival. "Trash Humpers" hits theaters in limited release this Friday.

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    REVIEW | Cute and Shallow: Thomas Balmes's "Babies"

    The celebration of new life in "Babies," a documentary about four newborns around the world, almost makes the project worthwhile -- but not quite. French director Thomas Balmes dives right into his virtually wordless cycle of cross-cutting with hardly any introduction, instead favoring the collage a...

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    TRIBECA REVIEW | Movies Within a Movie: The Anthology Documentary "Freakonomics"

    Equal parts journalistic exposé and targeted anthropological dissection, the slick anthology production "Freakonomics" makes heavy ideas go down easy. That's the point, of course: Based on Steven Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner's bestselling 2005 tome, the movie explores "the hidden side of everything"...

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    TRIBECA REVIEW | Sexual Innocence: Ashley Horner's "brilliantlove"

    The sexuality in "brilliantlove," in which a couple's private lovemaking photos go public, creates a simultaneously frank and disarmingly innocent experience. An explicit British drama competently directed by Ashley Horner, the movie revolves around Manchester (Liam Browne) and Noon (Nancy Trotter L...

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    VOD Review: 'Shawshank' With Teens? Kim Chapiron's 'Dog Pound' Finds Turmoil In Youth Prison

    The opening moments of "Dog Pound" introduce its young subjects in a frenzy of violent acts: Suave 16-year-old Davis (Shane Kippel) gets nabbed by the cops for pushing pills; 15-year-old Angel (Mateo Morales) goes down for assault and auto theft; hot-headed Butch (Adam Butcher) beats up a correction...

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    Big Screen | Holofcener and a "Human Centipede" Lead Debuts

    Both among early-in-the-season picks on indieWIRE's summer movie preview, there might not be a more inappropriate double feature than Nicole Holofcener's "Please Give" and Tom Six's "The Human Centipede." One is a light-hearted morality tale about a bunch of inter-connected New Yorkers negotiating t...

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    TRIBECA REVIEW | Religious Rebels: "Sons of Perdition"

    The Mormon outcasts at the center of "Sons of Perdition," a documentary directed by Tyler Meason and Jennilyn Merten, bring authenticity to a sensationalist hook. The polygamous community of the "Crick," a Fundamentalist Latter-Day Saints (FLDS) enclave run by the dictatorial Warren Jeffs until his ...

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    TRIBECA REVIEW | Non-Fiction Innovation: Clio Barnard's "The Arbor"

    Documentaries often toy with the conventions of non-fiction storytelling to the detriment of their content, but Clio Barnard's innovative "The Arbor" provides a welcome exception to the norm. Tracking the experiences of British playwright Andrea Dunbar and her children, Barnard uses actors to lip-sy...

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    TRIBECA REVIEW | The Subtext of Longing: Lee Isaac Chung's "Lucky Life"

    During one of many understated scenes in Lee Isaac Chung’s “Lucky Life,” a character expresses the desire for “a chance to slow down a bit more,” and his friend concurs. Such an abstract wish could serve as the tagline for Chung’s meditative, lyrical and yet hauntingly familiar look at the elusive n...

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