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    REVIEW | Paint by Numbers: Milos Forman's "Goya's Ghosts"

    "Goya's Ghosts" is half what one expects from Milos Forman. As in "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest," "Amadeus," "The People vs. Larry Flynt," and "Man on the Moon," its protagonist is a daring iconoclast who stands intrepid against the uncomprehending conventionalists of his time. But it significant...

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    REVIEW | The Bad Touch: Kim Ki-duk's "Time"

    "Time," the thirteenth film by that most disposable of Asian auteurs, Kim Ki-duk, should finally, definitively, expose the filmmaker's patented layering of ambiguities as nothing more than the tawdry covering-up of an empty imagination. As if the indignity of "3-Iron," with its ridiculous descent i...

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    REVIEW | A Town Burned Down: Michael Arias's "Tekkonkinkreet"

    "Tekkonkinkreet" is the tale of two young brothers, one named "Black" and the other "White," and the thematics underlying the Japanese anime by first-time American director Michael Arias couldn't be more plainspoken. A classic, cosmic battle between good and evil playing out within the soul of the ...

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    REVIEW | With Friends Like This...: Patrice Leconte's "My Best Friend"

    The latest incoming shipment in the modest import business of innocuously predictable French screen farces, Patrice Leconte's "My Best Friend" caters to that conservative audience who seek shelter under the implicit sophistication of subtitle, and who are still not acclimated to the blithe transgres...

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    REVIEW | Hide and Seek: Steve Buscemi's "Interview"

    Those who know that Steve Buscemi's new film, "Interview" is a remake of a 2003 film of the same name by Dutch filmmaker Theo Van Gogh, who was brutally murdered in 2004 by a militant Islamist for his outspoken condemnation of Muslim treatment of women, may be surprised by how commonplace the film i...

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    REVIEW | Shrill Life: Cherie Nowlan's "Introducing the Dwights"

    A first impression of the titular family in Cherie Nowlan's "Introducing the Dwights" (formerly known as "Clubland") has one imagining the film will be a sunny, Aussie-style quirkfest in the vanilla vein of many a Sundance flick. When his new girlfriend, Jill (Emma Booth), asks about meeting the pa...

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    REVIEW | Body Contact: Pascal Arnold and Jean-Marc Barr's "One to Another"

    There's an ever more prevalent, if still marginalized, subgenre in international films today that is difficult to classify. In such films as Larry Clark's "Bully" and Gael Morel's "Le Clan" (released here as "Three Dancing Slaves"), groups of teenagers descend into violent oblivion while the filmmak...

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    REVIEW | Zero for Conduct: Fredi M. Murer's "Vitus"

    Of the thin trickle of foreign films that ever see proper U.S. release, the "subtitled moppets" subgenre seems to me the most superfluous - and when a film like Switzerland's "Vitus" comes along, press kit boasting an Antoine de Saint-Exupery quote on the cover, one can only prepare to be cloyed to ...

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    REVIEW | The Lower Depths: Asger Leth's "Ghosts of Cite Soleil"

    "Rap music influenced them people deep over there; they will live by it and they will die by it. And it ain't no Hollywood movie, it's the truth." So says Haitian-American musician Wyclef Jean, speaking on the street-level reality in Cite Soleil, a shantytown outside Port-au-Prince, and the central ...

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    REVIEW | Prognosis: Dire, Michael Moore's "Sicko"

    After announcing itself with the requisite George W. Bush-as-incoherent-idiot sound bite, Michael Moore's "SiCKO" officially begins with a close-up of an unhealed wound. From that point on, Moore will train his camera on countless gashes and sores, most of them psychological, all of which hit the vi...

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