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Movie Reviews

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    A "Woman" of No Importance: Mike Barker's "A Good Woman"

    "A Good Woman," the original title of Oscar Wilde's 1892 play "Lady Windermere's Fan," is a film about the same characters we've met in the play's previous incarnations, only this time many of them are Americans and they're on the shores of the Italian Riviera in 1930. This shuffle of accents, cost...

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    The Dead Zone: Eugene Jarecki's "Why We Fight"

    Documentaries like Eugene Jarecki's Sundance Grand Jury Prize-winning "Why We Fight" put me in two frames of mind. On the one hand, its staid and steady by-the-PBS-book blend of talking heads, archival footage, and recent news clips makes one ponder the necessity of a theatrical release. On the oth...

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    Reverse Shot's 11 Annoyances of 2005

    How we hated them. So much that we can't stop talking about them. Certainly our second annual list of the most obnoxious experiences we had in 2005 watching ostensibly our favorite art form could come across as nothing more than a mean-spirited endeavor, but keep in mind that some of these titles se...

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    Reverse Shot's Best of '05: "Kings & Queen" and 9 More

    A grab bag of 2004 festival faves just getting "wider" releases. Misunderstood studio experiments. Inventive indie charmers. It becomes increasingly ridiculous to try and separate one year's best-of list from the next in any sort of edifying ideological, spiritual, or political manner, as the dispar...

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    A History of Reference: Woody Allen's "Match Point"

    There are those who will take the opportunity to elevate "Match Point" to instant classic status and those who will damn it with faint praise -- yet both will do so by saying the same thing: "Woody Allen's best in years!" Never mind that Allen stands utterly alone in output quantity, and that approx...

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    A View to a Kill: Michael Haneke's "Cache"

    Shock the bourgeois. That rallying cry of early 20th Century European art and art cinema -- apres Baudelaire -- becomes less effective as each passing year pulls us further from the canonized abrasions of modernity and deeper into the postmodern neutralization of visceral, disarming violence. In ret...

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    Dead Man Riding: Tommy Lee Jones' "The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada"

    This season's other cowboy bonding pic, Tommy Lee Jones' spare, deeply warped theatrical directorial debut may not be as socially radical and ultimately important as "Brokeback Mountain." But in all other respects (structure, dialogue, and detail) it's "The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada," with...

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    Don't Fence Me In: Ang Lee's "Brokeback Mountain"

    Even on the eve of "Brokeback Mountain"'s release, it's difficult to separate the actual movie onscreen from the media attention that's been swirling around it for months. Is Ang Lee's effective tragic romance to be viewed as just another epic love story unfolding under a panoramic azure sky or as a...

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    Video Drone: Takashi Shimizu's "Marebito"

    "By looking at her through the lens," explains cameraman and obsessive voyeur Masuoka (Shinya Tsukamoto), speaking of a mysterious woman he films from his apartment building, "I believe that I've salvaged her soul." But Masuoka wants to accomplish even greater, and more disturbing, metaphysical feat...

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    A Schlock to the System: Laurence Dunmore's "The Libertine"

    Laurence Dunmore's film "The Libertine" sketches the glory days and final detumescence of John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester, the notorious Restoration wit and rakehell who wrote highly allusive poems, some sexually explicit, others philosophical, many a vexing combination. Based upon the play by Stuart...

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