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Movie Reviews

  • Leonard Maltin
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    LEE MARVIN: POINT BLANK by Dwayne Epstein (Schaffner Press)

    Dwayne Epstein may not have intended to spend nearly twenty years working on a biography of Lee Marvin, but had he not started in the mid-1990s he would have missed the opportunity of interviewing the actor’s older brother, many of his directors (from Sam Fuller to John Frankenheimer), and an even g...

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  • Indiewire
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    Review: Derek Cianfrance's 'The Place Beyond the Pines' Is Sad, Powerful and Strengthened By Ryan Gosling and Bradley Cooper

    Derek Cianfrance's sophomore feature "Blue Valentine" was a tender actors' showcase that played loose with its timeline to explore the ups and down of a relationship. The director's latest effort, "The Place Beyond the Pines," contains a far more ambitious structure that covers four overlapping char...

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  • Indiewire
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    From 'Trance' to 'Spring Breakers,' Is This the Golden Age of Film Noir?

    Technically speaking, film noir's heyday ended when fedoras and chain smoking were still chic without irony. However, the qualities that made noir distinctive suggest that its spirit is more alive in new movies than ever before.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    'Trance' Director Danny Boyle Channels Evil Side with Naked Femme Fatale: Exclusive Interview, Early Reviews

    "Trance" is stylish escapist fun that makes excellent use of reflective surfaces including the iPad, among other visual tricks--when it isn't pummeling you into submission. Boyle isn't one to sit back and let you feel calm and relaxed. Early reviews by trade critics claim that style trumps substance...

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  • Leonard Maltin
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    THE SAPPHIRES

    I can’t imagine anyone concocting a movie about four Aboriginal girls entertaining American troops in Vietnam in the late 1960s unless it were based on a true story.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Weekend Preview: Bright, Exuberant 'Sapphires' and Stylish 'Gimme the Loot' Best Bets, 'Admission' Not Making the Grade

    The Weinsteins' ebullient backstage musical "The Sapphires," which chronicles the success of an all-girl Aboriginal band out of Australia in the 1960s and boasts a break-out performance from Irish star-on-the-rise Chris O'Dowd, and Adam Leon's SXSW and Cannes entry "Gimme the Loot," a well-shot love...

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  • The Playlist
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    Review: 'Dorfman In Love' A Painful Comedy Not Worth Falling For

    Though it seems unlikely, someone this weekend is going to be dragged to see “Dorfman In Love.” Forget about the film for a second: who is this person, and what have they done to deserve this? Is he or she bad? Isn’t there a cheaper way to dole out punishment then paying arthouse ticket prices for a...

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  • The Playlist
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    Review: Chris O'Dowd Shines In The Otherwise Uneven 'The Sapphires'

    Among the The Weinstein Company's acquisitions prior to the 2012 Cannes Film Festival was the largely unknown (until it was bought) Aussie musical/drama/comedy effort "The Sapphires." It's certainly easy to see why this easy-to-digest, feel-good movie earned their attention. With a slate last year t...

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  • Women and Hollywood
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    Admission Gives Us Some Real Feminism On Screen

    Comedies today seem to always go for the broadest, raunchiest laughs. The audience is not trusted to get the comedic nuances in everyday life. That is not the case with the new film Admission written by Karen Croner, directed by Paul Weitz and based on the book by Jean Hanff Korelitz.

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  • The Playlist
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    Review: 'My Brother The Devil' A Fresh & Exciting Take On The Familiar Urban Crime Drama

    British urban drama is fast becoming a crowded genre. It seems that every couple of months there’s a movie released depicting issues of drug abuse, violence and poverty in the council estates of one of London’s many recession hit suburbs. Well, in UK cinemas that is. Not many make it out of the coun...

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