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Movie Reviews

  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    This Weekend: Strong Indies Abound with 'Mother of George,' 'Wadjda,' 'Blue Caprice' and 'Harry Dean Stanton' Doc

    As TIFF moves into its closing weekend, a number of strongly reviewed indie films hit theaters. Four titles -- "Mother of George," "Wadjda," "Blue Caprice" and "Harry Dean Stanton: Partly Fiction" -- are sitting with impressive Tomatometer scores of over 90%.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    TIFF Review: Pirjo Honkasalo's 'Concrete Night' One of the Most Gorgeous Films at Toronto (TRAILER)

    Included in the Toronto Film Festival’s “Masters” selection -- and for very good reason -- “Concrete Night” marks the return of the Finnish filmmaker Pirjo Honkasalo (“The Three Rooms of Melancholia”) to the realm of fiction for the first time since 1998, with a story that explores the poverty of th...

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  • ReelPolitik
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    "Informant": How Brandon Darby Went from Anarchist to F.B.I. Stool-pigeon

    One of the best political documentaries last year, "Better This World" examines the government's crackdowns on civil disobedience, the ubiquity of surveillance and the injustice of our justice system. One of the most compelling characters in that taut, tense story of two boyhood friends who go fr...

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Toronto Film Festival: Movies About Fat People

    The generously proportioned, so to speak, are having a moment in the autumnal sun, courtesy of the Toronto Film Festival, where the subject of fat people is kinda blowing up, in a medium that usually promotes the idea that eating is sinning, and that any worthwhile woman can be outweighed by her han...

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  • Indiewire
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    Toronto: How 'Philomena' and 'A Field in England' Represent Two Tendencies In British Cinema

    Two British films, "A Field in England" and "Philomena" (both playing at the Toronto Film Festival), use comedy to depict real historical events. While they couldn't be more different from each other, together they demonstrate the great and many traditions of British comedy.

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  • Indiewire
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    Toronto Review: Inexplicably Wacky Ratings Satire 'R100,' From Hitoshi Matsumoto, Is Like 'Fight Club' Directed By Luis Buñuel

    Japanese comedian Hitoshi Matusmoto successfully made the leap to writer-director-star with his 2007 debut "Big Man Japan," a zany take on the superhero genre that simultaneously managed to make its fantastical protagonist human. The unlikely combination of surrealism and pathos would continue to de...

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  • Leonard Maltin
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    Touchy Feely

    I like many qualities of Lynn Shelton’s work ("Humpday," "Your Sister’s Sister") and her latest, low-key effort has particular promise because it has such a strong, well-chosen cast,

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  • The Playlist
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    Review: 'And While We Were Here' Delivers The Sensuality Of The Sun-Kissed Shores Of Naples

    Harkening back to Italian neo-realism, the romance of Naples is alive in "And While We Were Here," the latest film from writer-director Kat Coiro. Considerably more watchable than her pratfall-driven debut "L!fe Happens," the picture is significantly more sober-minded, concerning the marriage of pre...

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  • The Playlist
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    Review: Saudi Arabian Film 'Wadjda' Is A Phenomenal Debut From An Exciting New Talent

    The cinematic revolution in the Middle East over the last few decades, led principally by a generation of Iranian filmmakers who've flourished creatively despite restrictions placed on them by the regime, hasn't necessarily carried over to every region. Saudi Arabia, for instance, is hardly known fo...

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  • Indiewire
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    Toronto Review: Why 'Joe' Is a Comeback For Both Nicolas Cage and David Gordon Green

    A dozen years ago, Nicolas Cage was still considered a serious actor and David Gordon Green was considered a promising new filmmaker. A few years later, both of their reputations shifted dramatically: Cage became the butt of countless jokes about his overacting in subpar genre efforts and Green took...

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