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Movie Reviews

  • The Playlist
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    Tribeca Review: 'Persepolis' Follow-Up 'Chicken With Plums' Is Amiable & Pretty, But Twee & Thin

    It can be difficult to shift from animation to live-action direction; the processes are very different, and even an accomplished animation helmer can sometimes be undone once they're faced with cameras, actors and the breakneck schedule of a feature film shoot, as opposed to the multi-year process t...

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  • Indiewire
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    TRIBECA REVIEW: Why Bradley Rust Grey's 'Jack & Diane' Isn't the Lesbian Werewolf Extravaganza You Hoped For

    Hyped for years as a whimsical project to watch, "Jack and Diane" never finds a coherent hook and instead drowns itself in atmosphere, a danger Gray's earlier films managed to avoid.

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  • Shadow and Act
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    Tribeca Review "Booker's Place: A Mississippi Story:" Heartbreaking Tale Of Good Old-Fashioned American Racial Intolerance

    Making its premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival which is currently in full swing, and was recently acquired by Tribeca Film for simultaneous VOD/theatrical release this week is the feature documentary Booker's Place: A Mississippi Story - a penetrating, truly heartbreaking film about good ...

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  • The Playlist
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    Tribeca Review: The Deeply Insufferable 'Giant Mechanical Man' Is Quintessential Indie Film Hell

    There’s a special sort of Hell where films like “The Giant Mechanical Man” play, with the same ideas and tropes repeated around the clock, with the mistaken assumption that they’re endearing or, even worse, adorable. It’s the sort of picture that gives independent films a bad name, the type of film ...

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    Now and Then: Old-School Horror Is All in Your Head

    The most innovative thing about writer-director Ti West's "The Innkeepers" (on DVD today) is how low-fi it plays. The gore is minimal, the music restrained, the body count limited. Call it the rebirth of the classic American horror picture.

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  • The Playlist
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    Tribeca Review: ESPN Doc ‘Benji’ Is A Tragic Portrait Of Promising Hoop Dreams Unfulfilled

    Something that all hardcore sports fans, but cinephiles may not be fully aware of: ESPN’s “30 For 30” series of documentaries on various touchstone moments in sports history are all by and large, riveting and dramatic pieces of work worth watching regardless if you’re a sports fan are not. While tha...

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  • The Playlist
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    SFIFF Review: 'The Fourth Dimension' A Mostly Humorous Collection Of Shorts With Harmony Korine's Most Comically Focused Effort To Date

    Last Friday night, the San Francisco International Film Festival hosted the world premiere of “The Fourth Dimension,” a production born out of a partnership between Vice Films and Grolsch Film Works.

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  • Thompson on Hollywood
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    SFIFF Review: World Premiere of Terrorist-Savvy 'Informant'

    "Informant" has timing on its side. The documentary by Jamie Meltzer, told mostly in the voice of Brandon Darby, is an activist’s journey from the post-Katrina ruins of New Orleans, to Venezuela and Colombia, and back the United States, where Darby sours on his former comrades and ends up working fo...

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  • Leonard Maltin
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    Under The Radar: A Kiwi Western And A Jazz Doc

    Some movies open “wide,” on thousands of screens; others play in just a handful of theaters. And some films, lacking promotion or advertising budgets, simply materialize, with the hope that people will discover them On Demand, or cable, or DVD, like a sleeper from New Zealand I was lucky...

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  • The Playlist
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    Tribeca Review: 'Freaky Deaky' Is A 1970s-Set Farce Where The Afros Outnumber The Laughs

    Just when you thought filmmakers had milked every gag possible from setting a movie in the 1970s, along comes writer/director Charles Matthau to prove that theory correct in the moribund Elmore Leonard adaptation “Freaky Deaky.” Though the source material takes place in 1988, Matthau hea...

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