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Movie Reviews

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    Critical Consensus: Woody's Cannes Opener "Paris" Is The Pick of a (Slow) Week

    As Cannes closes down its 2011 edition in the south of France, its opener is debuting Stateside. Woody Allen's "Midnight in Paris" is opening in limited release this weekend care of Sony Pictures Classics, and alongside Greg Jacobs and Jon Siskel's doc "Louder Than a Bomb" and Sundance 2010 alum "L...

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    CANNES REVIEW | Aki Kaurismaki's "Le Havre" Is a Deadpan Delight

    With its bouncy soundtrack, deadpan humor and good-natured disposition, Finnish director Aki Kaurismaki's "Le Havre" is an endearing affair. Combining his clownish storytelling with a life-affirming plot, Kaurismaki churns a fundamental scenario through his own unique narrative te...

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    CANNES REVIEW | Jailed Iranian Filmmaker Mohammad Rasoulof Delivers An Indictment With "Goodbye"

    With his fifth feature, "Goodbye," jailed Iranian filmmaker Mohammad Rasoulof delivers a suspenseful and moving portrait of modern censorship in the country that has currently placed him in its governmental crosshairs. Along with fellow Iranian filmmaker Jafar Panahi, Rasoulof has been sentenced to ...

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    Small Screens: indieWIRE's Top 5 Releases This Week

    This week Brad Anderson's ("The Machinist") latest creeps onto DVD/Blu-ray, a French classic thriller gets the Criterion treatment, a terrifying one-shot wonder hits VOD and a bunch of Pakistani slackers grow up the hard way.

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    CANNES REVIEW | Terrence Malick's "The Tree of Life" Is A Visually Astounding Achievement

    More meditation than movie, Terrence Malick's "The Tree of Life" is bound to mystify, awe and exasperate in equal measures. Another profoundly inspired and visually scrumptious multi-year production from the reclusive filmmaker, Malick's fifth feature in a career that spans three decades contains hi...

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    CANNES REVIEW | Jonathan Caouette Returns With Flawed But Fascinating "Walk Away Renée"

    When "Tarnation"--Jonathan Caouette's non-fiction account of his troubled family life--made the festival rounds in 2003, it was considered a cinematic revelation. Famously putting the whole thing together in iMovie, he assembled a collage of photo albums, home movies, voicemails and other fragmentar...

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    REVIEW | "The Artist" Pays Homage to the Silent Era, But Visuals Dominate Story

    The concept driving "The Artist," a silent, black-and-white feature designed to imitate 1920's Hollywood productions, is more commendable than its execution. Michel Hazanavicius steps beyond the self-conscious parody of his two "OSS 117" films for a bittersweet homage to...

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    CANNES REVIEW | In "Arirang," Kim Ki-duk Turns the Camera on Himself

    South Korean director Kim Ki-duk has made 15 features in the same number of years. For his sixteenth, "Arirang," he turns the camera on himself to examine that timeline. A first-person therapy session of sorts, Kim's upfront treatise on his life's unusual trajectory is alternatively beautiful, frust...

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    CANNES REVIEW | "Footnote" Finds the Comedy in a Talmudic Feud

    Israeli writer-director Joseph Cedar's last feature, the Oscar-nominated "Beaufort," was a tense war movie about the 2000 South Lebanon conflict. His latest effort, "Footnote," involves a much more personal war, in which the opposing sides are a father and his grown son. In Cedar's dark comic fable,...

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    CANNES REVIEW | "The Kid With a Bike" at Once New and Too Familiar

    Something that, on the surface, looks startlingly new, slowly reveals itself to be something surprisingly familiar and not all that effective in the latest film from the Belgian brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne. Their Cannes competition film “The Kid With a Bike” is the arthous...

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