Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...
Celebrating 17 Years of Film.Biz.Fans.

Movie Reviews

  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    REVIEW | Old Joy: Stephen Walker's "Young @ Heart"

    Can rock music and colostomy bags mix? (Insert your own hilarious "Shine a Light" joke here.) The subject of Stephen Walker's new documentary is Farmingham, Massachusetts' "Young @ Heart" chorus, a 24-member group with several international tours under its belt. The singers' median age, we're inform...

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    REVIEW | Such Great Heights: Hou Hsiao-hsien's "The Flight of the Red Balloon"

    Like his 2004 film "Cafe Lumiere," Hou Hsiao-hsien's sublime new movie "The Flight of the Red Balloon" finds the director in a foreign country paying homage to another filmmaker. With "Lumiere," Yasujiro Ozu was Hou's reference point and Tokyo his canvas; here, Hou reimagines Albert Lamorisse's classic 1956 short "The Red Balloon" as a Parisian family melodrama. Hou's film, much like Lamorisse's, opens with the magnificent titular object hovering barely out of the reach of seven-year-old Simon (Simon Iteanu); as he gets on the Metro, it floats just above the station, drifting up into the trees. The balloon, and by proxy Lamorisse's film, serv...

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    REVIEW | Tuckered Out: David Schwimmer's "Run Fatboy Run"

    Since the "chick flick" moniker continues to stick, it's only fair that male-targeted incarnations of the romantic comedy receive an equally derogatory nickname now that they're all the rage. I nominate "dick flicks" over David Denby's more diplomatic "slacker striver romance" designation -- certainly the subgenre's preoccupation with penis jokes earns the label. As outlined by the New Yorker critic in an article last year heralding the crop's crystallization with "Knocked Up," the flicks typically focus on an unmotivated and immature man as he kicks and screams his way towards reformation for the love of a good (and hot) woman. "Run Fatbo...

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    1 comment
    tweet
    0

    REVIEW | Wistful Thinking: Morgan Neville's "The Cool School"

    "The Cool School" is one of a subset of documentary biographies that might best be called "Scenes of Yesteryear." Like the recent "Weather Underground," "Commune," and "American Hardcore"--whose respective subjects include radical terrorists, hippie collectives, and indigenous, anticommercial punk r...

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    1 comment
    tweet
    0

    REVIEW | Family Feud: Jeff Nichols's 'Shotgun Stories"

    The presence of David Gordon Green's name in "Shotgun Stories"' billing block is probably both a blessing and a curse for the reception of Jeff Nichols's feature film debut. On the one hand, it broadcasts what sort of film this is -- an earnest character study with a touch of that neo-Southern Gothi...

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    REVIEW | Gross National Product: Olivier Assayas's "Boarding Gate"

    Olivier Assayas's "Boarding Gate" arrives on these shores like a battered shipment of cheap goods. True, it's only sat moldering for ten months in its film canister since its Cannes premiere -- a relatively short period in these hazy days of distribution -- but it shows a distinct lack of freshness all the same. Not that that's necessarily a bad thing: there's a tantalizing whiff of mediocrity to "Boarding Gate," and it's consistently set off by high levels of self-awareness and undeniable craft. Assayas's later career has been a heady stew of class and crass, yet not even in his terrific, audience-baiting pseudo-technothriller "demonlover," ...

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    REVIEW | Over the Borderline: Patricia Riggen's "Under the Same Moon"

    The main question "Under the Same Moon" poses is whether its story, which follows the basic outline of a separated mother and son fairy tale, befits its subject, the plight of illegal Mexican immigrants. The immigration issue has in the last few years become a hot one in part due to economic angst and homeland security paranoia, but Mexican director Patricia Riggen and screenwriter Ligiah Villalobos don't use their film to explore the larger political picture of fence-hopping workers and the varied American responses to their increasing numbers. Instead "Under the Same Moon" remains at ground level, showing audiences the unique backgrounds of...

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    REVIEW | Sweet Nothings: Christophe Honore's "Love Songs"

    As in last year's "Dans Paris," 37-year-old filmmaker Christophe Honore ventures back to that lost Eden known as the French New Wave, this time to punch up a featherweight tale of young love and loss with high-concept tomfoolery. And though "Love Songs" (or, if we could please use its original, more melodic title, "Les Chansons d'amour") better evokes that era's carefree cinematic spirit, it's similarly bound by dictates and referents, twice-removed and over-rehearsed. Hence "Love Songs" is not merely a musical -- in which passionate, lost twentysomethings wend their way through difficult times by breaking into pop tunes with puppy-love ingen...

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    4 comments
    tweet
    0

    REVIEW | Dead Again: Michael Haneke's "Funny Games"

    Michael Haneke's 1997 "Funny Games" always seemed more like an instruction manual than a thriller, with the famously dyspeptic Austrian auteur hesitantly going through the genre motions only to teach us something he feels we really ought to learn. Now, as if to put all doubts of his intentional dida...

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    REVIEW | The Road Well Traveled: William Maher's "Sleepwalking"

    When a film opens with shots of a straight and anonymous American highway -- that most overdetermined of American film locations -- as "Sleepwalking" does, one must be braced for a story about emotional journeys. A ribbon of asphalt stretching to the horizon is immediate shorthand for personal growth along the road of life (for, to paraphrase Tom Cochrane, life is a highway); this is as true for Captain America and Billy as it is for Steve Martin and the late John Candy. Though "Sleepwalking" offers little variation on the modern automotive odyssey to maturity (as its protagonists carpool their way to catharsis and fulfillment, sensitive pop ...

    Read More »

Popular Posts


  • Oscar Predicts Chart 2014Oscar Predictions 2015 UPDATEThompson on Hollywood
  • Daily Reads: Where to Start with 'The ...Criticwire
  • Aaron SorkinAaron Sorkin Talks 181-Page 'Jobs' Script, ...The Playlist
  • HBO Orders 'Westworld' to Series w/ ...Shadow and Act
  • The SleepwalkerExclusive: Handle The Situation In Clip ...The Playlist
  • David Ehrlich, ex-Film.com, Heads to ...Criticwire
  • Watch In-Depth 30-Minute Conversation ...Shadow and Act
  • The Hunger Games: Mockingjay—Part 1 Watch: It All Burns In New Clip And ...The Playlist
  • Directors: Brad Anderson, Patty Jenkins ...The Playlist
  • Beyond the Wall: Dir. Christian Schwochow ...SydneysBuzz
  • The DuffWatch: Mae Whitman (Her?) Is The Designated ...The Playlist
  • Stephen Hawking Applauds Eddie Redmayne's ...Thompson on Hollywood
  • Interview: Mariana Rondon Talks Meaning ...Shadow and Act
  • The Taking Of Tiger MountainWatch: First Trailer For Tsui Hark's ...The Playlist
  • Watch: How New Marvel Recruit Chadwick ...Thompson on Hollywood

Latest Tweets


Follow us