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Movie Reviews

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    CANNES REVIEW | Takashi Miike's 3-D "Hara-Kiri" Falls Short Of Its Bloody Potential

    In Japanese filmmaking machine Takashi Miike's loose adaptation of the 1962 "Hara-Kiri: Death of a Samurai," the best moments come at the end. A despondent samurai faces down the minions of a feudal lord, staging a ferocious battle for the memory of the relatives whose lives were lost to the lord's cruel mandates. The swordplay buzzes along at a breathtaking rate, the bold fighter takes on dozens of foes at once, and Miike cuts to the fleeting image of a cat watching the whole thing go down. In that passing shot, which lasts no more than a second, the director suddenly elevates the material with the welcome element of surprise. Unfortunately,...

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    CANNES REVIEW | Jafar Panahi Turns Censorship Into Art with Stunning "This is Not a Film"

    Jafar Panahi has taken risky circumstances and turned them into art. "This is Not a Film" delivers a sharp, measured critique of the conditions that now find him on his way to jail. A first-person account of the Iranian filmmaker at home awaiting news of his upcoming prison sentencing, it puts a hum...

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    With "Melancholia," Lars Von Trier Delivers a Dark Apocalyptic Masterpiece

    Editor's note: This review was originally posted as part of Indiewire's coverage of the 2011 Cannes Film Festival.

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    Critical Consensus: Woody's Cannes Opener "Paris" Is The Pick of a (Slow) Week

    As Cannes closes down its 2011 edition in the south of France, its opener is debuting Stateside. Woody Allen's "Midnight in Paris" is opening in limited release this weekend care of Sony Pictures Classics, and alongside Greg Jacobs and Jon Siskel's doc "Louder Than a Bomb" and Sundance 2010 alum "L...

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    CANNES REVIEW | Aki Kaurismaki's "Le Havre" Is a Deadpan Delight

    With its bouncy soundtrack, deadpan humor and good-natured disposition, Finnish director Aki Kaurismaki's "Le Havre" is an endearing affair. Combining his clownish storytelling with a life-affirming plot, Kaurismaki churns a fundamental scenario through his own unique narrative te...

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    CANNES REVIEW | Jailed Iranian Filmmaker Mohammad Rasoulof Delivers An Indictment With "Goodbye"

    With his fifth feature, "Goodbye," jailed Iranian filmmaker Mohammad Rasoulof delivers a suspenseful and moving portrait of modern censorship in the country that has currently placed him in its governmental crosshairs. Along with fellow Iranian filmmaker Jafar Panahi, Rasoulof has been sentenced to ...

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    Small Screens: indieWIRE's Top 5 Releases This Week

    This week Brad Anderson's ("The Machinist") latest creeps onto DVD/Blu-ray, a French classic thriller gets the Criterion treatment, a terrifying one-shot wonder hits VOD and a bunch of Pakistani slackers grow up the hard way.

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    CANNES REVIEW | Terrence Malick's "The Tree of Life" Is A Visually Astounding Achievement

    More meditation than movie, Terrence Malick's "The Tree of Life" is bound to mystify, awe and exasperate in equal measures. Another profoundly inspired and visually scrumptious multi-year production from the reclusive filmmaker, Malick's fifth feature in a career that spans three decades contains hi...

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    CANNES REVIEW | Jonathan Caouette Returns With Flawed But Fascinating "Walk Away Renée"

    When "Tarnation"--Jonathan Caouette's non-fiction account of his troubled family life--made the festival rounds in 2003, it was considered a cinematic revelation. Famously putting the whole thing together in iMovie, he assembled a collage of photo albums, home movies, voicemails and other fragmentar...

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    REVIEW | "The Artist" Pays Homage to the Silent Era, But Visuals Dominate Story

    The concept driving "The Artist," a silent, black-and-white feature designed to imitate 1920's Hollywood productions, is more commendable than its execution. Michel Hazanavicius steps beyond the self-conscious parody of his two "OSS 117" films for a bittersweet homage to...

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