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Movie Reviews

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    Why Julia Loktev's "The Loneliest Planet" Earns Its Leisurely Pace

    In "Day Night Day Night," Julia Loktev told the quietly experimental tale of a young would-be suicide bomber nervously wandering through the crowd of Times Square, impressing some critics if not much of an audience beyond that. Her long-awaited follow-up, "The Loneliest Planet,&q...

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    "Tahrir: Liberation Square" Provides an Intimate View of Cairo Protests

    A welcome contrast to the Western media's bird's eye view of the seismic January 2011 revolution in Cairo's Tahrir Square, the energetic verité documentary "Tahrir: Liberation Square" dives right into the action. As directed and shot by Italian filmmaker Stefano Sav...

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    23

    Critical Consensus: Race Car Driver Doc "Senna" Is The Pick of the Week

    Asif Kapadia's documentary "Senna" hits theaters this weekend via the Producers Distribution Agency (the company's second release after forming for "Exit Through the Gift Shop"), and its the pick of the week, according to the folks polled on criticWIRE.

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    32

    LOCARNO REVIEW | Doc-Fiction Hybrid "Year of the Tiger" Evokes Horrors of Chilean Earthquake

    The destructive earthquake that rocked Chile in 2010 provides the starting point for Sebastián Lelio's "The Year of the Tiger" (“El año del tigre”) but as a meditation on insurmountable catastrophe its intentions are highly abstract. Shot in the Chilean countryside two months after the quake struck, the movie uses the remnants of damaged homes and scattered detritus as its sets, and follows only a single character wandering through them. As his journey grows increasingly dreamlike and distant from the instigating event, "The Year of the Tiger" approaches the apotheosis of its poetic intentions before eventually--and perhaps appropriately--los...

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    30

    LOCARNO REVIEW | "The Student" Announces Santiago Mitre as a South American Aaron Sorkin

    A speedy depiction of university politics and the spirited radicalism associated with them, "The Student" ("El estudiante") announces 31-year-old Argentinean filmmaker Santiago Mitre as a South American Aaron Sorkin. A screenwriter whose credits include Pablo Trapero's "Carancho" and "Leonera," Mitr...

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    Critic's Notebook | How Movies Like "The Help" Reinforce Hollywood's Race Problem

    Nobody should be surprised by the dearth of minorities in contemporary media. On the surface, it's a boring issue: Whether or not the stories of gay, black or women characters make their way into movies and television only becomes a central issue if specific industrial forces continue to keep them o...

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    indieWIRE Picks: What to Watch on DVD, Blu-ray and VOD This Week

    This week on the small screen, legendary DP Jack Cardiff gets the tribute he deserves, Ellen Page goes a bit crazy and much more.

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    LOCARNO REVIEW | "Policeman" Is Not Your Typical Israeli Movie

    Everyone seems lost in Nadav Lapid's "Policeman" ("Ha-shoter"), an unsettling story of brawny Israeli anti-terrorist officers and the equally clueless activists they're eventually tasked with hunting down. While blatantly topical, this is not a political film of the moment, but rather a calculated m...

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    LOCARNO REVIEW | "Hanaan" Suggests "The Wire" By Way of Robert Bresson

    If Robert Bresson directed an episode of "The Wire," it might look something like sad world of drug-fueled anger and broken dreams that dominate first-time director Ruslan Pak's "Hanaan." The Uzbeki filmmaker patiently studies one man's desire to escape his diaspora and find a utopian ideal that con...

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    "Monsieur Lazhar" Delivers a Moving Take on the Classroom Drama

    The classroom drama has become such a popular genre for social analysis that it can be boiled down to a few essential ingredients: Good-natured but internally conflicted instructor takes on intellectually capable but emotionally stunted class and figures out a way to tame them. "Monsieur L...

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