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Movie Reviews

  • Indiewire
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    REVIEW | Babbling in Brooklyn: Life Lessons Abound in "Gabi on the Roof in July"

    In Lawrence Michael Levine's lightly amusing comedy "Gabi on the Roof in July," scrappy urban twentysomethings spend the summer in Brooklyn and we watch them vent. Struggling 30-year-old painter Sam (Levine) copes with a visit from his freewheeling sister Gabi (Sophia Takal, also the film's producer...

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    Small Screen (DVD/Blu-ray): "Animal Kingdom," Two Claustrophobic Thrillers & More

    This week on DVD and Blu-ray the Australian Sundance hit "Animal Kingdom" roars into homes, Ryan Reynolds finds himself "Buried" and Philip Seymour Hoffman steps into the director's chair.

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    REVIEW | A Hit Man's Second Chance: Skarsgård Excels in Deadpan Comedy "A Somewhat Gentle Man"

    In the Norwegian black comedy "A Somewhat Gentle Man," Stellan Skarsgård bares everything and yet shows so little. With a distinctively muted demeanor, Skarsgård plays a semi-reformed hit man attempting to reassemble his life after spending several years behind bars. Mostly, he appears at the mercy ...

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    Gondry Goes Green: Parsing the Music Video Influences of "The Green Hornet"

    “The Green Hornet” is one of the odder studio releases in some time. While bumbling superhero comedies have their own formula -- and much of "The Green Hornet" adheres to it -- the familiar backdrop does provide director Michel Gondry an excuse to mess around. The resulting camera placements and spe...

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    REVIEW | For the Love of Movies: Federico Veiroj's "A Useful Life"

    In "A Useful Life," director Federico Veiroj assembles a patient character study around the impact of curatorial work on individual experience. Shot in expressive black-and-white and using the Academy ratio, this is a movie about movies that could seem awkwardly familiar to some devout cinephiles.

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    REVIEW | A Life Overwhelmed: Paul Giamatti Elevates Mess of Plot in "Barney's Version"

    “Barney’s Version” is a bloated, confused movie—first a black comedy, then a distended family drama and never fully committed to either possibility. Adapting Mordechai Richler’s 1997 novel, director Richard J. Lewis aims for a sweeping narrative encompassing three decades in one man’s troubled world...

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    Small Screen (Blu-ray/DVD) | "Alamar," "Heartbreaker," "Raging Bull" Revamped & More

    This week two film festival darlings hit DVD shelves alongside a sexy French comedy and two classic titles.

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    REVIEW | Familial Disconnect: Jeff Lipsky’s “Twelve Thirty”

    Jeff Lipsky struggles to find a tricky balance in “Twelve Thirty,” a supremely dense coming-of-age drama steeped in weighty blather at the expense of emotional validity. Physically graphic and verbally frank, Lipsky’s talky portrait follows a virginal twenty-two year-old and the promiscuous family t...

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    Big Screen | This Week's Top 5: From "Barney" To Skarsgård To "The Green Hornet"

    Each week indieWIRE offers five recommendations for theatrical viewing, tackling new releases, film festivals, curated series and events. This week, some expanding December releases, Richard J. Lewis's "Barney's Version," and the curious case of "The Green Hornet" top the list.

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  • Leonard Maltin
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    Animation Marvels—In Print And On DVD

    A spectacular new book about Ray Harryhausen is cause for celebration—but more about that later. The estimable Mr. H was inspired to pursue his art, and craft, by the films he saw as a boy, especially The Lost World (1925) and King Kong (1933). But the man who created the stunning animation in those films, Willis O’Brien, wasn’t the only person experimenting with the wonders of stop-motion. Steve Stanchfield, Stewart McKissick and Ken Priebe at Thunderbean Animation have compiled a dizzying DVD collection of rare short subjects appropriately titled Stop-Motion Marvels! and it’s a must for anyone interested in this f...

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