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Movie Reviews

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    Tone Deaf: Stephan Elliott's "Easy Virtue"

    In the face of the current world financial crisis, is an urbane adaptation of a mid-20s Noel Coward comedy of manners hopelessly out-of-step, or an appropriate cinematic tonic for troubled times? The collapse of economies is perhaps an unnecessary weight with which to burden a film like "Easy Virtue," whose sole aim is providing 90 frothy, mildly entertaining minutes, but lingering around the borders of Stephan Elliott's ("The Adventures of Priscilla Queen of the Desert") take on one of Coward's earlier plays are increasingly relevant questions of wholesale societal change and the decay of class relations. It's a concern of the source text t...

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    Falling Short of Tarantino's Own High Bar, "Inglourious" Goes Bubblegum

    Given what the world expects from Quentin Tarantino - the man, the myth, the pastiche-driven movie machine - his latest feature, "Inglourious Basterds," stands out for its seemingly low ambition. Talked about for years by the filmmaker as his epic "guys-on-a-mission" movie, the final product, unveil...

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    Dargis On Von Trier

    Dargis On Von Trier

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    "Broken" Record: Almodovar's Latest Repeats His Greatest Hits

    Pedro Almodovar offers nothing new in his latest feature, "Abrazos Rotos" ("Broken Embraces"), but that's probably enough for his devout followers. With solid performances and a script that's never too hard on the ears, Spain's superstar director merely repeats the themes and conflicts of his greate...

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    Art-house Crowd Pleaser: Loach Lightens Up with "Looking for Eric"

    In 2006, British director Ken Loach won Cannes' top prize with a bracing chronicle of the Irish Republican Army's struggles against the British in the 1920s. Three years later, he's come up with a film that couldn't be more different in tone and subject matter - a lighthearted dramatic comedy about ...

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    Off The Edge: The Primal Power of Von Trier's "Antichrist"

    With "Antichrist," Lars Von Trier fully lives up to his reputation as an outrageous provocateur and master image-maker. Love it or hate it, boo it or applaud it-as audiences did both simultaneously after the world premiere here in Cannes-the film is the most shocking of the festival so far, with cri...

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    Amenabar's "Agora" Rings Hollow Despite Visual Shock and Awe

    Alejandro Amenabar's "Agora" contains a dense plot littered with historical details of Egyptian society during the Roman Empire, but none of them can save the movie from having the fleeting qualities of a high school science class.

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    "Prophet" Portends Success: Audiard's Arty Mob Film

    If James Toback's petty-criminal tale "Fingers" inspired Jacques Audiard's previous "The Beat That My Heart Skipped," it's Martin Scorsese's "Goodfellas" that looms over his latest "A Prophet." Successfully balancing art-film portraiture with a gangster picture's plot, the film may be one of the mor...

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    No Sense or Sensibility: Lee's "Woodstock" Undercooked

    Considering the iconic event at its center, the most surprising aspect of "Taking Woodstock" lies with the decision to make it into a rather flat comedy. Even with the ever-versatile Ang Lee behind the camera, this messy historical fiction plays like a two hour "Saturday Night Live" sketch, and not ...

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    Campion's Prudish "Star" Needs More Sizzle

    This might sound horribly simplistic, but Jane Campion's "Bright Star" desperately needs a sex scene. The movie puts such prominent focus on the romantic attraction shared by two characters -- early nineteenth century poet John Keats (Ben Whishaw) and his neighbor, budding fashion designer Fanny Bra...

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