Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...
Celebrating 17 Years of Film.Biz.Fans.

Movie Reviews

  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    REVIEW | Monkey See . . . Adam Rifkin's "Look"

    The gimmick of Adam Rifkin's forgettable "Look" is that it's comprised entirely of footage from surveillance cameras, or at least footage from cameras meant to simulate surveillance cameras. So guess what happens in its very first scene? Two teenage girls strip and cavort in a clothing store dressin...

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    REVIEW | Time Out of Mind: Francis Ford Coppola's "Youth Without Youth"

    Francis Ford Coppola has been quietly touting "Youth Without Youth," his first film in a decade, as a return to his independent roots, an experimental project for which he once again became a "student of cinema." It's a nice thought, one thematically linked to the film in its evocation of regeneration, as well as a possible self defense for such a foolhardy endeavor -- yet for all Coppola's possibly false modesty, the delightful fact remains that "Youth Without Youth" could only be the work of a seasoned master. In fact, opaque and challenging though it may be, and even if it was shot cheaply and on the fly in Romania, Coppola's new film isn'...

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    REVIEW | Match Point: Stefan Schaefer and Diane Crespo's "Arranged"

    "Arranged," the film itself and the story behind its conception, makes for a feel-good holiday story. Inspired by the experiences of Yuta Silverman, "Arranged" was written by Stefan Schaefer after he met with the young Orthodox Jewish woman, who had no previous connections to the New York film world, and decided the tale of her experiences finding a husband through traditional matchmaking was one worth telling. Co-directed by Schaefer and partner Diane Crespo, the final film evidences intimate knowledge of its subject, and even if it waters down that knowledge with pat nods to mainstream fare, it still maintains genuine integrity as a story o...

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    REVIEW | Frequent Flyer: Marc Forster's "The Kite Runner"

    Right off the bat, there are two telltale signs in the Hollywood adaptation of "The Kite Runner" that portend the safe, diluted entertainment about to unfold. Perhaps nervous that a prestige drama mostly told in the Afghani language of Dari, and headlined by a cast of unknown middle-Eastern actors, might not sell to the multiplexes, the producers have inserted a fancy, interminable credit sequence, backed by Alberto Iglesias's overly insistent, lute-heavy score, and adorned with some faux-Persian, animated curlicues. Then it's straight to the English-language San Francisco prologue, flatly filmed to look like any anonymous American studio pro...

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    REVIEW | Grace Notes: Eran Kolirin's "The Band's Visit"

    Though it's both a predictable culture-clash comedy and a gentle plea for people of different political backgrounds to "just get along," "The Band's Visit" nevertheless manages to use its central contrivances and inevitable cliches to its favor, and becomes something ethereal and winning. This debut from Israeli filmmaker Eran Kolirin, in which the soft-spoken members of an Egyptian brass band (the stodgy Alexandria Ceremonial Police Orchestra, to be precise) find themselves stranded in a small Israeli town on the way to a gig, parlays its initial good-natured dullness into surprisingly robust drama. Kolirin's schematics, both in its narrativ...

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    REVIEW | Southern Discomfort: Paul Schrader's "The Walker"

    Paul Schrader's fascination with life's seamier underside continues in "The Walker," whose titular character, Carter Page III is something of a latter-day incarnation of Richard Gere's American gigolo. He escorts bored, rich wives around town but, this time, he's effectively neutered: "Car" is gay (though aside from a few chaste forehead pecks and a single kiss shared with his supposedly hot-for-him boyfriend, you wouldn't know it), and trades on his Wildean (he wishes) wit rather than orgasms, a Washington D.C.-set Will for any Grace to hire. Schrader's final entry into the so-called "night worker" or "lonely man" saga, loosely beginning wi...

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    1 comment
    tweet
    0

    REVIEW | Attitude Adjustment: Jason Reitman's "Juno"

    The hype machine is chugging along at full speed for "Juno," and it's amazing what a little festival attention can do. A well-timed Telluride premiere, to an already almost legendarily appreciative audience, was soon followed by Toronto and Austin unveilings, all of which led award pundits and Enter...

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    REVIEW | The Kid Is Alright: Jennifer Venditti's "Billy the Kid"

    Like its protagonist, Jennifer Venditti's acclaimed documentary "Billy the Kid" is both pretty hard to dislike and difficult to parse. It's already scooped up awards at Edinburgh, Los Angeles, and South by Southwest film festivals, and it's easy to see why: this compelling, ingratiating portrait of some days in the life of a charming and troubled fifteen-year-old New Englander, with its canny intimacy and sharp editing, manages to be up-close-and-personal as well as safely discreet. Venditti, following around the not-quite-outcast teenager Billy verite-style, is inoffensive in her intrusion, yet also manages to make the boy a compelling scree...

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    1 comment
    tweet
    0

    REVIEW | Room with a View: Julian Schnabel's "The Diving Bell and the Butterfly"

    Like his previous films, "Basquiat" and "Before Night Falls," Julian Schnabel's "The Diving Bell and the Butterfly" attempts to elevate the middle-brow biopic to the status of high-brow art cinema. Schnabel, an artist and sometimes filmmaker, has carved out a niche for himself crafting visually arre...

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    REVIEW | Stuck Figures: Jessica Yu's "Protagonist"

    When she was commissioned to make a documentary about Euripedes (a tall order, indeed), filmmaker Jessica Yu instead chose to see if she could apply the classical Greek playwright's dramatic structuring principles to present-day living. Rather than rehash what made the tragedian's works great or set them apart from those of Aeschylus or Sophocles, or probe his dramatic intentions through a flat biography format or literal stagings of his plays, Yu decided to make Euripedes somewhat tangential, a unifying force rather than the center of attention. She then spent a long time trying to find four individuals who would reveal for the camera, in so...

    Read More »

Popular Posts


  • Oscar Predicts Chart 2016Oscar Predictions 2016 Thompson on Hollywood
  • Watch: Luther - President Obama's Anger ...Shadow and Act
  • Age of AdalineTop 10 Takeaways: 'Furious 7' Hits $320 ...Thompson on Hollywood
  • Daily Reads: How Franchise Sequels Became ...Criticwire
  • Hot Docs 2015 Women Directors: Meet ...Women and Hollywood
  • Pray for the "Third Coming" in Poster ...Shadow and Act
  • Game Of ThronesRecap: 'Game of Thrones' Season 5, Episode ...The Playlist
  • GLAAD To Honor Kelly Ripa /Bent
  • Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, First Look: Kodi Smit-McPhee As Nightcrawler ...The Playlist
  • Lisa Kudrow: 'The Comeback' Is Coming .../Bent
  • Jonathan Strange & Mr NorrellWatch: First Trailer For Mini-Series ...The Playlist
  • Me And Earl And The Dying GirlExclusive: Louisiana Film Fest Unveils ...Thompson on Hollywood
  • John Cameron Mitchell To Receive Special .../Bent
  • Specialty Box Office: 'Kurt Cobain: ...Thompson on Hollywood
  • Tribeca Film Festival 2015: 'TransFatty ...SydneysBuzz

Latest Tweets


Follow us