Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...
Celebrating 17 Years of Film.Biz.Fans.

Directors

  • Thompson on Hollywood
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    Actor-Directors: Affleck's Gone Baby Gone, Hopkins' Slipstream, Redford's Lions for Lambs

    Actors who reach a certain prominence are often able to get a movie made. This fall, Anthony Hopkins and Ben Affleck have both directed debut feature films. But the two movies couldn't be more different. Hopkins came to my UCLA class with his second film Slipstream (trailer), which premiered at Sun...

    Read More »
  • Thompson on Hollywood
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    Lust, Caution: Ang Lee Faces His Fear

    At Sunday's BAFTA screening for Lust, Caution, director Ang Lee explained that this particular nexus between sex and politics scared him to death, which was why he had to do it. He insisted on not cutting the 5 to 10 seconds that would have yielded an R rating. The sex scenes are intensely powerful....

    Read More »
  • Thompson on Hollywood
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    Darjeeling Limited: Anderson's Best Film Since Rushmore

    I'm not of the Wes Anderson-can-do-no-wrong school. I loved Bottle Rocket and Rushmore, blew lukewarm on The Royal Tanenbaums (which was often wonderful, but also awful in places), and froze out Life Aquatic. So I am happy to report that Darjeeling Limited is the best thing Anderson has done since R...

    Read More »
  • Thompson on Hollywood
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    Terror's Advocate: Barbet Schroeder Talks

    Barbet Schroeder is one of those brainiac filmmakers, like Werner Herzog, who moves effortlessly between docs (General Idi Amin Dada), features (Reversal of Fortune), studios (Murder by Numbers) and indies (Barfly), in whatever country (Maitresse) or language (Our Lady of the Assassins) that suits h...

    Read More »
  • Thompson on Hollywood
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    Penn Premieres Into the Wild

    Three men stood in the back of the Directors Guild theater beaming proudly at actor-filmmaker Sean Penn: producer Art Linson, Paramount Vantage head John Lesher and River Road financeer Bill Pohlad. Without them, the movie might not have gotten made.

    Read More »
  • Thompson on Hollywood
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    Juno Rocks

    While I was an admirer of Jason Reitman's frosh effort Thank You for Smoking, which was a wickedly funny intellectually sharp and well-acted movie, Juno is another matter entirely. One, it is written by ex-midwestern stripper-turned-blogger/screenwriter Diablo Cody, who has an uncommon ear for smart...

    Read More »
  • Thompson on Hollywood
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    TIFF: Audience vs. Critics

    Three tracks of movies screen in Toronto: high-brow innovative cinema to intrigue critics and cinephiles, movies with news content for the hungry media, and pics that wow the film fans in theaters. The most fortunate--breakouts like Jason Reitman's Juno, Joe Wright's Atonement, Craig Gillespie's Lar...

    Read More »
  • Thompson on Hollywood
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    TIFF: Atonement, Elizabeth: The Golden Age

    It was a Working Title double-header today. First, the Oscar contender: Atonement is breathtakingly assured. During Joe Wright's Pride and Prejudice, I smiled at the screen with pleasure. He took you through these people's rooms, their lives, their conversations, hopes, dreams. He made you care about them. The emotions were believably large within an intimate space. He didn't let the moviemaking overwhelm the story, he kept the cuts coming, moving fast, the dancing was spectacular. It felt modern, up-to-date, not stuck in some deadly stuffy period past. And Keira Knightley gave a winning, Oscar-nominated performance. (Here's her interview in ...

    Read More »
  • Thompson on Hollywood
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    TIFF: Flying into Toronto; Eastern Promises

    It's nuts to take a 7 AM flight; it means nobody gets any sleep. But I was not the only industryite flying Air Canada early Saturday morning.

    Read More »
  • Thompson on Hollywood
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    Rush Hour 3 Review: Ratner Winds Up Action Comedy Trilogy

    I was agreeably surprised by Brett Ratner's action-comedy Rush Hour 3, but given that it was threequel I wasn't expecting much. This time Ratner drops the bickering fish-out-of-water duo Chan and Tucker into Paris and gives Chan more comedy and Tucker more action, with entertaining results. It will ...

    Read More »

Recent Posts


  • Laura Poitras Takes Us Behind the Scenes ...Thompson on Hollywood
  • A NEW COLUMN BY MIKE SPRY: KICKING TELEVISION: ...Press Play
  • A Deadmau5 Version of "Fantasia" Would ...Animation Scoop