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Celebrating 17 Years of Film.Biz.Fans.

DVD and VOD

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    Small Screen | "Human Centipede" and "The Pentagon Papers" Make for an Eclectic Week

    This weekend, the gross-out hit of the year Tom Six's "The Human Centipede," the Oscar-nominated animated feature "The Secret of Kells," and the Sundance flicks "Don't Let Me Drown" and "Holy Rollers" come home on DVD. Also on the small screen, POV debuts the Oscar-nominated doc "The Most Dangerous...

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    Man Out of Time: Terence Davies' "Of Time and the City"

    [An indieWIRE review from Reverse Shot.]

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    Crap Artist: Robert Celestino's "Yonkers Joe"

    From the start, "Yonkers Joe" pitches the spectator directly into a world of tough-talking gamblers and sharks, where the dice are loaded, hands move quickly, and there's always a scam in the offing. This milieu of casinos and parking lots, peopled with hustlers and hookers, is a familiar film setting, but one that's produced remarkably few good films. Though the subject at hand seems ideally suited to cinema, allowing for a closer look at all the sleights and feints of card-sharp's or crap-shooter's trade, films such as "Hard Eight," "Shade," "The Cooler," and this year's "21" all mine similar material with a range of mostly disappointing re...

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    Unforgettable: Ari Folman's "Waltz with Bashir"

    [An indieWIRE review from Reverse Shot.]

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    REVIEW | Life on the Margins: Kelly Reichardt's "Wendy and Lucy"

    The Pacific Northwest on display in Kelly Reichardt's latest film isn't restorative, as in her lovely last, "Old Joy," the lust forests of which temporarily heal an ailing friendship; nor is the setting here milked for moody, romantic potential as in the recently released "Twilight." In "Wendy and L...

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    REVIEW | Dream On: Tom Gustafson's "Were the World Mine"

    The least one could ask of a wish-fulfillment fantasy film is a little buoyancy and breeziness. Yet for all its good-natured intentions, Tom Gustafson's "Were the World Mine," in which a put-upon small-town gay teen converts his hopelessly straight town (including his corn-fed jock crush) to the pin...

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    REVIEW | Setting the Record Straight: Robert Cary's "Save Me"

    Robert Cary's "Save Me" is hardly the incendiary, ripped-from-the-headlines passion play that a short description of it might imply. And indeed its poster, depicting its star, Chad Allen, skull-capped and mouth slightly agape, pointing an inverted cross to his temple, revolver-style, likewise promises a scorching take-down of bullying American fundamentalism. Yet "Save Me" isn't a teeth-bared addition to the culture wars; surprisingly docile and rigorously even-handed in its portrait of a New Mexico Christian sexual "re-education" house for men, Cary and screenwriter Robert Desiderio are not courting controversy as much as curiously surveying...

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    REVIEW | Tomb of the Mommy: Azazel Jacobs's "Momma's Man"

    Considering that Azazel Jacobs, the director of "Momma's Man," is the offspring of American avant-garde filmmaker extraordinaire Ken Jacobs, one would be forgiven for expecting his film to be more experimental and abstract than the seemingly conventional narrative that plays out. Yet buried beneath ...

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    REVIEW | Pale Fire: Woody Allen's "Vicky Cristina Barcelona"

    Each review of a new, annual Woody Allen film needn't require an overarching, state-of-his-art introduction, but it's hard to fight the urge to do so. The fact that, even at this late stage in his career, America's most prolific just-off-mainstream filmmaker instigates such charged responses from so...

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    REVIEW | Age of Consent: Isabel Coixet's "Elegy"

    In what may be a perfect sophisto storm, none other than Sir Ben Kingsley plays Philip Roth's academic antihero David Kepesh, a solemn piano underscoring his negotiations with sex, art, and mortality in the Continental Manhattan of Isabel Coixet's new film, "Elegy." Kepesh teaches literature at Colu...

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