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Review

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    Tribeca Review: 'Dark Touch' Matches Pitch Black Subject Matter To Fangoria-Style Visuals

    Director Marina De Van has had a curious career, emerging from the shadows of collaborator Francois Ozon. Her first two films were strongly indebted to a culture of Gaellic body horror that plumbed greater depths than the more commercial sadism expressed in films like "Martyrs" and "Inside," with he...

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    Review: 'Oconomowoc' Is More Coming-Of-College-Age Quirk You've Seen Before

    Bust out your bemused deadpan, it’s time for “Oconomowoc!” This excessively low-temperature film is yet another example of an indie film wanting to have its cake and eat it too: an arch, knowing approximation of indie aesthetics that both mocks and embraces its forebearers in a way that pretends the...

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    Tribeca Review: 'Six Acts' Delves Into The Darkness Of Casual Sex

    There aren't a whole lot of words to describe that feeling of intimacy where everyone knows each other in the, ah, Biblical sense, but the feelings are not necessarily all-around mutual. Such sentiment pollutes the lives of characters at the heart of "Six Acts," a powerful Israeli film that follows ...

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    Tribeca Review: 'Adult World' Spins A Quirky Comedy That Doesn't Quite Come Together

    The very first scene of "Adult World" should immediately set off warning bells. It's a glimpse of heroine Amy (Emma Roberts) as she contemplates suicide in much the same way someone goes about stacking bills; without weight, as if it's something of an eternal hassle. Except her worried countenance a...

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    Tribeca Review: 'Floating Skyscrapers' Never Dodges The Inevitability Of The Modern Gay Indie Film Tragedy

    Ideally there’d be a way around this, but it appears there is not: if you’re a gay couple in an independent film, things aren’t going to end well for you. The cloud of disaster hangs low over “Floating Skyscrapers,” a Polish drama about two male lovers that begins with the conspicuous, unseen activi...

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    Tribeca Review: ‘Almost Christmas’ Is A Mostly Joyless Misfire

    Director Phil Morrison hasn't made a film since his exceptional debut indie, "Junebug," which launched Amy Adams in 2005. Brimming with life, even without the Oscar-nominated and very-worthy firecracker Adams performance, the movie is flush with an idiosyncratic humanity and especially complex and u...

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    Tribeca Review: ‘Bluebird’ Is A Well-Observed & Striking Debut About Family, Connectedness & Consequences

    Subtle, nuanced and absorbing, Lance Edmands’ directorial debut “Bluebird” is a remarkable first feature and wise beyond his and its years. Carefully shot, well-observed and featuring terrific performances from an excellent slate of experienced, yet largely unknown actors (aside from the “Mad Men” a...

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    Tribeca Review: 'Mistaken For Strangers' A Rock Doc About Two Very Different Brothers

    In this age of social media and damage control, it’s particularly difficult to make a rock doc. It’s even more difficult if your subject is The National, a successful rock band that counts The Killers and Arcade Fire as their contemporaries, popular enough to sell out major venues worldwide and even...

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    Review: Unnerving ‘Lords of Salem’ Is Rob Zombie’s Best Film Yet

    “The Lords of Salem” is probably goth rocker-turned-filmmaker Rob Zombie’s best film, though it does often prove that the cinephile writer/director is a gifted tyro. At the same time, as his most formally mannered and tonally tempered film, Zombie’s latest also proves his versatility. Set in modern-...

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    Sarasota Film Festival Review: Regret And Doubt Darken Intimate, Haunting Drama 'Nor'easter'

    “Nor’easter” begins with a young, handsome priest divided by his duties to God and to himself, a conflict that, this time, actually feels fresh. If the expectations on God would seem to be otherworldly, so too would be the hopes directed towards his messengers, particularly Father Erik (David Call),...

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