Celebrating 17 Years of Film.Biz.Fans.

Review

  • The Playlist
    3 comments
    tweet
    6

    Tribeca Review: 'Freaky Deaky' Is A 1970s-Set Farce Where The Afros Outnumber The Laughs

    Just when you thought filmmakers had milked every gag possible from setting a movie in the 1970s, along comes writer/director Charles Matthau to prove that theory correct in the moribund Elmore Leonard adaptation “Freaky Deaky.” Though the source material takes place in 1988, Matthau hea...

    Read More »
  • The Playlist
    1 comment
    tweet
    5

    Tribeca Review: 'Rubberneck' Is A True Crime Tale That's Truly Dull

    Chances are, if the movie doesn't feature a dolphin with a prosthetic tail on the poster, and it carries "inspired by true events" disclaimer, then it's going to be something about murder, mayhem, or the decades-long search for the Zodiac killer. So by announcing that your movie is inspired by true ...

    Read More »
  • The Playlist
    0 comments
    tweet
    8

    Tribeca Review: 'Francophrenia' A Fascinating Doc/Fiction Profile Of James Franco As James Franco

    James Franco's ongoing experimentation with the limits of his own celebrity are like little else popular culture has produced of late. While his hijinks within academia and beyond are well documented (he's working on a Film MFA at NYU and an English PhD from Yale, while being a movie st...

    Read More »
  • The Playlist
    0 comments
    tweet
    5

    Tribeca Review: 'Sleepless Night' A Deceptively Simple Thriller That Packs A Punch

    Containment thrillers can often be limited by the landscape of their locale, but in the French film “Sleepless Night,” the nightclub where corrupt cop Vincent (Tomer Sisley) races to rescue his son is expansive enough to make it seem like a mini-mall. Writer-director Frederic Jardin some...

    Read More »
  • The Playlist
    2 comments
    tweet
    9

    Tribeca Review: Sarah Polley's 'Take This Waltz' Has Insights And Edges Sharp Enough To Stab

    In Sarah Polley's Toronto-set drama "Take this Waltz," Margo (Michelle Williams) stumbles across Daniel (Luke Kirby) on a business trip, only to find he lives across the street; despite being married to Lou (Seth Rogen), Margo can't stop thinking of Daniel. Or maybe it's becaus...

    Read More »
  • The Playlist
    0 comments
    tweet
    2

    Tribeca Review: 'Room 514' A Talky, Lo-Fi Israeli Version Of 'A Few Good Men'

    Coming off the heels of the formidable "Policeman," a harsh and damning critique of contemporary Israeli society, "Room 514" points a similar analytical eye on its country but comes up with little more than general arguments. Its overly familiar plot and substance weakens its voice and the movie alm...

    Read More »
  • The Playlist
    0 comments
    tweet
    5

    Tribeca Review: Abbie Cornish Shines, But The Questionable 'The Girl' Remains Ethically Dubious

    Well-told, well-shot and featuring a strong, but restrained and internalized performance from actress Abbie Cornish, director David Riker's "The Girl" is a mannered and in-the-pocket indie drama that might be a total subdued winner if it weren't for its dubious political ideol...

    Read More »
  • The Playlist
    0 comments
    tweet
    8

    Tribeca Review: 'Eddie: The Sleepwalking Cannibal' An Enjoyable If Somewhat Slight Horror-Comedy

    A blunt, no-nonsense title like "Eddie: The Sleepwalking Cannibal" perfectly describes the type of movie you're going to encounter when viewing Boris Rodriguez's first narrative feature -- a weird, darkly comic tale offering little more than an enjoyable experience. While 'Eddie' could've tried a li...

    Read More »
  • The Playlist
    2 comments
    tweet
    10

    Tribeca Review: 'Free Samples' Isn't Worth Buying

    For some reason independent movies, especially the current wave of mumble-core with its earthy existentialism and waxy photographic quality, have the reputation of somehow being more “real” or “honest” than movies in the mainstream. Because these smaller movies arrive at some emotional truth more di...

    Read More »
  • The Playlist
    0 comments
    tweet
    4

    Tribeca Review: Lightweight '30s British Romance 'Cheerful Weather For The Wedding' Mostly Wastes Its Young Stars

    There's nothing more frustrating than wasting talent. Seeing a promising young filmmaker turn in a movie that just doesn't work is as disappointing as seeing a good cast squandered by lesser material. Unfortunately, both are common but unavoidable side effects of attending film festivals and the lat...

    Read More »

Recent Posts


  • TranscendenceLeonard Maltin
  • Nailah Jefferson Talks Directing Debut ...Shadow and Act
  • Salli Richardson-Whitfield Launches ...Shadow and Act