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Review

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    Review: Life & Lust Find A Way In Well-Performed But Standard-Issue 'The Sessions'

    Inspired by the life and writings of Mark O'Brien -- a polio-stricken but determined journalist and poet confined to an iron lung since age six -- "The Sessions" offers a less comprehensive look at O'Brien's life than Jessica Yu's excellent documentary "Breathing Lesso...

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    LFF Review: Stephen Graham & Mark Strong Impress In Generic But Powerful Cop Thriller 'Blood'

    The history of the British police movie is not a glorious one. Perhaps it's because (for the most part) UK coppers aren't allowed to carry firearms, which somewhat reduces the capacity for squib-happy action sequences. Or maybe it's the lack of glamorous locations for said shootouts, which can hardl...

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    Review: 'Holy Motors' Is Beautiful Madness, Rabid And Resplendent

    Limousine movie sets. Raging erections. The theme from “Godzilla.” Eva Mendes’ armpits. Cross-dressing. Motion-capture cunnilingus. Mystical garages. Monkey marriages. Accordions. Disappointed fathers. Kylie Minogue. Murderous dopplegangers. Comedy. Tragedy. “Holy Motors.”

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    Review: 'Tai Chi Zero' An Uneven, But Playful & Enjoyable Piece Of Kung Fu Pop Art

    Just as the nation as a whole sneaks up on surpassing the United States of America as the world’s foremost superpower (if it hasn’t already), China has become more and more important to the movie world in the last few years. Grosses for the relatively few American movies released there a...

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    Review: Kids Are King In Winning Chess Doc 'Brooklyn Castle'

    It is often said that soccer is the world's game, because all you need is a ball, and anybody -- of any race or class or social standing -- can play. But if there was a close second, chess could arguably fill that slot. All you need is a board and someone to play with and you're good to go, and ther...

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    LFF Review: Strong Performances Carry An Otherwise Pedestrian 'Zaytoun'

    How affected you are by the closing scenes of "Zaytoun" may depend on your pre-existing knowledge of the Lebanese Civil War and the Israeli incursion in the country. Nothing’s spelled out in "Zaytoun" other than pointing out the date and location -- Beirut, 1982 -- but that...

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    LFF Review: 'My Brother The Devil' A Fresh & Exciting Take On The Familiar Urban Crime Drama

    British urban drama is fast becoming a crowded genre. It seems that every couple of months there’s a movie released depicting issues of drug abuse, violence and poverty in the council estates of one of London’s many recession hit suburbs. Well, in UK cinemas that is. Not many make it out...

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    Review: 'Alex Cross' Is Cliché, Action Movie Finger Paint

    Apparently the Alex Cross character, originated by best-selling author James Patterson in an unending series of pulp novels, and brought to the screen twice before (in a pair of forgettable, moodily-lit Morgan Freeman thrillers), is a bankable enough property to re-launch a large-ish franchise aroun...

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    NYFF Review: Promising Alcoholism Drama ‘Flight’ Often Hits Rock Bottom

    After 12 years immersed (lost?) in the world of motion-capture, Robert Zemeckis re-emerges into live-action filmmaking for “Flight,” an engaging and initially very promising drama about alcoholism, redemption and forgiveness that grows uneven and long winded as it progresses, clocking in just under ...

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    NYFF Review: 'Camille Rewinds' A Sweet Trifle Of A Time Travel Story

    The very first scene of “Camille Rewinds” features forty-something Camille (writer-director Noemie Lvovsky) lying in bed for a film crew, as she remains still while her throat is cut via movie magic, fake blood spurting from a pump hammered by a crew member. It’s just one of many d...

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