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    SXSW Review: A Chance At Another Beginning Illuminates The Path To 'Another Earth'

    At the start of “Another Earth,” there are two shocks administered to the audience. The first is that another planet has been discovered on the other side of the Sun, and it so closely resembles Earth that the brand new discovery is being referred to as Earth 2. This would be a galactic shocker, of ...

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    KAFFNY Review Round-Up 2: 'Centre Forward,' 'Red Chapel,' 'Sai-I-Gu,' 'Wet Sand'

    Following our first round-up, here are a few more flicks showcased in New York's Korean American Film Festival which ends March 20th. Stay tuned for more coverage, including reviews of "Should've Kissed" by Cinefondation-residency alum Jinoh Park and "Make Yourself At Home" by student Academy Award-...

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    Review: Tom McCarthy’s ‘Win Win’ Balances Heartfelt & Hilarious Small Victories

    The following is a reprint of our Sundance review by our correspondent James Rocchi.

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    Review: 'The Gift To Stalin' Aims To Be Moving & Sentimental But Comes Up Flat

    1949: A cargo train pulls into an unspecified area, and immediately children accost it with pans full of hot water. They run around like little merchants with a fresh mouth: "Buy hot water! Don't be stingy!" they tell the soldiers who dip out of the sliding doors, dying for anything wet. The scene shifts into one of the compartments; a boy (Sashka, Dalen Schintemirov) delivers water to his grandfather who dies before he can get a drop on his tongue. It's just one casualty of many, though, and the soldiers -- members of the Soviet Union -- stop off in a Kazakhstan village to unload the waste. Kasym (Nurzhuman Ikhtimbaev), a road worker, procee...

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    SXSW Review: Jodie Foster's 'The Beaver' Starring Mel Gibson Can't Quite Hit Its Tonal Sweet Spot

    Tonight on the stage of the Paramount theater at the SXSW Film Festival in Austin, Texas, director/actress Jodie Foster admitted that getting the tenor right for her new film "The Beaver" was the hardest endeavor of her career and it shows. Walking a tonal tightrope of voice -- light comedy, saddeni...

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    SXSW Review: 'Kill List' Is A Shocking, Emotionally Resonant & Horrific Ride

    Few movies have scarred and emotionally terrorized people (including some on the Playlist staff) more than this year's SXSW Film Festival entry "Kill List," the sophomore feature from Ben Wheatley ("Down Terrace"). With its intriguing mixture of kitchen-sink domestic drama, hit man thriller, and creepy mysticism, it's the rare horror film -- which isn't really a "horror film" per se, but includes psychological, emotional and physically horrifying moments -- that doesn't play into any conventions of the genre. Every time you think you've pegged it neatly into one of the aforementioned genres, it'll swing around and surprise you again, and the ...

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    Review: 'Limitless' Expands The Boundaries of Bradley Cooper's Charm

    Originally (and enigmatically) titled “Dark Fields,” Neil Burger’s latest film now bears the bland moniker “Limitless,” making it sound like a film scraped together from D.C. Comics’ dregs. But rather than being another entry in the seemingly neverending superhero genre, “Limitless” is a sci-fi-infl...

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    SXSW Review: We Aren't Buying Morgan Spurlock's 'Greatest Movie Ever Sold'

    "POM Wonderful Presents: The Greatest Movie Ever Sold" (yeah, that's actually the full title), Morgan Spurlock's new takedown of product placement in television shows and movies, starts out cleverly enough, with a sharp analysis of all the ways in which major corporations, in their limitless, greedy...

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    SXSW Review: 'New Jerusalem' A Hypnotic Film Experience About Friendship And Religion

    Despite a rather large and enthusiastic critical embrace of American neo-neo realism ("Wendy and Lucy," "Goodbye Solo," "Ballast," and a few others), there haven't been many (if any) new players entering the field. By contrast, mumblecore micro-indies are cropping up like corn, with young directors seizing the me-too attitude and grabbing shitty cameras to capture characters in apartments talking about relationships or focusing on their own inadequacies. Some are different, some are great, and like anything, you have to wade through the shit (which still get perplexing amounts of overenthusiastic quotes) in order to find the few artists pushi...

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