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Review

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    Review: 'Trollhunter' Visits The 9-To-5 Lifestyle Of The Monster Killer

    If you're one of the countless people that saw "Cloverfield" but felt there just weren't enough trolls, it appears that your needs have been catered to. "Trollhunter" is the latest in the Found Monster Footage genre, a weirdly-specific niche that accommodates the necessity of shooting cheaply with d...

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    Review: Michael Winterbottom's 'The Trip' A Wickedly Funny Road Trip

    This review originally ran during the Tribeca Film Festival.

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    Review: 'Bobby Fischer Against The World' An Intriguing Portrait Of Genius & Madness

    It's hard to believe, but at one time chess was a national obsession and that was all due to one man: Bobby Fischer. A genius, enigma, egotist and sensitive recluse all rolled into one, Fischer's dynamic and unparalleled performance with chess pieces was matched by his notably eccentric personality ...

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    "Viva Riva!" Film Review

    Writer/director Djo Tunda Wa Munga said that one of his motivations in making Viva Riva was to counter some of the long-standing, dominant perceptions of Africa and African art.I’d say he accomplishes this goal, with a film that unabashedly depicts the kind of orchestrated sexuality and violence rarely seen in African cinema (specifically in the Democratic Republic Of The Congo – DRC – where such scenes are taboo); though there must be something to be said for being so audacious with this kind of carnage and salacity, in a country still recovering from a war that killed millions of people, and saw women subjected to worst kind of sexual viola...

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    Review: The Drug Kingpin As Academic In 'Mr. Nice'

    Movies, and society as a whole, have struggled with how to portray drug dealers. The default showcase is the bloodthirsty villain, the person who is so one-dimensional as to think he knows what he’s doing is wrong, but does so anyway. But the cinema isn’t afraid to glamorize the profession either, showcasing the supplier as paradigm-busting rock star -- the best cars, the best planes, the best fashion, with a sex partner on each arm. Few opportunities have been taken to redefine the drug dealer as someone with a job, someone who isn’t desperately obsessed with his rise and fall, or the media circus that may relate to his surroundings. Then ag...

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    Review: 'Turkey Bowl' Successfully Portrays A Fractured Group Of Friends...And Football!

    As we grow older, a number of unavoidable sad truths smack us square in the face. Many of them are probably things we swore would never happen to us -- and hey, wouldn't you know it, they did. One of these is the deterioration of a group of friends either due to distance, change in interests, or lack of convenience. In terms of mortality and the fragility of life they're not so dire, but there's still something very defeating about losing touch with people that, at one point, we had very substantial bonds with. Even the occasional get-togethers have a lingering "It's not what it used to be" sentiment for somebody, even if it's better to not h...

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    Review: 'Rejoice And Shout' Attempts To Cover A Century Of Gospel In 2 Hours

    It always seemed like music was the only art where the subject didn't matter. If there's a good beat, a catchy hook, some sort of inventiveness, and/or intensified drive, most don't care what the hell the singer is spewing, even if it's about their specific belief system. Throw a bunch of hard-ass atheists on the dance floor and throw on "Jesus Walks"; see how many stomp their feet and protest (actually, don't, keep reading). There's numerous other examples (how many trendy God-hating teens like Christian-Metalcore band Underoath? Quick answer, too many), but for other mediums, it's not the case. Religious imagery feels too pushy, and while b...

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    Review: 'Beautiful Boy' Presents Tragedy As An Acting Exercise

    If you were, or still are, a post-millennial creative-type, there’s a chance you channeled the emotions and experiences of events like the Columbine massacre or 9/11 into some form of art. Very few of these ended up being films, books, or songs where audiences found meaning. Several of these people ...

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    Review: 'Submarine’ Is A Smart & Sharp Coming-Of-Age Comedy & A Promising Debut

    One of the best films at this year's Sundance Film Festival was one that actually had its debut at last year’s TIFF. Richard Ayoade’s “Submarine” is a remarkably assured debut filled with dry humor, inventive visual wit and great performances. Adapted by Ayoade from a 2008 coming-of-age novel by Joe Dunthorne, the film follows 15 year old Oliver Tate (a perfectly cast Craig Roberts), a somewhat delusional teenager who believes himself to be a literary genius, (he reads Nietzsche and searches the dictionary for new words), but in actuality is a social outcast who gets bullied at school and doesn’t know how to talk to girls. Oliver develops a c...

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    Review: Jean-Luc Godard's 'Film Socialisme' Is A Pointless Exercise In...We Don't Even Know What

    The following is a reprint of our review from the Cannes Film Festival in 2010.

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