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Review

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    Review: 'The Way Back' Is A Stride Of Pride

    Reinventing the struggles of yesterday for cinematic purposes is a practice as old as the art form itself. Of course, there’s the three-act structure and the Joseph Campbell bullshit that contorts history into protagonist(s) battling incredible odds to provide a last second miracle, with theme being...

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    Review: 'Another Year' Is Four Bittersweet Seasons Of Laughter, Love & Tears

    This review originally ran during the 2010 Toronto Film Festival.

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    Review: 'Blue Valentine' Delivers With A Prickly, Raw & Devastating Punch

    This review originally ran during the Cannes Film Festival.

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    Review: 'The Illusionist' Is A Moving, Magical Animated Feast

    "The Illusionist" has an interesting history, and it seems downright magical that it made it to the cinemas at all. The project originated as a script by French comedy master Jacques Tati, completed with his writing partner Henri Marquet shortly before Tati would tackle his large-scale comedy master...

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    Review: 'Gulliver's Travels' Another Big Budget Comedy With A Cast Showing Up & Cashing Paychecks

    Either it's a trend or a freak coincidence (or some mixture of both), but December has found A-list stars cashing paychecks and slumming it in sub-par material. Johnny Depp, Angelina Jolie and their silly putty faces floated through the turgid romantic thriller, " The Tourist," that was neither sexy nor exciting, and audiences smelled their half-hearted participation from a mile away. Owen Wilson, Paul Rudd, Reese Witherspoon and Jack Nicholson failed to convince anybody to see James L. Brooks' over-populated, people-talking-on-telephones comedy "How Do You Know." Opening this week is "Little Fockers," the terrible forthcoming installment in ...

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    Review: 'Somewhere' Is A Shallow Disappointment From An Ossified Sofia Coppola

    This review originally ran during the London Film Festival.

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    Review: 'Little Fockers' Is That Lump of Coal You (Apparently) Asked For

    A blatant cash grab from studio logos to closing credits, “Little Fockers” takes the money-making formula of "Meet the Parents" and "Meet the Fockers" and adds adorable kids, Jessica Alba, and glorified cameos from Harvey Keitel and Laura Dern into the mix. Families will flock to the holiday release with gusto, but it’s up for debate whether 100 minutes with the Focker and Byrnes families is worse than quality time with your own dysfunctional clan. Sure, there are a few laughs, but we’re not talking minor discomfort on the level with your aunt having spinach casserole stuck in her teeth and blithely smiling for the camera. “Little Fockers” is...

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    Review: John Cameron Mitchell's Grieving Drama 'Rabbit Hole' Digs Up Deep Emotion

    This review originally ran during the 2010 Toronto International Film Festival.

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    Review: 'Casino Jack' Showcases A Broken System With Irreverent Glee But An Unfocused Eye

    In case you needed a primer on what a lobbyist is, “Casino Jack” has got you covered. Based on the rise and fall of disgraced Washington man-about-town Jack Abramoff, the comedy-drama explains with great detail and full color exactly what a lobbyist does, what sort of influence they wield and their ...

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    Review: 'How Do You Know' Is An Uneven But Ultimately Pleasant Experience

    With a recent influx of middling romantic comedies, it's easy to forget how different the genre used to be. Now very polished and only a success if it stars 40 different actors/actresses each with three minutes of screen time, movies including "Green Card" and "Crossing Delancey" showed a different side of things. Instead of drowning audiences in star power, they offered a down-to-earth and complex female individual with an unfortunate penchant for choosing the wrong guy. It was easy to figure out who to root for, but there was something more to it. It may have been the comfortable aura the movies had about them, or the fact that their protag...

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