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Scott McGehee & David Siegel

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    Review: 'What Maisie Knew' Is Deeply Affecting, Hard To Watch

    It’s often an easy way to handicap your film, by centering it on a child character and demanding a great deal from the young actor. By definition, children are not fully-formed people, but a character in a film must be either fully-formed to yield proper dramatic results, or so uniquely authentic th...

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    Toronto 2012: Millennium Entertainment Acquires Drama 'What Maisie Knew' Starring Julianne Moore and Steve Coogan

    In the latest pick-up of a popping Toronto market, Millennium Entertainment has acquired U.S. rights to “What Maisie Knew,” starring Julianne Moore, Alexander Skarsgård and Steve Coogan. The contemporary version of the Henry James novel, directed by Scott McGehee and David Siegel, ...

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    TIFF Capsule Review: 'What Maisie Knew'

    The latest by the directorial team of Scott McGehee and David Siegel is a modernized take on Henry James’ novel about a sweet little girl who’s saddled with two of the world’s worst parents. Indeed, it’s hard to imagine a pair less deserving of six-year-old Maisie (Onata Aprile) than Susanne (Julianne Moore), a temperamental rock singer, and Beale (Steve Coogan), an art dealer who’s even more self-involved. Since their selfishness is made perfectly clear in the opening scenes depicting the couple’s breakup, it’s a shame that McGehee and Siegel feel the need to reiterate the point so often as Maisie...

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    Julianne Moore, Alexander Skarsgard & Steve Coogan To Star in 'What Maisie Knew'

    Scott McGehee and David Siegel are a curious directing pair. With a mere four films across over fifteen years, they've made consistently interesting work without ever quite knocking one out of the park. Their noirish racial-identity debut "Suture" is arguably their best -- championed by Steven Soderbergh, and with a terrific turn by Dennis Haysbert, it still holds up well today. Their long-awaited follow up "The Deep End" had another storming central performance, from Tilda Swinton, but had a more straightforward take on the genre, while kabbalistic spelling oddity "Bee Season," with Richard Gere, didn't really work, and the Joseph Gordon-Lev...

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