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Sundance 2012 Reviews

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    Sundance Review: 'Black Rock' A Back-To-The-Wilds Slasher With Brains & Bonding Along With The Blood

    There is, ultimately, something to be said for the pleasures of a simple, sleek and well-shot run-or-kill-or-die thriller where our heroes, trapped in the middle of nowhere and confronted by hostile locals, strike back to survive. And that, at heart, is what "Black Rock," the second direct...

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    Sundance Review: Mary Elizabeth Winstead & Aaron Paul Hit the Bottle, And It Hits Back, In Strong, Stirring 'Smashed'

    There is a sub-canon of films about alcohol as deep and as dark as a barrel of bourbon, from "Lost Weekend" to "Days of Wine and Roses" to "Trees Lounge." "Smashed," premiering at the 2012 Sundance Film Festival, casts Aaron Paul and Mary Elizabeth Winste...

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    Sundance Review: So Yong Kim’s Stark 'For Ellen' Experiment Is A Grinding & Exhaustive Experience

    "For Ellen," Korean-American writer/director So Yong Kim’s third film after breakout indie dramas "In Between Days" and "Treeless Mountain," is shot in the same style of her preceding films. The way she films long uninterrupted takes of Joby (Paul Dano), a se...

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    SUNDANCE REVIEW: "Kid-Thing" Is An Eccentric Curiosity, Courtesy the Zellner Bros.

    Austin-based sibling filmmakers Nathan and David Zellner make movies in a loony vacuum in which the only constant is a fixation on the bizarre. While technically geared toward comedy, neither their feature-length "Goliath" (which also premiered in the NEXT section, at Sundance 2009) nor in...

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    Sundance 2012: "Teddy Bear" is a Sweet Drama With a Lovably Large Breakout Performance

    The main conceit of Mads Matthiesen’s “Teddy Bear” (aka "10 Timer til Paradis") which was previously established in his 2007 short film “Dennis,” is that its protagonist is a bulging bodybuilder who ironically isn’t macho at all. The idea that this guy, Dennis, is introverted, awkward with women and...

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    Sundance 2012 Review - "An Oversimplification Of her Beauty" (A Complex Exploration Of The Dance Between Id, Ego & Super Ego)

    They say that there's something of every artist in the work they create, whether a conscious decision or not; and the act of creating with the intent to surrender your creation (and in essence a piece of yourself) to a potentially scrutinizing audience, requires some degree of courage on the par...

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    SUNDANCE REVIEW | Why 'Red Hook Summer' Is Both Spike Lee's Weakest and Most Sincere Work In Years

    SUNDANCE REVIEW | Why 'Red Hook Summer' Is Both Spike Lee's Weakest and Most Sincere Work In Years

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    Sundance Review: 'Lay The Favorite' A Comedy That's An Empty Bet

    “You can't blame Stephen Frears for trying” seems to be the mantra for "Lay the Favorite," a mild romp through the T&A world of Las Vegas, gambling and literary adaptation. After all, "High Fidelity" is an iconic film to obsessive nerds (Need proof? See: every...

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    Sundance Review: 'Simon Killer' Loses That Lovin' Feeling On The Streets Of Paris

    Simon (Brady Corbet) is lost. After being dumped by his high school sweetheart after a relationship that ran the length of their college years, the newly graduated, newly single American flees to Paris to get away from it all and find himself. Of course, the problem with undertaking such a journey o...

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    Sundance Review: Less 'Wrong' Than Bad, Quentin Dupieux's Followup To 'Rubber' Proves Him To Be A Half-Hit Wonder

    Received at film fests and among cult cinema fans with the giddy glee of an inside joke, Quentin Dupieux's "Rubber" was a film more celebrated than ultimately worthy of celebration. Dupieux's piss-take on '70s killer-car horror (and, by extension, all cinema) as a psychic rubbe...

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