Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...
Celebrating 17 Years of Film.Biz.Fans.

In Theaters

  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    Living for the City: Barry Jenkins's "Medicine for Melancholy"

    The structure of Barry Jenkins's "Medicine for Melancholy" allows for a terrific twist right off the bat. Like many other modestly budgeted American indies, Jenkins's film follows two people getting to know each other, as they wander an expressive cityscape, over the course of one day -- aloofness gives way to intimacy, flirtation transitions into intellectual probing, daytime turns to night. The major difference here lies in the deployment sexual tension: this man and this woman aren't looking to sex as the endpoint, for this day is already the aftermath of an anonymous one-night-stand. The goal, as it were, has already been met; now if they...

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    Bad Trip: Olly Blackburn’s “Donkey Punch”

    [An indieWIRE review from Reverse Shot.]

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    Stolen Identity: Ole Bornedal's "Just Another Love Story"

    [An indieWIRE review from Reverse Shot.]

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    Magic Hour: Carlos Reygadas's "Silent Light"

    [An indieWIRE review from Reverse Shot.]

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    The Bad German: Vicente Amorim's "Good"

    [An indieWIRE review from Reverse Shot.]

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    Dead Souls: "Alexey Balabanov's 'Cargo 200'"

    [An indieWIRE review from Reverse Shot.]

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    Expiration Date: Joel Hopkins's "Last Chance Harvey"

    [An indieWIRE review from Reverse Shot.]

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    A Corner in Couscous: Abdellatif Kechiche's "The Secret of the Grain"

    There's no "secret" -- of cooking, of love, of financial success -- in Abdellatif Kechiche's "The Secret of the Grain," though there is indeed plenty of grain. Though it's also played under the simpler name of "Couscous," the film is actually called "The Grain and the Mullet" in French -- the latter half of the title denoting the fish and not the novelty haircut. Maybe none of these quite captures the film, which in its length and dozen-or-so characters is itself difficult to succinctly summarize, but the original title does at least point to fish and couscous, the celebrated signature dish of the now fractured Beiji family. Each Sunday, Soua...

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    Leap of Faith: Darren Aronofsky's "The Wrestler"

    [An indieWIRE review from Reverse Shot.]

    Read More »
  • Indiewire
    0 comments
    tweet
    0

    So Help Me God: Rod Lurie's "Nothing But the Truth"

    [An indieWIRE review from Reverse Shot.]

    Read More »

Recent Posts


  • Trailer for Animated Feature Film Inspired ...Shadow and Act
  • Another 'Brewster's Millions' Film Adaptation ...Shadow and Act
  • Wild CanariesSXSW: Amateur Sleuths Solve A Mystery ...The Playlist