Set in a village in Quebec, Denis Côté’s “Curling” follows inveterate loner Jean-François, a single father, and his isolated 12-year-old daughter Julyvonne. Between his unremarkable jobs, Jean-François devotes an awkward energy to Julyvonne until some unexpected events jeopardize the fragile balance of their relationship. [Synopsis courtesy of Toronto International Film Festival]

Joy of Man’s Desiring

Who is the woman addressing as she looks over her shoulder, eyes cast down, and speaks? The director, the audience, an invisible third party? Softly, yet firmly, she explains that ‘we have to trust each other’. The opening scene sets the tone of the film. We see and hear powerful machinery and deafening noise; people operating the machines, feeding them, full of concentration, locked into abstract processes; conversations during breaks in the locker room and the cafeteria. But Denis Côté’s Que ta joie demeure is not a documentary about being a slave to the machine, alienation, dehumanisation or exploitation. [Synopsis courtesy of Berlinale]