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Dashboard Confessional

Dashboard Confessional

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If you’ve ever yearned to watch (as well as hear and practically feel) Academy Award nominee Stephen Rea writhe gorily in windshield glass for the better part of 85 minutes, Stuck is your movie. From go, the key word is unpleasantness. A shabby opening credits sequence scored to generic, dime-bin rap gives way to an incontinent patient at a senior home evacuating his bowels in bed before receiving a hosing in the shower. This glimpse of man at his most physically debased and undignified is a prelude to the story’s look at equivalent moral putrefaction, humankind’s potential for a state of zero empathy. To find this heart of squalor, writer John Strysik and co-writer/director Stuart Gordon reached, like so many idea-starved creators before them, to the tabloids, and a story from seven years back about a woman in Texas who hit a homeless man with her car, lodging him in the windshield. He did not immediately die, but she panicked. Instead of finding him help she left him stuck there in her garage for days.

Both Law & Order and CSI already “ripped” the story from the headlines, and it’s a wonder that anyone felt that this nasty News of the Weird curio deserved the feature film treatment. But there it is, onscreen, brought to you by the director of Re-Animator, with a cast led by Mena Suvari in cornrows. Click here to read the rest of Justin Stewart’s review of Stuck.

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