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Cannes Day 12: Minute by Minute

Cannes Day 12: Minute by Minute

Each day at the Cannes Film Festival (May 12 – 23), indieWIRE is publishing a frequently updated dispatch from France. All times listed are local French time.

Catching up with Cannes: DAY 1 | DAY 2 | DAY 3 | DAY 4 | DAY 5 | DAY 6 | DAY 7 | DAY 8 | DAY 9 | DAY 10 | DAY 11

More: Latest Reviews | Guide & Grades | Complete Coverage

Blogs: Anne Thompson | Todd McCarthy | Sydney Levine | Eric Kohn | Eugene Hernandez

Winners: Full list of Cannes prizes.

11:09 PM: Personal. Political. — A victory for both personal and political cinema is how winners described the Cannes Film Festival’s awards tonight as the 2010 event came to a close. A challenging Thai art film by an acclaimed international auteur (with a difficult to pronounce name) won the top prize at the festival… [Full awards wrap-up at indieWIRE]

8:52 PM: The Future — “I believe that the future is very good, very bright for cinema,” Gael Garcia Bernal said tonight, backstage at the Cannes Film Festival, seated alongside Michael Rowe, who received the Camera d’Or for “Año Bisiesto” from Mexico.

8:37 PM: The Affect — How will this jury experience change your work in film, a journalist asks the jury.

“This is the reason I am here,” Tim Burton reacted. “When you are making films, you don’t get to see films.” He said that he appreciated the opportunity to see work he wouldn’t necessarily get a chance to see, saying that he has, “A new found enthusiasm for film and ideas.

8:29 PM: The Challenge — Tim Burton seems a bit resistant to answering questions backstage here tonight, saying again a few minutes ago, “I’ve done a lot of talking…”

‘Is it difficult to be a filmmaker judging other filmmakers’, indieWIRE asked jury president Tim Burton a few moments ago.

“Yes,” he said, “Anybody who makes film… we admire how difficult it is. We all went into this with a respect for all filmmakers. We don’t even like to be called judges or jurors, just fellow filmmakers. And we like to keep everything in that spirit.”

8:20 PM: Why? — Asked about the jury’s choice of Apichatpong Weerasethakul for the Palme d’Or. Burton initially cut the discussion short, saying, “We’ve been talkign about it all day, so we really don’t want to talk about it anymore.”

Pressed further, he added, simply, “It’s like a beautiful, strange dream that you don’t see very often.”

8:16 PM: Jury press conference — The press conference is beginning backstage now, coverage continuing here shortly.

8:05 PM: Cheers and Tears — An emotional Apichatpong Weerasethakul accepted the Palme d’Or, stirring the audience as he called this is a significant moment for Thailand and thanked his mom in a moving speech.

8:01 PM: Winner! — Apichatpong Weerasethakul wins the Palme d’Or. I would like to kiss all of you, the jury, Apichatpong Weerasethakul said moments ago, wearing a white tux and accepting the festival’s top prize.

7:56 PM: Grand Prize — The Grand Prix, presented by Salma Hayek, to “Of Gods and Men” by Xavier Beauvois.

7:49 PM: It’s a Tie — Javier Bardem wins one best actor award for “Biutiful” and Elio Germano, from “La Nostra Vita” wins the second.

7:46 PM: For Panahi — Accepting the acting award, Juliette Binoche holds up a sign, it reads: JAFAR PANAHI. She speaks out (in French) in support of the imprisoned Iranian filmmaker.

7:42 PM: Best Actress — “What a joy,” praised an emotional Juliette Binoche, saluting director Abbas Kiarostami moments ago, receiving the best actress award for her starring role in the Iranian filmmaker’s new film, “Certified Copy.”

7:40 PM: Best Screenplay — Lee Chang-dong wins the Best Screenplay prize for “Poetry.”

7:35 PM: Best Director — Kirsten Dunst presenting the Prix de la Mise en Scene (best director) to Mathieu Amalric for “Tournee” (On Tour)

7:31 PM: Prix du Jury — Asia Argento presenting the Prix du Jury to “The Screaming Man.”

7:26 PM: First timer — Gael Garcia Bernal and Emmanuelle Beart present the Camera d’Or to Michael Rowe for “Año Bisiesto” from the Director’s Fortnight section of the festival.

7:22 PM: Shorts — First up tonight, Atom Egoyan presents the prizes for short film.

7:10 PM: Joe in the House — Also arriving moments ago, for the Cannes Film Festival awards ceremony: Apichatpong Weerasethakul.

7:04 PM: The Awards Arrivals — Watching the red carpet arrivals on closing night always gives a hint of which film will win something. Arriving a few minutes ago, to cheers outside the Palais des Festivals, were: Abbas Kiarostami and Juliette Binoche, Alejandro Gonzalez with Javier Bardem, actresses from Mathieu Amalric’s “Tournee” (On Tour).

6:15 PM: The Winners — Awards of the 2010 Cannes Film Festival are being presented tonight in France, closing the 63rd edition of the festival. In the past few days, prizes for the Un Certain Regard, Directors Fortnight and Critics Week sections of the festival have been announced (and are listed below), leading up to tonight’s ceremony announcing the Cannes competition prizes. [Full list of winners at indieWIRE]

6:09 PM: Oh God(ard) — On the eve of Cannes, I sat with some colleagues around a dinner table overlooking the sea and the hulking Palais des Festivals beside it. The topic was the upcoming program and its potential for controversy. When movies screen under these grandiose conditions, they tend to meet wildly polarized reactions—but only the most audacious, challenging or subversive works rise to the top of Cannes history and stay there… This year, nobody guessed that Jean-Luc Godard would bypass all of them. [More at indieWIRE]

11:52 AM: Araki Thanks –Just in from Gregg Araki, a statement from Gregg Araki on winning the first Queer Palm prize yesterday here in Cannes:

“I was so deeply honored and humbled when I learned ‘Kaboom’ had been chosen to participate in this year’s Main Selection. Like the protagonist of my movie, I was a Film Studies major in college and I never even dreamed that one day a film of mine might show in the Palais where all the legendary auteurs I’ve admired and idolized over the years have screened their films. To win the festival’s first Queer Palm Award on top of all this is almost beyond belief! Thanks to Thierry Fremeaux and everyone at the festival, to Pascal Caucheteux and Sebastian Lemercier of Why Not and Vincent Maraval of Wild Bunch, to my producer Andrea Sperling, to my amazing cast and crew and most of all to the incredible, crazy audience that turned out for our movie last Saturday and made that night the most unforgettable and extraordinary night of my life. Merci beaucoup!” – Gregg Araki.

10:58 AM: Les Palmares Infertiles — “One can only hope that Thierry Fremaux’s pre-festival promise of a splendid lineup for Cannes 2011 holds true, as 2010 has been a year when much of the best fruit fell far from the tree of the competition,” wrote Todd McCarthy today, surveying this year’s festival.

“Moving into Sunday, the festival’s final day, when the awards will be decided and announced, the rumor from inside the jury was that, while the mood has been most congenial and a number of films have impressed the judges, no single film has provided the knockout punch to consolidate any kind of concensus, meaning we should expect some compromises and a spreading of the wealth,” he said, “This feeling is shared by most observers who have seen the competition entries and, looking at my own list of grades I supplied for the critics’ rankings, I scored no competition entry higher than a B. I have it on good authority that at least one jury member was wild about Thai director Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s ‘Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives’ and, based on Hong Sangsoo’s ‘Ha Ha Ha’ having won the prize for best feature in an unusually strong Un Certain Regard lineup Saturday night, South Korea could be in for a very big year if Lee Chang-dong’s highly regarded ‘Poetry’ does well with the main jury.” [More at Todd McCarthy’s Deep Focus]

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