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iW Daily Recap | 5 Stories Not to Miss for Thursday

iW Daily Recap | 5 Stories Not to Miss for Thursday

indieWIRE Recaps is a daily column that curates indie news and stories from around the film world. If you’d like to suggest an article, you can find us at editors@indiewire.com

The arduous process of bringing “Gambit” to the screen

It seems the independent film world isn’t the only place where it can take seemingly forever to get a film made. Deadline tells the story of making “Gambit,” Micheal Hoffman’s caper remake, starring Colin Firth and Cameron Diaz, with a script by the Coen brothers. Click here to read about the long road to producing one of Hollywood’s great unmade scripts.

Johnny Depp admits he didn’t see “Pirates 2” and “3”

It turns out Johnny Depp was just as confused as everyone else about the plot lines in the second and third “Pirates of the Caribbean” films. In fact, he didn’t even see the finished products. EW provides choice quotes from Depp regarding the franchise. “They had to invent a trilogy out of nowhere[…]This guy is this guy’s dad, and this guy was in love with this broad. It was like, ‘What?’”

MTV Networks Chairman and CEO steps down

Viacom announced that Judy McGrath will step down as the Chairman and CEO of MTV Networks. There are no plans to replace McGrath, who has been Chairman and CEO since 2004. The Hollywood Reporter has more information on this change in power.

A visual history of movie posters

Great movie posters don’t just advertise a product. They create iconic images with a lasting spot in the cultural zeitgeist. At the very least, they make excellent dorm room decorations. Creative Overflow presents a comprehensive visual history of the evolution of this art form over 90 years.

Love is in the air

This week marks the release of three wedding-themed movies: “Jumping the Broom,” “Something Borrowed” and “When Harry Tries to Marry.” The LA Times investigates this recent rash of nuptial-obsessed flicks and why audiences still love to pay to see people say, “I do.”

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