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Amber Tamblyn Pens Moving New York Times Article: ‘I’m Done With Not Being Believed’

James Woods called her a liar this week. She isn't standing for it.

Amber Tamblyn

To/Variety/REX/Shutterstock

Earlier this week, James Wood made the ill-advised decision to criticize the premise of Luca Guadagnino’s “Call Me by Your Name,” which centers around the homosexual romance between a 24-year-old and 17-year-old. “As they quietly chip away the last barriers of decency. #NAMBLA,” the actor tweeted.

The first response, from “Call Me by Your Name” star Armie Hammer, was fairly humorous in the way it pointed out Woods’ hypocrisy: “Didn’t you date a 19 year old when you were 60…….?” The next, from Amber Tamblyn, was less so: “James Woods tried to pick me and my friend up at a restaurant once. He wanted to take us to Vegas. ‘I’m 16’ I said. ‘Even better’ he said.”

The actress followed that up with an open letter in Teen Vogue and is in today’s edition of the New York Times with an even more moving piece inspired, in part, by Woods’ denial of her account. “For women in America who come forward with stories of harassment, abuse and sexual assault, there are not two sides to every story, however noble that principle might seem,” she writes. “Women do not get to have a side.”

Simply coming forward with her stories is dangerous, she continues:

“I have been afraid of speaking out or asking things of men in positions of power for years. What I have experienced as an actress working in a business whose business is to objectify women is frightening. It is the deep end of a pool where I cannot swim. It is a famous man telling you that you are a liar for what you have remembered. For what you must have misremembered, unless you have proof.”

As more and more women do so, however, they’re “learning that the more we open our mouths, the more we become a choir. And the more we are a choir, the more the tune is forced to change.” Read Tamblyn’s full piece here.

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