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‘The Kid Who Would Be King’ Trailer: Joe Cornish’s ‘Attack the Block’ Follow-Up Puts Funny Spin on Arthurian Legend

Seven years after earning major affection from genre fans with his smart and funny alien invasion thriller, the filmmaker finally returns to the big screen.

“The Kid Who Would Be King”

Twentieth Century Fox

“It’s a tough world out there, and it’s getting tougher all the time.”

Nearly a decade after winning massive affection from genre fans with his inventive alien invasion thriller “Attack the Block,” filmmaker Joe Cornish is finally back on the big screen with his long-awaited follow-up. This time around, Cornish appears to be applying his same keen eye to another seemingly played-out film genre: the sword-in-the-stone Arthurian legend. As he did with “Attack the Block,” Cornish’s “The Kid Who Would Be King” puts a funny and fresh twist on classic story, setting it in modern-day London and putting the focus on a cadre of whipsmart kids.

“The Kid Who Would Be King” stars “Mowgli” star Louis Ashbourne Serkis as Alex, a seemingly regular tween who unexpectedly discovers a massive sword buried in an even bigger stone, only to pull it loose, unleashing a centuries-old evil. As Alex comes to grips with his strange new fate and prepares to battle the evil Morgana (Rebecca Ferguson), he gathers his own Knights of the Round Table (including his best pal, a pair of school chums, and a nutty young Merlin).

Along the way, Cornish’s screenplay keeps up the humor, never forgetting that this new quest is taking place in contemporary times. Who else would think to allow his young stars to use Google Translate to untangle an ancient myth?

Twentieth Century Fox will release “The Kid Who Would Be King” on March 1, 2019. Check out the film’s first trailer, thanks to Empire, below.

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