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New Movies: Release Calendar for May 13, Plus Where to Watch the Latest Films

On offer this week: a pair of IndieWire Critic's Picks from Sundances past, a new joint from Oscar nominee Eskil Vogt, and Rebel Wilson's latest comedic misadventure.

"On the Count of Three"

“On the Count of Three”

UA

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As theaters begin showing signs of life and streaming and VOD options stay hefty, there are more movies (and platforms to watch them on) than ever to sift through, and IndieWire is here to help you do just that each week.

It’s a strange week at the box office — well, a “Strange” one, at least — as the latest Marvel Cinematic Universe outing still seems poised to dominate the multiplex, as no other would-be blockbusters dare to go up against “Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness” in its second week of release. With Cannes and the already buzzed-about “Top Gun: Maverick” on the horizon, this seemingly quiet week of new releases is ripe for discovery. Not in a superhero mood? Wish you could be hitting the Croisette yourself? We’ve got some winners for you.

Among this week’s new releases: a pair of IndieWire Critic’s Picks from Sundances past, the latest from recent Oscar nominee Eskil Vogt, a meat-and-potatoes thriller from John Madden, and Rebel Wilson’s latest comedic misadventure. Frank Marshall has a new documentary, horror classic “Firestarter” gets the remake treatment, and breakout talents Owen Teague and Haley Lu Richardson star in a solid two-hander.

Each film is now available in a theater near you or in the comfort of your own home (or, in some cases, both, the convenience of it all). Browse your options below.

Week of May 9 – May 15

New Films in Theaters

As new movies open in theaters during the COVID-19 pandemic, IndieWire will continue to review them whenever possible. We encourage readers to follow the safety precautions provided by CDC and health authorities. Additionally, our coverage will provide alternative viewing options whenever they are available.

“The Innocents” (directed by Eskil Vogt)
Distributor: IFC Midnight
Where to Find It:
Select theaters, plus various VOD and digital platforms

The latest entry in the child horror genre, Eskil Vogt’s “The Innocents,” opts to take a very different path. Instead of juxtaposing childhood innocence against adult evils, it seamlessly combines the two. The kids we’re supposed to fear may have been born with deadly powers, but they’re simply children in the process of growing up. They play and explore, they experiment and make mistakes. They demonstrate the capacity for profound kindness and cruelty in equal measures. And when they kill people using telekinesis, it’s fair to wonder if the incidents are as preventable as a child falling while running with scissors.

“The Innocents” is a film about childhood as much as it is about murder, sharing as much DNA with “Boyhood” as it does “The Bad Seed.”Specifically, it’s a film about contemporary childhood and, in a dangerous world that forces kids to grow up faster and faster, whether innocence is even still possible. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Montana Story

“Montana Story”

TIFF

“Montana Story” (directed by Scott McGehee and David Siegel)
Distributor: Bleecker Street
Where to Find It:
Select theaters

Both Owen Teague and Haley Lu Richardson are perfectly cast in this sibling drama. Both have the kind of rough and tumble exteriors you’d expect from a person living in the present-day American West. While not a prototypical Western, there are no gunfights or lawmen, this neo-Western covers the new (but familiar) confrontations happening among the mountains and the brush: Indigenous land stripped of resources and white men as a destructive, toxic influence. Amid the big sky, and wide landscapes captured by cinematographer Giles Nuttgens is a modest, tempestuous narrative. Co-directors Scott McGehee and David Siegel’s “Montana Story” is a patient, captivating portrait of the past that stays with us long after the wind stops blowing. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“On the Count of Three” (directed by Jerrod Carmichael) — IndieWire Critic’s Pick
Distributor: United Artists
Where to Find It:
Select theaters, plus various VOD and digital platforms

Jerrod Carmichael’s “On the Count of Three” isn’t super heavy on the kind of koan-like quips that have always lent his confrontational standup comedy its velvet punch, but this one — delivered in the opening minutes of his suicide-dark but violently sweet directorial debut — resonates loud enough to echo throughout the rest of the film: “When you’re a kid they tell you the worst thing in life is to be a quitter. Why? Quitting’s amazing. It just means you get to stop doing something you hate.”

Lifelong best friends Val (Carmichael) and Kevin (Christopher Abbott) are both ready to give up. The first time we see them they’re standing in the parking lot outside an upstate New York strip club at 10:30 a.m. with handguns pointed at each other’s heads as part of a double-suicide pact. Nobody’s laughing, but you can already feel the love between them; something about the look in their eyes reads more like “sisters who are pregnant at the same time” than it does “strangers who are about to shoot each other in the face.” Read IndieWire’s full review.

Pleasure movie

“Pleasure”

Neon

“Pleasure” (directed by Ninja Thyberg) — IndieWire Critic’s Pick
Distributor: Neon
Where to Find It:
 Theaters

A husky-voiced Swedish Kesha look-alike lands at LAX and walks up to the customs booth wearing a furry, multi-colored jacket that screams “look at me!” while also whispering “but not too hard.” We already suspect that she’s a porn star, or at least in Los Angeles to become one — there has to be some reason why the opening credits were soundtracked by the unmistakable sounds of performative deep-throats and flesh T-boning against bare thighs — and so we’re in on the gag when the customs agent asks if our girl is in town for business or pleasure. She waits for a beat, and then responds with the naive smile of someone who doesn’t realize she might be giving the wrong answer: “Pleasure.”

Though never again posed in quite such obvious terms, some form of that question is at the heart of every scene in Ninja Thyberg’s debut feature of the same name, a slick if overly streamlined tale of one woman’s quest to fuck her way through the patriarchy and maybe even out the other side. But “Pleasure” — which is almost by default the most knowing and honest commercial film that’s been made about the modern American porn industry — is determined to avoid framing pleasure and business in binary terms. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Firestarter” (directed by Keith Thomas)
Distributor: Universal 
Where to Find It:
Theaters, plus streaming on Peacock

“Jazz Fest: A New Orleans Story” (directed by Frank Marshall and Ryan Suffern)
Distributor: Sony Pictures Classics 
Where to Find It:
Theaters

“The Last Victim” (directed by Naveen A. Chathapuram)
Distributor: Decal
Where to Find It:
Theaters, plus various VOD and digital platforms

“Mau” (directed by Benji and Jono Bergmann)
Distributor: Greenwich Entertainment
Where to Find It:
Theaters

“Monstrous” (directed by Chris Sivertson)
Distributor: Screen Media
Where to Find It:
Theaters, plus various VOD platforms

New Films on VOD and Streaming, Including Premium Platforms and Virtual Cinema

“Operation Mincemeat” (directed by John Madden)
Distributor:
Netflix
Where to Find It:
Streaming on Netflix

Around halfway through “Operation Mincemeat” — a busy yet somewhat rousing WWII spy thriller based on the English military scheme of the same name — I began to appreciate why this might be John Madden’s best movie since “Shakespeare in Love”: It’s a story about a bunch of British men (and a smattering of British women) who are trying to stage an elaborate show in the face of escalating crises. Except this time, their audience isn’t the Queen of England, a crowd of rowdy peasants, and a pissed-off Colin Firth. This time, their audience is the Nazi intelligence network, and their lead actor is a pissed-off Colin Firth. And unlike “Shakespeare in Love,” much of this story is actually true. How embarrassing for Hitler. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Senior Year”

Netflix

“Senior Year” (directed by Andrew Hardcastle)
Distributor:
Netflix
Where to Find It:
Streaming on Netflix

It stands to reason that Stephanie Conway, the Aussie outcast at the center of Alex Hardcastle’s “Senior Year” would have seen “Never Been Kissed.” Released in 1999 — almost exactly when Hardcastle’s film starts — Drew Barrymore’s high school rom-com followed a well-meaning, dorky kid as she embarks on a do-over after a humiliating teen experience. Such is also the case in “Senior Year,” which lightly resets the charm of “Never Been Kissed” thanks to a wacky coma subplot, but finds little new in the process. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Flint” (directed by Anthony Baxter)
Distributor:
Cargo Releasing
Where to Find It: 
Various digital platforms

“Our Father” (directed by Lucie Jourdan)
Distributor:
Netflix
Where to Find It:
Streaming on Netflix

Check out more films to watch on the next page.

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