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New Movies: Release Calendar for May 29, Plus Where to Watch the Latest Films

Staying home? Good. Looking for something new to watch? Even better!

“The High Note”

Focus Features

Staying home? Good. Looking for something new to watch while you do it? Even better! As the world shifts to accommodate a wide range of in-home viewing options for movie lovers, it’s not just platforms that are expanding, it’s the very type of films they host. There’s more than ever to sift through, and IndieWire is here to help you do just that.

This week’s new releases include Netflix Originals, fresh VOD offerings, new studio releases now available in the comfort of your own home, and a variety of exciting virtual cinema picks. Browse your options below.

Week of May 25 – May 31

New Films on VOD and Streaming

“End of Sentence” (directed by Elfar Adalsteins)
Distributor: Gravitas Ventures
Where to Find It: Rent or buy on iTunes, plus satellite and cable On-Demand and other streaming platforms

Lighter than it sounds — and sharp enough to get away with its schematic plotting — “End of Sentence” doesn’t reverse the usual roles so much as it catches them a bit further along the cycle than we’re used to finding them. When the movie begins, things with the Fogles have already gotten so bad that Frank (John Hawkes) doesn’t even bother to go inside when he and his cancer-stricken wife (Andrea Irvine) visit their son at the Alabama prison where Sean (Logan Lerman) has been locked up for the last few years. … A lesser film might have forced that resentment out into the open through a series of histrionic screaming matches, but “End of Sentence” doesn’t pretend that it can fix 30 years of pain in the span of three acts and 90 minutes. While things get plotty down the home stretch as this sober two-hander threatens to veer into “Little Miss Sunshine” territory, Michael Armbruster’s soft-footed script mines the brunt of its truth from quieter moments that Lerman and Hawkes are given space to inhabit. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The High Note” (directed by Nisha Ganatra)
Distributor: Focus Features
Where to Find It: Rent on iTunes, Vudu, GooglePlay, FandangoNow, plus satellite and cable On-Demand and other streaming platforms

While “The High Note” is ostensibly built on the relationship between its central women (a good, different idea), a series of silly contrivances, unwelcome twists, and off-kilter pacing ensure it too often forgets what could have made it special. At least stars Dakota Johnson and Tracee Ellis Ross are occasionally allowed to make some magic, an inspired pairing that finds the actresses doing their best work together (when their characters are separated, that’s a different story). The strength of the pair’s chemistry — with Johnson cast as the smart but starry-eyed Maggie and Ross doing a lighter spin on her own real-life mother’s mythos as the larger-than-life Grace — helps guide shaky character development, though “The High Note” is less successful at making its stars shine when they interact with others. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“I Will Make You Mine”

“I Will Make You Mine” (directed by Lynn Chen)
Distributor: Gravitas Ventures
Where to Find It: Rent or buy on iTunes, Prime Video, GooglePlay, Vimeo on Demand, Vudu, YouTube, plus satellite and cable On-Demand and other streaming platforms

A typically winsome new addition to what has now become one of cinema’s most casual trilogies, “I Will Make You Mine” is a long-awaited gift for a small cult of fans: those who’ve been following Goh Nakamura’s romantic misadventures since “Surrogate Valentine” first introduced them to (a fictionalized version of) the lovelorn singer-songwriter in 2011. Nakamura returned shortly thereafter for a more grounded and heartsick sequel called “Daylight Savings,” but the “dreamsicle pop” musician has been missing from screens ever since, leaving us to wonder if he ever settled down or if he was consigned to spend all eternity crooning about the ways he almost found the right girl at the right time. Not only does “I Will Make You Mine” answer that question once and for all, but this shaggy and self-contained little ditty also asks it with enough warmth to seduce people who don’t know a thing about the sordid backstory that binds these characters together. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“On the Record” (directed by Kirby Dick and Amy Ziering)
Distributor: HBO Max
Where to Find It: Streaming on HBO Max

At times it seems as if “On the Record” might have benefited from exploring a wider range of accusations to bolster Drew Dixon’s claims, but her central role imbues the movie with an affecting emotional foundation. With its closing act, the filmmakers capture the full equation from the inside out: how #MeToo survivors experience the process of going public and watching their stories become part of a broader debate, and the catharsis that comes from victims finding each other in the aftermath. This time, Kirby Dick and Amy Ziering have put less effort into exposing systematic evil than in celebrating the value of taking it on — and bemoaning the forces that try to stop that result. “When powerful women go away, it’s a loss for all of us,” one subject tells the camera. “On the Record,” however, fixates on the potential they still have to come back. Read IndieWire’s full review.

The Vast of Night

“The Vast of Night”

Amazon Studios

“The Vast of Night” (directed by Andrew Patterson)
Distributor: Amazon
Where to Find It: Streaming on Amazon Prime Video

While the film offers a familiar B-movie story, it does so with heart and genuine sincerity, never striving for irony and to put anything in quotation marks. It’s that earnestness that makes “The Vast of Night” so appealing. It’s a clever exercise in no-frills science fiction that should please fans of the genre, but it’s more than just a sci-fi exercise thanks to a script that prioritizes, and cares about, its characters. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Films Available via Virtual Cinema

Learn more about virtual cinemas offerings right here.

“Papicha” (directed by Mounia Meddour)
Distributor: Distrib Films
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

“Plimpton! Starring George Plimpton as Himself” (directed by Tom Bean and Luke Poling)
Distributor: Laemmle / Zeller Films
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

“Stage: The Culinary Internship” (directed by Abby Ainsworth)
Distributor: Cargo Film
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

“Ursula von Rydingsvard: Into Her Own” (directed by Daniel Traub)
Distributor: Icarus Films
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Theatrically Released Films on VOD and Streaming

Once Were Brothers

“Once Were Brothers”

Elliott Landy/LandyVision, Inc

“Once Were Brothers: Robbie Robertson and the Band” (directed by Daniel Roher)
Distributor: Magnolia Pictures
Where to Find It: Rent or buy on all major satellite and cable On-Demand and other streaming platforms

Bolstered by an enviable array of talking heads (from Bruce Springsteen and Van Morrison to Band obsessive and executive producer Martin Scorsese), the history of The Band energetically unspools, with Robertson gamely holding the center. Still, even Band neophytes who might not know so many of its members have passed away over the years will be unable to dismiss the early, gaping holes. Robertson has every right to tell his version of events, but by the time a second talking head is introduced as a “friend of Levon Helm” or Roher leans on archival interview footage of the drummer and singer clearly never meant for his film, it grates. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Check out information about the rest of May’s newest releases below.

Week of May 18 – May 24

New Films on VOD and Streaming

“Inheritance” (directed by Vaughn Stein)
Distributor: Vertical Entertainment
Where to Find It: Rent or buy on iTunes, Prime Video, plus satellite and cable On-Demand and other streaming platforms

A mostly predictable thriller, “Inheritance” spends the majority of its nearly two-hour running time doling out formulaic twists and undoing seemingly essential elements of its main characters, but patient audiences might be rewarded by its occasionally unnerving final act. Strong work from star Lily Collins, who manages to ride out the film’s oddest missteps, helps, though co-star Simon Pegg is less successful at the big swings required of his character (and his very, very bad wig). Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Kate Nash: Underestimate the Girl” (directed by Amy Goldstein)
Distributor: BBC3
Where to Find It: Rent on Alamo On Demand

A desire to grow creatively led to her label dropping her, and Goldstein’s film opens with Nash fighting hard to come back on her own terms. It’s a tough story, but an old one, and audiences will have to wait for half the documentary to zip by — and it does! Nash is very easy to invest in, even in surface-level observations — before the other shoe drops and “Underestimate the Girl” goes somewhere much more raw and rewarding. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Lovebirds” (directed by Michael Showalter)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

The truth is that “The Lovebirds” makes all too much sense on Netflix. Michael Showalter’s follow-up to “The Big Sick” is as flat and algorithmic as his last rom-com was poignant and alive. The only thing the two films really have in common is a winning performance from Kumail Nanjiani, who co-wrote himself the role of a lifetime the last time around, and elevates the sketch of a character he’s playing here with just the right amount of everyman anguish and silent alarm. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Military Wives” (directed by Peter Cattaneo)
Distributor: Bleecker Street
Where to Find It: Rent or buy on iTunes or FandangoNow, streaming on Hulu, plus satellite and cable On-Demand and other streaming platforms

A nice enough time that never really aspires to be anything more, “Military Wives” isn’t just the kind of movie that ends with Sister Sledge’s “We Are Family,” it’s the kind of movie that ends with the entire cast singing along. Steered right down the middle by “Full Monty” director Peter Cattaneo (who could make this sort of feel-good fluff with his knickers around his ankles, and shoots it with such basic instincts that you’d almost believe he actually did), this semi-factual charmer tells the true enough story of some British army spouses who learn to sing through their sorrows. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Painter and the Thief” (directed by Benjamin Ree)
Distributor: Neon
Where to Find It: Rent or buy on iTunes, Prime Video, FandangoNow, GooglePlay, and Vudu, plus virtual cinema, and streaming on Hulu

“The Painter and the Thief” recognizes how art — ostensibly, empathetic art most of all — has a nasty habit of flattening its subject in order to fulfill its audience, and the film does what it can to complicate the privileged gaze of looking at someone like they can’t look at you back. The worst version of this movie would have simply leveled the playing field and let a cold story of artistic exploitation thaw into an unusual friendship. However, a terrible accident comes along to reshuffle the deck at a critical moment, and the director is unafraid to reckon with how this new trauma might destabilize the painter and the thief’s established codependency. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Trip to Greece” (directed by Michael Winterbottom)
Distributor: IFC Films
Where to Find It: Rent on Prime Video, rent or buy on iTunes, plus satellite and cable On-Demand and other streaming platforms

Now arriving at its fourth (and allegedly final) installment, Michael Winterbottom’s “The Trip” series has established Rob Brydon and Steve Coogan as one of the funniest comic duos this side of Laurel and Hardy, but these movies — for all of their dueling Michael Caine impressions and Michelin-delicious meals — have always been suffused with a deep and abiding sense of sadness. They’re not shy about that: The regret, loneliness, and middle-aged malaise come wrapped in a contraceptive of “Philomena” jokes and belittling jabs about Brydon’s career as a “light entertainer,” but the darkness is ever-present, like a backseat passenger these men drive around during their circular road trips around Europe. Instead of a laugh track, every punchline is followed by an existential twang of self-doubt. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Ovid and the Art of Love” (directed by Esmé von Hoffman)
Distributor: Level 33 Entertainment
Where to Find It: Buy on all major satellite and cable On-Demand and other streaming platforms

Films Available via Virtual Cinema

Learn more about virtual cinemas offerings right here.

“Diana Kennedy: Nothing Fancy” (directed by Elizabeth Carroll)
Distributor: Greenwich Entertainment
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Diana Kennedy’s no-nonsense attitude, passionate takes on everything from sex to sustainability, and encyclopedic knowledge of regional Mexican cuisine make her a perfect documentary subject. With director Elizabeth Carroll as skilled sous-chef, “Diana Kennedy: Nothing Fancy” brings bold flavors together to serve a scrumptious delight of a film. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Joan of Arc” (directed by Bruno Dumont)
Distributor: Kimstim Films
Where to Find It: Rent through Film at Lincoln Center’s virtual cinema

“Joan of Arc,” the filmmaker’s bizarre and inquisitive look at the famed young martyr in the final years of her war against the British, benefits from a working familiarity of the vision behind the camera. Technically, it’s as much a part of a growing Bruno Dumont franchise as “Li’l Quinquin,” as “Joan of Arc” follows his 2017 “Jeanette: The Childhood of Joan of Arc,” both chronologically and in terms of the Brechtian devices used to find new pathways into a centuries-old tale. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“American Trial: The Eric Garner Story” (directed by Roee Messinger)
Distributor: Passion River Films
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

“Lucky Grandma” (directed by Sasie Sealy)
Distributor: Good Deed Entertainment
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

“Mysteries of Lisbon” (directed by Raul Ruiz)
Distributor: Music Box Films
Where to Find It: Rent through Film at Lincoln Center’s virtual cinema

Week of May 11 – May 17

New Films on VOD and Streaming

“Capone” (directed by Josh Trank)
Distributor: Vertical Entertainment
Where to Find It: Rent or buy on iTunes, Prime Video, FandangoNow, Vudu, plus satellite and cable On-Demand and other streaming platforms

A necrotic gangster biopic that doubles as one of modern cinema’s most unforgiving self-portraits, Josh Trank’s “Capone” does for Scarface what Gus Van Sant’s “Last Days” did for Kurt Cobain: Not a lot, and in excruciating detail. But while both films offer a bleak look at the final chapter of a fabled rock star’s life, this one has the chutzpah to be so much bleaker; if Van Sant’s movie was strung out, Trank’s is utterly zombified. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Castle in the Ground” (directed by Joey Klein)
Distributor: Gravitas Ventures
Where to Find It: Rent or buy on iTunes, Prime Video, plus satellite and cable On-Demand and other streaming platforms

Even as “Castle in the Ground” begins to fray and fall apart, Joey Klein’s dour but gripping opioid drama remains believable for how perfectly it dovetails with its grieving protagonist. Like 19-year-old Henry Fine (Alex Wolff) — a nice Jewish boy who lives with his dying mom (Neve Campbell) in a necrotic Sudbury apartment complex — the film is sensitive and mesmeric and oh so close to moments of cathartic beauty. And like 19-year-old Henry Fine — a grieving orphan who inherits his mom’s leftover OxyContin and fentanyl patches after she dies from Hodgkin’s lymphoma (or from an overdose of the treatment she’s been prescribed for it) — Klein’s film grows distressed, unsure of itself, and lost in a trite crime thriller that spirals away from what made it special in the first place. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Have a Good Trip: Adventures in Psychedelics” (directed by Donick Cary)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

It can be a lot of (semi-sadistic) fun to watch someone have a bad trip, and it can be a lot of (shared) fun to listen to celebrities reminisce about the bad trips they’ve survived in the past, but it’s generally agonizing to sit down and do either of those things for more than an hour. That sad fact of life proves to be an insurmountable problem for Donick Cary’s “Have a Good Trip: Adventures in Psychedelics,” an exasperating Netflix documentary so high on its own supply that it starts to see things that aren’t there — namely, the entertainment value in watching a bunch of famous people tell interchangeable stories about seeing the carpets move or whatever. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Scoob!” (directed by Tony Cervone)
Distributor: Warner Bros.
Where to Find It: Rent or buy on iTunes, Prime Video, Vudu, YouTube, FandangoNow, Microsoft, GooglePlay, and more

Ignore the weird Simon Cowell gags. Despite its rocky start, Tony Cervone’s “Scoob!,” eventually moves past squeezing in gags about modern tastemakers (do kids even know who Simon Cowell is?) to become a loving, if silly, introduction to the stars of Hanna-Barbera’s wide-ranging animated universe. Part origin story of the Mystery, Inc. team (Scooby-Doo and the rest of them, for newbies), part Hanna-Barbera homage, the animated feature is a charming enough diversion that adds to the appeal of the original show. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Wrong Missy” (directed by Tyler Spindel)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

A gross-out comedy masquerading only in the flimsiest sense as a romance, “The Wrong Missy” still knows its way around genre convention, but Tyler Spindel and company seem compelled to use those expectations to tee up cruel gags that do little to advance the film’s plot or central romance. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Blood and Money” (directed by John Barr)
Distributor: Screen Media
Where to Find It: Rent or buy on all major satellite and cable On-Demand and other streaming platforms

“Proximity” (directed by Eric Demeusy)
Distributor: Shout! Factory
Where to Find It: Rent or buy on all major satellite and cable On-Demand and other streaming platforms

Films Available via Virtual Cinema

Learn more about virtual cinemas offerings right here.

“Alice” (directed by Josephine Mackerras)
Distributor: Monument Releasing
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

The opening minutes of “Alice” make the case for Emilie Piponnier to be a movie star, and the rest of the movie keeps it up. As the eponymous centerpiece of the 2019 SXSW Grand Jury Prize winner, Piponnier dominates every frame, with a mesmerizing screen presence that pushes the drama well beyond its formulaic premise and visible microbudget constraints. Nevertheless, French director Josephine Mackerras’ understated debut operates on the same intimate wavelength as Piponnier’s simmering desperation — and, eventually, her newfound sense of pride — as a woman who becomes a sex worker to support her child. That premise may not change the world, but “Alice” succeeds as a sturdy window into one woman’s quest to take control of her oppressive world. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Dykes, Camera, Action!” (directed by Caroline Berler)
Distributor: Frameline Distribution
Where to Find It: Rent through Roxie Cinema

At a breezy 60 minutes, the film has much in common with that other lesbian tradition, the potluck, in terms of the topics it covers. There’s a little o’ this, a little o’ that, plus plenty of vegan and gluten-free options. Though the history of wider LGBTQ cinema has been told in greater depth before, namely in Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman’s 1995 opus “The Celluloid Closet,” sometimes it’s nice to have a little something of your own. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Fourteen” (directed by Dan Sallitt)
Distributor: Grasshopper Film
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Lo-fi and even lower budget, as per the writer/director/editor’s usual custom (he reveres the deceptively absent visual aesthetics of Eric Rohmer, Hong Sang-soo, and the other grandmasters of casual suffering), Sallitt’s elliptical new film isn’t always pretty, nor is it certain that “Fourteen” would have suffered for having a more robust color palette or a compositional design that was less afraid of calling attention to itself. But even those viewers who don’t tend to fetishize the consumer-grade stylings of the digital age might find them to be more of a feature than a bug in this instance, as Sallitt effectively uses the DIY veneer to flatten time until you can feel the cracks start to show between its two major characters. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“The Wolf House” (directed by Cristóbal León and Joaquín Cociña)
Distributor: KimSim
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Theatrically Released Films on VOD and Streaming

“Fantasy Island” (directed by Jeff Wadlow)
Distributor: Sony Pictures Releasing
Where to Find It: Rent or buy on all major satellite and cable On-Demand and other streaming platforms

There’s a real whiff of desperation to the way that Blumhouse has dusted it off, and this slapdash programmer is such a complete shrug of a movie that it feels almost defiantly apathetic from the moment it starts. Dumb in ways that range from inane to insulting, but always growing duller by the minute, this new “Fantasy Island” is only a few minutes old before your greatest wish is to be watching literally anything else. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Invisible Man” (directed by Leigh Whannell)
Distributor: Universal Pictures
Where to Find It: Rent or buy on all major satellite and cable On-Demand and other streaming platforms

The best genre films play on society’s most pressing fears, but in his limp reworking of H.G. Wells’ “The Invisible Man,” Leigh Whannell tries melding everything from gaslighting to anxieties around data privacy into a crude technological thriller that is part sci-fi, part horror, and all-around mess. Why Hollywood’s favorite unhinged woman Elisabeth Moss chose to lend her considerable talents is a mystery bigger than how her stalker ex managed to make himself invisible. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Photograph” (directed by Stella Meghie)
Distributor: Universal Pictures
Where to Find It: Rent or buy on all major satellite and cable On-Demand and other streaming platforms

Filmmaker Stella Meghie offers up a cross-generational romance that imagines a pair of irrevocably linked relationships, both bolstered by stellar casting and the kind of chemistry woefully rare in studio features (which have long appeared to cast romantic leads through a random process that finds far more hits than misses). And yet the open-hearted drama, titled “The Photograph” but perhaps better referred to as “The Photographer” or even “The Letter,” can never quite bridge its individual stories, awkwardly shuffling between the pair and never giving either their full due. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Week of May 4 – May 10

New Films on VOD and Streaming

“Becoming” (directed by Nadia Hallgren)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

At first, the movie comes across as something of a companion piece to Obama’s autobiography of the same name, the New York Times bestseller from which Hallgren’s film borrows its title, “Becoming” eventually collapses into oddly disjointed storytelling. The first act follows the former First Lady and her team as they embark on a busy book tour, complete with stadium-sized gatherings that feature Obama in conversation with a variety of heavy-hitting moderators (the film opens with Oprah Winfrey introducing her to their hometown Chicago crowd, that’s how starry this thing is). Packed with enough behind-the-scenes shots of Obama and her team winding their way through heavily guarded underground tunnels, it’s almost enough to convince viewers they’re getting a real peek behind the curtain. Almost. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Driveways” (directed by Andrew Ahn)
Distributor: FilmRise
Where to Find It: Rent or buy on iTunes, Prime Video, GooglePlay, Microsoft, plus satellite and cable On-Demand and other streaming platforms

In “Driveways,” director Andrew Ahn trusts his actors to fill in the considerable gaps in Hannah Bos and Paul Thureen’s minimalist script. But actors, even ones as brilliant as these, are not magicians; they cannot create meaning from nowhere. Ahn guides his gentle second feature with a measured hand, but he and his adorable kid protagonist can’t jolt the sleepy narrative out of its familiar comfort zone. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“How to Build a Girl” (directed by Coky Giedroyc)
Distributor: IFC Films
Where to Find It: Rent or buy on iTunes, Prime Video, plus satellite and cable On-Demand and other streaming platforms

How do you build a girl? Coky Giedroyc’s film offers one answer: with a lot of pain. Johanna (Beanie Feldstein) may be forced to cycle through the necessary plot points to grow into something new, but the film lets her get ugly and mean and messy on the way there, with Feldstein still winning enough to ensure we’re rooting for her. The adventure starts with her, and she carries it through to somewhere unexpectedly delightful, if not necessary: the shining promise of womanhood, on her terms. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Porno” (directed by Keola Racela)
Distributor: Fangoria
Where to Find It: Rent or buy on iTunes, plus satellite and cable On-Demand and other streaming platforms

This gory teen comedy blends laughably outrageous carnage with a legitimately scary plot to delightful ends. Throw in a winking fetish for cinephile culture and audiences are sure to go wild for the gutsy film. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Rewind” (directed by Sasha Neulinger)
Distributor: Grizzly Creek Films
Where to Find It: iTunes, Prime Video, GooglePlay, Microsoft, plus satellite and cable On-Demand and other streaming platforms

“Rewind,” as indelibly as any film ever made, illustrates how the very process of investigating your own past can be a trauma unto itself. And it does so by weighing that pain against the (potentially even greater) trauma of repressing the most awful truths, holding the hurt in, and using your body as a vessel to preserve the kind of darkness that should never be projected onto anyone else. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Spaceship Earth” (directed by Matt Wolf)
Distributor: Neon
Where to Find It: Hulu, Alamo On Demand, and various virtual cinemas (including IndieWire!)

“Spaceship Earth” touches down as a grounded and even clinical analysis of our natural skepticism towards dreamers — of how our hope can sour into hostility as soon as it loses an iota of its shine. And it might linger in viewers’ minds in a way that more explicit climate movies have not, because it confronts America’s seemingly irreconcilable disconnect between current actions and future consequences without getting stuck in the middle. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Valley Girl” (directed by Rachel Lee Goldenberg)
Distributor: Orion Classics/UAR
Where to Find It: Rent or buy on iTunes, Prime Video, plus satellite and cable On-Demand and other streaming platforms

Martha Coolidge’s original film, which starred Deborah Foreman and a young Nicolas Cage, might not seem like the most obvious choice for a remake, but Rachel Lee Goldenberg’s clever homage finds a new way into the material, by turning it into a lively jukebox musical. Goldenberg’s film manages to evoke the spirit of coming of age during a singular cultural moment. Alongside screenwriter Amy Talkington, she has even devised a smart way to telegraph that concept early on, imagining this “Valley Girl” as something of a fairy tale retelling from a contemporary vantage point. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Arkansas” (directed by Clark Duke)
Distributor: Lionsgate
Where to Find It: Rent or buy on Prime Video, GooglePlay, YouTube, plus satellite and cable On-Demand and other streaming platforms

“Blue Story” (directed by Andrew Onwubolu AKA Rapman)
Distributor: Paramount Pictures
Where to Find It: Rent or buy on Prime Video, GooglePlay, YouTube, plus satellite and cable On-Demand and other streaming platforms

“The Plagiarists” (directed by Peter Parlow)
Distributor: KimStim
Where to Find It: Rent or buy on iTunes, Prime Video, plus satellite and cable On-Demand and other streaming platforms

“Walkaway Joe” (directed by Tom Wright)
Distributor: Quiver Distribution
Where to Find It: Rent or buy on iTunes, Prime Video, plus satellite and cable On-Demand and other streaming platforms

Films Available via Virtual Cinema

Learn more about virtual cinemas offerings right here.

“Clementine” (directed by Lara Jean Gallagher)
Distributor: Oscilloscope
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

More “Persona” than “Portrait of a Lady on Fire” (though Sophia Takal’s much sharper “Always Shine” might be its closest relative), “Clementine” is pulled out of the starting blocks by a dark sexual charge that’s strong enough to carry the entire story until it’s snuffed out in the third act. Karen drives to her ex’s lakeside cabin in the remote forests of Oregon, literally and figuratively plunging into Twin Peaks territory as the landscape assumes the same ominous possibility as her mind. When Karen breaks into her ex’s house, she finds that she’s not the only intruder: The owner is nowhere to be found, but a precocious local teen named Lana (“Euphoria” breakout Sydney Sweeney) is sunbathing on the dock. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“CRSHD” (directed by Emily Cohn)
Distributor: Lightyear Entertainment
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Emily Cohn’s “CRSHD,” a shaggy lo-fi buddy comedy built around a classic “let’s lose our virginity!” scheme, has a brilliant answer for the social media age. Set during the waning days of their first year at college, “CRSHD” follows a trio of best pals as they attempt to make romantic magic happen with a slew of possible paramours as helped (and, occasionally, hindered) by their Very Online lives. Cohn’s big idea for how to bring Facebook, Tinder, even text messaging to life is a daring one, but it works: each character appears on the screen, reading out their messages and profile bits (mistakes and all), adding emotion and personality to otherwise digital exchanges. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“On a Magical Night” (directed by Christophe Honoré)
Distributor: Strand Releasing
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

A zesty palate cleanser of sorts after his wrenching “Sorry Angel” — but in some ways a much weightier film than writer-director Christophe Honoré has left himself the strength to carry — “On a Magical Night” is a fanciful tale of marriage and its malcontents; a muted sex farce that unfolds like an overwhelmingly French twist on “A Christmas Carol” for people who are sick of their spouses. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Mossville: When Great Trees Fall” (directed by Alex Glustrom)
Distributor: Passion River
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Theatrically Released Films on VOD and Streaming

“Greed” (directed by Michael Winterbottom)
Distributor: Sony Pictures Classics
Where to Find It: Rent or buy on Prime Video, YouTube, GooglePlay, plus satellite and cable On-Demand and other streaming platforms

“Greed” is good enough — if only just. A serrated but superficial portrait of how capitalism distances the rich from its consequences, Michael Winterbottom’s damning sendup is often right on the money, but its broadside attacks on the ultra-rich are too obvious to draw any blood or raise our hackles. What more could you really expect from a bitter comedy about a Branson-esque billionaire named Rich McGreedy? Okay, technically the business tycoon that Steve Coogan plays is called Sir Richard McCreadi, but no one in the movie (nor anyone watching it) is fooled by the spelling; Winterbottom isn’t exactly trying to get away with it. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Hope Gap” (directed by William Nicholson)
Distributor: Roadside Attractions
Where to Find It: Satellite and cable On-Demand and other streaming platforms

Hope is indeed in short supply in William Thompson’s fussy, dour divorce drama “Hope Gap.” Adapted from Thompson’s own play (the more intriguingly titled “The Retreat from Moscow”), “Hope Gap” picks up nearly three decades into the marriage of Grace (Annette Bening) and Edward (Bill Nighy), and about 10 minutes before the union’s total collapse. Run through with the requisite tropes of a divorce drama — the tear-stained arrival of divorce papers, spying on the “other woman,” talking trash to the child caught in the middle — “Hope Gap” finds little new ground to tread, though Bening’s ability to transform a dull role bolsters the film’s second half. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Saint Frances” (directed by Alex Thompson)
Distributor: Oscilloscope
Where to Find It: Rent or buy on iTunes, Prime Video, FandangoNow, plus satellite and cable On-Demand and other streaming platforms

The shape of Alex Thompson’s winning “Saint Frances” is familiar enough: a disaffected and unattached millennial finds purpose and meaning in an unexpected connection with a spunky kid who forces her to grow up and face the real world in all its terrifying glory. Cute kids are easy outs in modern cinema (“do you know that the human head weighs eight pounds?”); so are ennui-laden young adults more adept at scrolling social media than carving out a career, but Thompson and “Saint Frances” writer and star Kelly O’Sullivan turn their premise into something wise and witty. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker” (directed by J.J. Abrams)
Distributor: Disney
Where to Find It: Streaming on Disney+

“Rise of Skywalker” isn’t even a movie in the traditional sense so much as the blockbuster version of a Jedi mind trick — a hodgepodge of cameos and callbacks, snazzy lightsaber brawls and shrieking TIE fighters — all glued together by John Williams’ exuberant score and calibrated to create the perception of the ultimate gratifying finale. But it’s more the idea of that thing than the thing itself, zipping along with enjoyable bits and pieces but reducing the big picture to an amalgam of half-hearted ideas. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Check out information about the rest of 2020’s newest home releases on the next page.

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