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New Movies: Release Calendar for November 20, Plus Where to Watch the Latest Films

Staying home? Good. Looking for something new to watch? Even better!

sound of metal

“Sound of Metal”

Amazon

Week of October 26 – November 1

New Films on VOD and Streaming (And in Select Theaters)

As new movies open in theaters during the COVID-19 pandemic, IndieWire will continue to review them whenever possible. We encourage readers to follow the safety precautions provided by CDC and health authorities. Additionally, our coverage will provide alternative viewing options whenever they are available.

“City Hall” (directed by Frederick Wiseman)
Distributor: Zipporah Films
Where to Find It: Select theaters (virtual cinema options to come in following weeks)

Every Frederick Wiseman movie starts like a dare. Though the 90-year-old documentary legend has been chronicling social institutions ever since 1967’s “Titicut Follies,” many of his projects casually drift through three or four hours of dense, layered portraits following the people behind vast organizational forces. Ironically, this has actually made his work even more valuable with time, and “City Hall,” which clocks in at four hours and 32 minutes, is no exception. As attention spans dwindle and the complex mess of American governance grows murkier than ever, Wiseman’s immersive dive into Boston’s city services ignores the pressure to dumb things down and marvels at the complexity of a system designed to make the world run right. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Come Play” (directed by Jacob Chase)
Distributor: Focus Features
Where to Find It: Select theaters

As if parents don’t have enough to worry about these days, now there’s a lonely demon named Larry hiding in your kid’s iPad and trying to lure them into some kind of hell dimension. So goes the rusty hook of Jacob Chase’s “Come Play,” an uninspired jolt machine of a horror movie that’s being dumped into theaters on Halloween weekend, where its tepid scares will be forced to compete against the abject terror of breathing the same air as a few reckless strangers. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Craft: Legacy” (directed by Zoe Lister-Jones)
Distributor: Sony Pictures, Blumhouse Productions
Where to Find It: PVOD and various digital platforms

Like its predecessor, “The Craft: Legacy” works best for those willing to go along with its particular vibe, and while it seems likely to garner blowback from viewers who resist the idea that horror films (and witchcraft-centric ones in particular) have always been interested in issues relating to misogyny, Zoe Lister-Jones and her teen witches gamely tackle and skewer such concepts. The result is an entertaining and insightful mashup of tropes, both respectful of what came before and willing to try new tricks. Being a weirdo, it seems, has never gone out of fashion, but now it has a different kind of future to conjure up. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“His House” (directed by Remi Weekes)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

One of the best debuts of the year, Remi Weekes’ shrewd, tender, and sometimes terrifying “His House” begins with a clever premise — the immigrant experience as a horror movie — and expands on that idea in knowing and unexpected ways. Whereas a lesser film might have condescended to these characters and mined easy scares from the indignities of the assimilation process, Weekes’ dingy chiller implicitly recognizes that life would be difficult for a grieving Black couple who show up in England with nothing but each other and a few trinkets to their names, and it never stops using its genre as a torch to illuminate the specific forms those shadowed difficulties might take. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Holidate” (directed by John Whitesell)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

The characters trapped in John Whitesell’s “Holidate” may not know they’re in a romantic comedy, but they sure know the perimeters of one. Sloane (Emma Roberts) and Jackson (Luke Bracey) are barely into their first encounter before they start yammering about the usual cinematic expectations of the genre — including the exact ones that will unfold in the film to come — as well as the very same outdated “men are from Mars, women are from Venus” concepts that have bolstered such movies since film history invented them. But while plenty of rom-coms have tackled this tongue-in-cheek approach before, “Holidate” never attempts to subvert the very things it mocks, instead opting for pure convention the whole way through. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The True Adventures of Wolfboy” (directed by Martin Krejcí)
Distributor: Vertical Entertainment
Where to Find It: VOD and various digital platforms

“The True Adventures of Wolfboy” feels like the movie Tim Burton would have made 30 years ago if he hadn’t directed “Edward Scissorhands” instead. Director Martin Krejcí’s first feature has the fairy-tale surrealism and penchant for oddball outsiders that distinguished Burton’s work, as well as a similar lighthearted quirkiness that balances the undercurrents of gothic dread. Above all, “Wolfboy” suggests “Scissorhands” for the way it grounds an outlandish figure in credible emotional stakes, making the case for a sincere coming-of-age drama along the way. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“The Accidental President” (directed by James Fletcher)
Distributor: Intervention Media
Where to Find It: VOD and various digital platforms

“The Donut King” (directed by Alice Gu)
Distributor: Greenwich Entertainment
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus virtual cinema options

“Fishbowl” (directed by Stephen and Alexa Kinigopoulos)
Distributor: Gravitas Ventures
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus VOD and various digital platforms

“Kaali Khuhi” (directed by Terrie Samundra)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

“November” (directed by Phillip Youmans)
Distributor: The Shed, Tribeca Studios
Where to Find It: Streaming on TheShed.org, November 1 through November 7

“Spell” (directed by Mark Tonderai)
Distributor: Paramount Pictures
Where to Find It: PVOD and various digital platforms

Films Available via Virtual Cinema

Learn more about virtual cinemas offerings right here.

“Fire Will Come” (directed by Oliver Laxe)
Distributor: KimStim
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Rugged, elemental, and restrained to a degree that suggests its director finds poetry in even the simplest things (his camera lingers on rolling fog or the face of a farm animal with a reverence that might prove trying for those not on his wavelength), “Fire Will Come” is a slight but evocative meditation on making peace with something that isn’t possible to understand nor extinguish. It starts with a deceptively incendiary premise: A quiet, middle-aged man named Amador (found actor Amador Arias) is released from prison after serving time for arson, and returns to a mountainous hometown that’s still feeling a bit hot under the collar about the pyromaniac who set it ablaze. From there, the film prepares you for the promise of its English-language title by slowly turning the entire world into tinder. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Madre” (directed by Rodrigo Sorogoyen)
Distributor: Strand Releasing
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Know you’re in for a wild emotional ride when the word “mother” is in the title of a movie. Darren Aronofsky wrought biblical hell upon us with “mother!,” Bong Joon Ho showed us that you could be perhaps too good a mom in “Mother,” and Pedro Almodóvar painted a ravishing ode to screen goddesses with “All About My Mother.” (Oh, and in the French film “Ma Mère,” Isabelle Huppert dabbles in incest.) Enter Rodrigo Sorogoyen’s “Madre” into the canon of warped movies about motherhood. Marta Nieto turns in a great performance in this intimate yet epically shot drama about how a mother’s worst nightmare sparks a fleeting but unforgettable connection. What could’ve been an exploitative affair between a mother and the doppelgänger of her lost child is instead a certainly unsettling but strangely touching new movie. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Us Kids” (directed by Kim A. Snyder)
Distributor: Alamo Drafthouse Virtual Cinema
Where to Find It: Rent for free on Alamo On Demand

Snyder casts her net too wide to paint a meaningful portrait of the kids, and follows them too closely to provide much lasting insight into the context of their campaign. And yet, the spirit of their mission shines through. Their beautiful obstinance; their unbounded energy; their steadfast refusal to accept the prevailing wisdom that un-fucking the future is too complicated for a kid to understand. It may not be possible for a film to adequately convey the pain of America’s gun problem, but this one is proof enough that a film can distill the essence of a solution. “Am I brave, or was I just hard-headed?” Emma González asks herself at one point, echoing a question that must have confronted Snyder at some point during the making of her last two films. If nothing else, “Us Kids” affirms there’s a bravery to being hard-headed, and a hard-headedness to being brave. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Week of October 19 – October 25

New Films on VOD and Streaming (And in Select Theaters)

As new movies open in theaters during the COVID-19 pandemic, IndieWire will continue to review them whenever possible. We encourage readers to follow the safety precautions provided by CDC and health authorities. Additionally, our coverage will provide alternative viewing options whenever they are available.

“American Selfie” (directed by Alexandra Pelosi)
Distributor: MTV Documentary Film
Where to Find It: Showtime

Alexandra Pelosi’s documentary “American Selfie” is really a selfie of its own, a snapshot of America today, a testament to the things we’re sharing, for better and (mostly) worse. Despite an early flirtation with quite literally covering the culture of “selfies” — it opens with an energetic run of interviews with Chicago tourists, all of whom are far too eager to talk about their personal selfie philosophy — Pelosi’s documentary goes much further. Billed as a “12-month journey” through America during a particularly tumultuous year, one that Pelosi posits forever changed American consumers’ relationships with the smartphone, “American Selfie” is an urgent look at a fractured country and culture. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Bad Hair” (directed by Justin Simien)
Distributor: Hulu
Where to Find It: Streaming on Hulu

The plight of black women and their hair has birthed enough cinematic investigations to yield its own subgenre, from Chris Rock’s astute 2009 documentary “Good Hair” to the 2020 Oscar-nominated animated short “Hair Love.” These endearing cultural explorations are mere preludes to the exuberance of “Bad Hair,” a rambunctious, overindulgent comedy-horror excursion from “Dear White People” director Justin Simien. Equal parts vintage Brian De Palma thriller and race-centric corporate fashion satire in the spirit of “Putney Swope,” Simien’s ludicrous ’80s-spiced supernatural B-movie doesn’t know when to quit, much like the demonic weave at its center. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Bruce Springsteen’s Letter to You” (directed by Thom Zimny)
Distributor: AppleTV+
Where to Find It: Streaming on AppleTV+

Despite the funereal tone of its black-and-white cinematography and the searching way that its star occasionally mutters about “souls” between songs, “Bruce Springsteen’s Letter to You” is an upbeat portrait of someone who isn’t going anywhere, even when he leaves us. It doesn’t feel like a goodbye so much as a full-throated declaration that Springsteen will never have to make one. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Borat Subsequent Moviefilm” (directed by Jason Woliner)
Distributor: Amazon
Where to Find It: Streaming on Amazon Prime Video

“Borat Subsequent Moviefilm” ends with a plea to vote, against the backdrop of the most damning visual to come out of this horrible year. It’s enlightening to watch Sacha Baron Cohen come closer than he has before to breaking the fourth wall and pointing out his intentions in the material itself. Fourteen years after his last romp, Borat isn’t exactly woke, but his time has come: This searing brand of humor has never felt more essential. Blending activism with entertainment, Baron Cohen’s best movie to date gives us new reasons to be afraid of the world, but also permission to laugh at it. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Lupin III: The First” (directed by Yamazaki Takashi)
Distributor: GKIDS
Where to Find It: Select theaters

The franchise’s foray into the slick and seductive world of 3DCG animation (à la Pixar, et al.) has always been inevitable and that the results are both jarringly different and comfortably familiar in equal measure. Purists and non-Japanese audiences who prize anime for its enduringly “hand-drawn” appeal might be put off by the acrylic character designs and generic environments of Yamazaki Takashi’s “Lupin III: The First,” but it’s not as if this high-profile new addition to the Lupin saga is pissing on Katō’s grave; he dreamed of seeing a CG Lupin before he died, and hoped that rendering his signature character in a more universal style might draw new attention to Japan and its stories. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“On the Rocks” (directed by Sofia Coppola)
Distributor: A24 and AppleTV+
Where to Find It: Streaming on AppleTV+

Don’t be fooled by the dusky seduction of its wedding night prologue: “On the Rocks” is far and away the least cool thing that Sofia Coppola has ever made. That’s not a criticism so much as a contextualization. If the perfume ad prelude cocoons you inside the same gauzy softness that made “Lost in Translation” so entrancing, “Marie Antoinette” so tactile, and “Somewhere” so tenderly siloed within itself, it only does so in order to cut a sharp contrast into the domesticity that follows. That’s when this fizzy champagne cocktail of a film jumps a few years forward, landing in the kind of marriage where the waters have become just a bit too calm for the people swimming in them to feel safe. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Over the Moon” (directed by Glen Keane)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

If “Over the Moon” launches into orbit on the strength of its specificity, much of the film is frustratingly generic for a fable so rooted in a particular sense of place, the unique traditions that come with it, and the way they help a certain little girl learn to appreciate the enduring light of her late mother’s love. The result is a taste of Chinese folklore that’s almost Disneyfied beyond recognition — a movie that gets a bit lost in space between telling a story about one kid, and telling a story that could resonate with them all. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Radium Girls” (directed by Lydia Dean Pilcher and Ginny Mohler)
Distributor: Juno Films
Where to Find It: Select theaters and various virtual cinema options

The film, like so many others that have arrived during a strange year, feels weirdly timely, thanks to its depictions of civil unrest, cultural deception, corporate malfeasance, media manipulation, and one very compelling mention of the Tulsa race massacre — though that would be enough! — that are all the more impressive when you realize the film was actually made in 2018. Some things, it seems, never change, and even though “Radium Girls” struggles to deliver that message with as fine a point as it should, it’s worth remembering. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Rebecca” (directed by Ben Wheatley)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

Despite its title, this “Rebecca” is decidedly modeled after the second Mrs. de Winter instead of the first. Soapy where Hitchcock’s interpretation was stiff, the film is beautiful and hurried and eager to be liked by everyone in a way that will only lead to trouble. It dutifully respects Manderley’s past, while at the same time revitalizing that drafty mausoleum with an Instagram-ready sheen. Here’s an adaptation that strives to repaint Manderley without pissing off any of the spirits that continue to haunt its memory, and the perfume-scented romance of that new patina can be thick enough to make you see Daphne du Maurier’s story in a slightly different (if not altogether flattering) light. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Sounding” (directed by Catherine Eaton)
Distributor: Giant Pictures
Where to Find It: Various digital and VOD platforms

In the spring 2017, one-time “All My Children” star Catherine Eaton’s directorial debut, “The Sounding,” made its premiere at the Minneapolis St. Paul International Film Festival, where it picked up the Audience Award in the “New American Visions” section. Since then, Eaton — who also stars in the film, which she wrote with Bryan Delaney — has taken the film around the world, picking up jury awards, audience awards, and even a best cinematography win for DP David Kruta at the Woodstock Film Festival. The definition of an indie gem, Eaton’s film is finally being released more than 40 months after its Minnesota debut, offering a well-drawn character study wrapped inside an ambitious plot. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Synchronic” (directed by Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead)
Distributor: Well Go USA
Where to Find It: Select theaters

“Synchronic” may be a hot mess of a movie — one that mixes “Bringing Out the Dead,” “Slaughterhouse-Five,” and literal bath salts into a muddy swirl of mismatched ideas that don’t have much interest in blending together — but its best stretches have some hazy, ultra-literal fun illustrating why some people in this country might put more stock in the hope for tomorrow than the halcyon glow of yesterday. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“White Noise” (directed by Daniel Lombroso)
Distributor: The Atlantic
Where to Find It: Various digital and VOD platforms

Half a decade ago, the ascendance of the alt-right was about as plausible as the election of Donald Trump, and we all know how that worked out. Like the 2016 election, director Daniel Lombroso’s provocative alt-right portrait “White Noise” isn’t all that surprising, but that doesn’t lessen the terror within. In capturing the racist trifecta of alt-right pundits Mike Cernovich, Laura Southern, and Richard Spencer, the documentary shows how they became emboldened by celebrity stature, and comes so close to letting them run the show it risks trumpeting their cause. Fortunately, it doesn’t take the most discerning bullshit detector to realize that “White Noise” has been engineered to expose a fundamental danger to whatever moral fabric America has left. Lombroso has made the scariest documentary of the year without telling us anything new. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Witches” (directed by Robert Zemeckis)
Distributor: Warner Bros.
Where to Find It: Streaming on HBO Max

Zemeckis has made some unsuccessful films over the last 20 years, but “The Witches” is the most frustrating of them all because it feels like it could’ve been made by somebody else. Anybody else. Nicolas Roeg’s version may have scarred a generation of kids for life, but at least they remembered it. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“After We Collided” (directed by Roger Kumble)
Distributor: Open Road Films
Where to Find It: Select theaters

“The Empty Man” (directed by David Prior)
Distributor: 20th Century Studios
Where to Find It: Select theaters

“Friendsgiving” (directed by Nicol Paone)
Distributor: Saban Films, Lionsgate
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various digital and VOD platforms

“The Mothman Legacy” (directed by Seth Breedlove)
Distributor: 1091 Pictures
Where to Find It: Various digital platforms

“The Place of No Words” (directed by Mark Webber)
Distributor: Gravitas Ventures
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various digital and VOD platforms

“Tar” (directed by Aaron Wolf)
Distributor: 1091 Pictures
Where to Find It: Various digital and VOD platforms

Films Available via Virtual Cinema

Learn more about virtual cinemas offerings right here.

“Coming Home Again” (directed by Wayne Wang)
Distributor: Outsider Pictures
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Chiseled as a haiku, director Wayne Wang’s “Coming Home Again” opens a window onto dying days in all their ugliness, but also onto their possibility of redemption for a mother and son. Formally impeccable and observant, the “Joy Luck Club” filmmaker’s latest wastes none of its 85 minutes in unpeeling the relationship between Chang-rae (Justin Chon) and his ailing mom (Jackie Chung). At the heart of this Ozu-esque drama is Chung, who supplies a heartbreaking performance as a woman trying to make up for lost time, while also trying to explain to her son why time slipped from under her in the first place, leaving behind some potent maxims and Korean recipes in the process. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Ham on Rye” (directed by Tyler Taormina)
Distributor: Factory 25
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

A stylish twist on the end-of-high-school dramedy, Tyler Taormina’s “Ham on Rye” offers the ethereal echoes of “The Virgin Suicides” with the gossamer veil of a humid summer’s day slowly lifting, but laced with notes of John Hughes on a steady micro-dose of LSD. That’s to say things are always off-kilter in this movie but the exact nature of whatever is the kink in this coming-of-ager never reveals itself. And while the narrative hardly goes into the fully unhinged direction it teases, it’s pleasantly askew and always marching to its own strange and, slightly off, beat. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Midnight in Paris” (directed by James Blagden and Roni Moore)
Distributor: Metrograph Live Screenings
Where to Find It: Rent the film through Metrograph’s membership program

Week of October 12 – October 18

New Films on VOD and Streaming (And in Select Theaters)

As new movies open in theaters during the COVID-19 pandemic, IndieWire will continue to review them whenever possible. We encourage readers to follow the safety precautions provided by CDC and health authorities. Additionally, our coverage will provide alternative viewing options whenever they are available.

“Blackpink: Light Up the Sky” (directed by Caroline Suh)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

An intimate look at one of the most popular musical acts in the world, the kind that have so many accolades on their dedicated Wikipedia “awards and nominations page” that a copious amount of scrolling is required to reach the bottom. Little of it will surprise the group’s long-time fans (or, as popular parlance now deems them, “stans”) and it will likely spark interested newbies to seek out further information, but “Blackpink: Light Up the Sky” does a stellar job of introducing Jisoo, Jennie, Rosé, and Lisa as individuals. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Clouds” (directed by Justin Baldoni)
Distributor: Disney
Where to Find It: Streaming on Disney+

For a movie adapted from a memoir called “Fly a Little Higher: How God Answered a Mom’s Small Prayer in a Big Way,” Justin Baldoni’s “Clouds” is surprisingly light on the Jesus of it all. The inspirational story of Zach Sobiech and the hit song the 17-year-old musician wrote after being confronted with his terminal osteosarcoma diagnosis in 2012 (and taking a last-ditch family trip to Lourdes), this true-life tear-jerker seems poised to become the latest addition to the growing sub-genre of “behind the music” biopics about Christians who deal with cancer by recording chart-toppers about their love for God. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Evil Eye” (directed by Elan Dassani and Rajeev Dassani)
Distributor: Amazon and Blumhouse
Where to Find It: Streaming on Amazon Prime Video

The film’s greatest strength — that it tackles a culturally specific storyline with care and respect, never falling into cheap tropes — is also what keeps it from being genuinely scary. Usha (Sarita Choudhury) is a traditional Indian mother who believes in everything from reincarnation and birth charts to matchmaking and lifelong curses, the kind of stuff another story (and other creators) might treat as a simple way to deliver out-there scares. But Usha’s concerns are presented as rooted in very real occurrences from the start, removing any sense of doubt that could otherwise add true tension to the narrative. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Honest Thief” (directed by Mark Williams)
Distributor: Open Road Films
Where to Find It: Select theaters

Liam Neeson may have been a late-blooming action star, but if “Honest Thief” is the best he can muster now, those days are now behind him. As Tom, a notorious bank robber with a conscience, Neeson does his best with the material at hand, but he can only do so much when it reduces everything around him to a bland formulaic exercise. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Kate Nash: Underestimate the Girl” (directed by Amy Goldstein)
Distributor: BBC3
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus virtual cinema options

A desire to grow creatively led to her label dropping her, and Amy Goldstein’s film opens with Kate Nash fighting hard to come back on her own terms. It’s a tough story, but an old one, and audiences will have to wait for half the documentary to zip by — and it does! Nash is very easy to invest in, even in surface-level observations — before the other shoe drops and “Underestimate the Girl” goes somewhere much more raw and rewarding. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Kid Detective” (directed by Evan Morgan)
Distributor: Sony
Where to Find It: Select theaters

Director Evan Morgan, who also wrote the film’s screenplay, nattily sends up all the usual tropes of the eponymous kid detective, imagining Abe as the kind of junior gumshoe who paid said tween secretary in soda pop and mostly used his skills to just totally ruin movie plots with twists he could sniff out a mile away. But what does that look like nearly twenty years later? Adam Brody, who captured classic hangdog charm with his seminal turn in “The O.C.”
and somehow never let it go (a good thing) is a canny choice for adult Abe, the kind of grownup who forgets to brush his teeth, has no idea what day it is, and still needs his parents to deliver his groceries. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Martin Eden” (directed by Pietro Marcello)
Distributor: Kino Lorber
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus virtual cinema options

Unmoored from recognizable history, “Martin Eden” sloshes forward in such a way that we lose track of the title character long before he loses track of himself. An abrupt time jump at the start of the third act teleports Martin into high society, and that disorienting leap clearly articulates his struggle to reconcile who he was with who he is now. They’re ostensibly meant to be the same man — it’s society’s view of him that’s changed — but our view of him has changed as well. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Nocturne” (directed by Zu Quirke)
Distributor: Amazon and Blumhouse
Where to Find It: Streaming on Amazon Prime Video

If “Whiplash,” “Black Swan,” “The Piano Teacher,” and “Glee” have taught us anything, it’s that a life in music studies is hell. The cutthroat, competitive jockeying. The sleepless, foodless nights. The sexual frustration. All of the above take their weighty toll on the soul. This by-now culturally mythic concept is taken to supernatural dimensions in the latest Blumhouse entry for Amazon, “Nocturne.” While star Sydney Sweeney delivers on the promise of her turn on HBO’s “Euphoria” as a compelling presence capable of displaying vulnerability without ever seeming naive, a derivative screenplay that can’t stick the landing doesn’t so much fail her gifts as allow them to outshine it. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Shithouse” (directed by Cooper Raiff)
Distributor: IFC Films
Where to Find It: Select theaters, various VOD platforms

A super-promising debut from someone with a clear gift for personalizing shared experiences (and revitalizing the clichés that tend to make us think that we’re bored of ourselves), “Shithouse” knows that growing up can be a lonely process, but one that most people only feel like they have to go through on their own. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Totally Under Control” (directed by Alex Gibney)
Distributor: Neon
Where to Find It: Various VOD platforms

“Totally Under Control” is far from the first documentary to tackle coronavirus fallout (recent efforts “76 Days” and Ai Weiwei’s “Coronation” reveal the struggle inside Wuhan), but it’s the first serious assessment outside of nightly news shows to illustrate how much America bungled its response. Alex Gibney and his collaborators fold in a lot of material into two hours, from the tick-tock of CDC efforts to downplay the virus and Donald Trump’s lunacy in conflicting science at every turn, to the horrible miscalculations that led to a dearth of tests and PPE supplies. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Trial of the Chicago 7” (directed by Aaron Sorkin)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

Aaron Sorkin’s script is both economical and verbose, flitting between courtroom frustrations, anxious strategy sessions, and lively snippets of the Chicago events themselves. For every burst of zealous speech-mongering, there’s another endearing zinger from Hoffman — who has fun with the confusion over sharing a surname with the judge — or a taut montage revisiting the Chicago chaos in question. The movie moves too fast to linger on its rough patches. In lesser hands, the abrupt cameo by an irascible Michael Keaton as former Attorney General Ramsey Clark might register as little more than a flimsy gimmick; for Sorkin, it’s an enjoyable extension of the starry framework that he embraces from the outset. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Alone” (directed by Johnny Martin)
Distributor: Lionsgate
Where to Find It: Various VOD and digital platforms

“Bane: Holding These Moments” (directed by Dan Elswick)
Distributor: 1091 Pictures
Where to Find It: Various VOD and digital platforms

“The Dance” (directed by Rino Arreaza)
Distributor: 1091 Pictures
Where to Find It: Various VOD and digital platforms

“The Devil Has a Name” (directed by Edward James Olmos)
Distributor: Momentum Pictures
Where to Find It: Various VOD and digital platforms

“Don’t Look Back” (directed by Jeffrey Reddick)
Distributor: Gravitas Ventures
Where to Find It: Various VOD and digital platforms

“Harry Chapin: When in Doubt, Do Something” (directed by Rick Korn)
Distributor: Greenwich Entertainment
Where to Find It: Select theaters, various virtual cinema options

“Love and Monsters” (directed by Michael Matthews)
Distributor: Paramount Pictures
Where to Find It: Various PVOD platforms

“The Opening Act” (directed by Steve Byrne)
Distributor: RLJE Films
Where to Find It: Various VOD and digital platforms

“She Is the Ocean” (directed by Inna Blokhina)
Distributor: Blue Fox Entertainment
Where to Find It: Select theaters, various virtual cinema options

“What the Constitution Means to Me” (directed by Marielle Heller)
Distributor: Amazon
Where to Find It: Streaming on Amazon Prime Video

“When the Storm Fades” (directed by Sean Devlin)
Distributor: 1091 Pictures
Where to Find It: Various VOD and digital platforms

Films Available via Virtual Cinema

Learn more about virtual cinemas offerings right here.

Also available this week:

“White Riot” (directed by Rubika Shah)
Distributor: Film Movement
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Week of October 5 – October 11

New Films on VOD and Streaming (And in Select Theaters)

As new movies open in theaters during the COVID-19 pandemic, IndieWire will continue to review them whenever possible. We encourage readers to follow the safety precautions provided by CDC and health authorities. Additionally, our coverage will provide alternative viewing options whenever they are available.

“The 40-Year-Old Version” (directed by Radha Blank)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

Shot throughout New York with gorgeous black-and-white photography (by “Clemency” cinematographer Eric Branco), “The 40-Year-Old Version” always feels close to the ground, with Radha Blank’s uneven path to writing a new play — and finding unexpected catharsis in hip hop — taking a series of entertaining twists. At 129 minutes, the lighthearted format risks growing stale, and certainly could have shaved off some perfunctory scenes. But Blank is so adroit at populating her story with shrewd observations and her own infectious personality that even its loose structure vibes with the nature of the movie, which maintains the rascally energy of an early Spike Lee joint while channeling a fresh new voice. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Black Box” (directed by Emmanuel Osei-Kuffour)
Distributor: Amazon, Blumhouse
Where to Find It: Streaming on Amazon Prime Video

About an hour into “Black Box,” there’s a twist so good it almost salvages the cheesy B-movie that led up to it. This Blumhouse-produced debut from director Emmanuel Osei-Kuffour blends the psychological uneasiness of an amnesiac’s plight with the ravings of a mad scientist, and the full premise suggests a clever marriage of “Total Recall” and “Get Out.” It lacks the inspired lunacy of the former and the fiery social commentary of the latter, but Osei-Kuffour (who co-wrote the movie with Wade Allain-Marcus and Stephen Herman) has constructed an enigmatic lo-fi thriller with just enough intricate mind games to make the eerie journey worthwhile. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Hubie Halloween” (directed by Steven Brill)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

Sure, “Hubie Halloween” feels like it was written in the span of a single afternoon by two middle-aged men wearing gym shorts, but at least they included a scene where Ray Liotta refers to star Adam Sandler’s dim-witted hero as “Pubie Dubois” (a cruel nickname that spreads through Salem like a novel coronavirus through the White House). Sure, this dopey story about a Halloween-obsessed scaredy cat who teaches the jerks in his town about the true meaning of bravery or whatever is just a flimsy excuse to let Sandler and his friends make each other laugh on someone else’s dime/bottomless corporate debt, but at least it allows every American to fulfill their lifelong dream of watching Steve Buscemi play a werewolf. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Lie” (directed by Veena Sud)
Distributor: Amazon, Blumhouse
Where to Find It: Streaming on Amazon Prime Video

Two years after an unimpressive showing at TIFF, “The Lie” finally gets a release, rolling out as part of a planned eight-film package of horror films (a genre distinction, it seems, that is to be taken loosely) sent straight to Amazon Prime Video streaming by Blumhouse Productions. Too stupid to be the hard-hitting drama it was first sold as and too self-important to be the black comedy it really should be, Sud’s film is a master class in bad decision-making, improbable choices, and overwrought acting. It is also incredibly difficult to turn away from, each plot point more ludicrous than the next, all leading up to an ending that should rank among the all-time great fake-outs, should anyone choose to remember the film beyond its zippy 97-minute running time. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Time” (directed by Garrett Bradley)
Distributor: Amazon Studios
Where to Find It: Select theaters (starts streaming on October 23)

Swirled together from 18 years’ worth of MiniDV tapes (in addition to the newer, more pristine footage the filmmaker shot of Fox Rich and her family before that incredible treasure trove of home video was dumped in her lap), Garrett Bradley’s monumental and enormously moving “Time” doesn’t juxtapose the pain of yesterday against the hope of tomorrow so much as it insists upon a perpetual now. And while the documentary never reduces its subjects to mere symbols of the oppression they represent — the film couldn’t be more personal, and it builds to a moment of such unvarnished intimacy that you can hardly believe what you’re watching — Bradley’s Tralfamadorian editing flattens time in a way that contextualizes mass incarceration on the largest of continuums. “Time” in name and timeless in style, this liquid history streams centuries of subjugation into a single confluence of dehumanization until black slavery and the prison-industrial complex become two separate brooks that feed into the same river. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The War with Grandpa” (directed by Tim Hill)
Distributor: 101 Studios
Where to Find It: Select theaters

If you were to assume that a movie starring Robert De Niro, Uma Thurman, Christopher Walken, Cheech Marin, and Jane Seymour sounded like the next Quentin Tarantino epic, you would not be entirely remiss. But you would be sorely disappointed to discover, upon purchasing entry to “The War with Grandpa,” that the killer cast is sorely wasted on an utterly inane script about a spoiled kid who inexplicably decides he hates his very nice grandpa for moving into his room. Based on the popular kids’ book by Robert Kimmel Smith, “The War with Grandpa” is a sluggish hodgepodge of slapstick humor that barely holds together its illogically motivated plot. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Yellow Rose” (directed by Diane Paragas)
Distributor: Sony
Where to Find It: Select theaters

Diane Paragas’ “Yellow Rose” subtly weaves together the truth of Rose’s (Broadway star and Tony nominee Eva Noblezada) story in affecting, though never sentimental or maudlin, ways. Rose and Priscilla keep close because they’re undocumented immigrants, eager to keep their heads down and work hard and basically hope that ICE doesn’t come banging on their door in the middle of the night. Paragas’ film finds fresh ground to explore the price and the power of the American dream, bolstered by country crooning and heartbreaking (and very real) legal worries. It’s a concept that might sound played out, but deft directing and a number of strong performances recommend it, a down-home answer to the similarly charming 2018 drama “Wild Rose.” Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Cagefighter” (directed by Jesse Quinones)
Distributor: Screen Media
Where to Find It: Select theaters, various digital and VOD platforms

“The Doorman” (directed by Ryûhei Kitamura)
Distributor: Lionsgate
Where to Find It: Various digital and VOD platforms

“Naughty Books” (directed by Austen Eleanore Rachlis)
Distributor: 1091 Pictures
Where to Find It: Various digital platforms

“The Planters” (directed by Alexandra Kotcheff and Hannah Leder)
Distributor: 1091 Pictures
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

“Treason” (directed by Eric DePriester)
Distributor: 1091 Pictures
Where to Find It: Various digital and VOD platforms

“The Wolf of Snow Hollow” (directed by Jim Cummings)
Distributor: Orion Classics
Where to Find It: Select theaters, various digital and VOD platforms

Films Available via Virtual Cinema

Learn more about virtual cinemas offerings right here.

Also available this week:

“Major Arcana” (directed by Josh Melrod)
Distributor: Kino Marquee
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

“Mighty Ira” (directed by Nico Perrino, Aaron Reese, Chris Maltby)
Distributor: Required Viewing
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Week of September 28 – October 4

New Films on VOD and Streaming (And in Select Theaters)

As new movies open in theaters during the COVID-19 pandemic, IndieWire will continue to review them whenever possible. We encourage readers to follow the safety precautions provided by CDC and health authorities. Additionally, our coverage will provide alternative viewing options whenever they are available.

“12 Hour Shift” (directed by Brea Grant)
Distributor: Magnet Releasing
Where to Find It: Select drive-ins, various VOD platforms

Empowered by her collaborators and bolstered by her vision, Grant sutures together a blood-stained romp where anything can happen next, and even the most unexpected sequences feel like they make sense in this world. “12 Hour Shift” doesn’t juggle a variety of different tones so much as it forges a bonkers one of its own and sticks to it all the way through, so that even when the plot runs itself ragged towards the end, the movie has more than enough energy to push itself over the finish line and keep striving for new highs until it gets there. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“American Murder: The Family Next Door” (directed by Jenny Popplewell)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

An impeccably produced look at a heinous crime, Popplewell’s documentary meticulously weaves together a wealth of information — including body-camera footage from the first cop on the scene, claustrophobic interrogation room setups, and the social-media messages so many armchair sleuths pored over to discredit Shan’ann Watts — that it almost feels too readymade for the film treatment. Almost. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Boys in the Band” (directed by Joe Mantello)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

The result is a sophisticated, tart-tongued revival, and a gayed-up “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” that surmounts the challenges faced by stage-to-screen adaptations, specifically the utter confinement to a single space. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“A Call to Spy” (directed by Lydia Dean Pilcher)
Distributor: IFC Films
Where to Find It: Select theaters, various VOD platforms

True stories about brave, everyday people fighting evil powers never go out of fashion, and “A Call to Spy” joins their ranks with ease. It’s a traditional film, and while it premiered on the festival circuit last year, it can’t help but feel necessary and timely in its theatrical release. Sarah Megan Thomas’ meticulous work alone recommends it, but like the story it follows, it’s the result of many talented women working together for the common good. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“David Attenborough: A Life on Our Planet” (directed by Keith Scholey, Alastair Fothergill, Jonathan Hughes)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

Attenborough is onscreen throughout much of this urgent film, which might surprise viewers who know him as the disembodied narrator of the epic nature series he’s made with the BBC in the Blu-ray era. Beyond that, it’s striking how Attenborough isn’t just playing his typical role as the erudite commentator with a contagious enthusiasm for life on Earth in all its forms. The man is still too humble to let himself become the subject at hand, but now — toward the end of his own natural life — Attenborough is showing us the world as he sees it. For all of the incredible things he’s captured with his camera, “A Life on Our Planet” is perhaps the first time Attenborough is acting as its lens. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Dick Johnson Is Dead” (directed by Kirsten Johnson)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

The title of “Dick Johnson Is Dead” doesn’t lie, but it’s not exactly truthful, either. Dick Johnson dies many times in his daughter Kirsten’s poignant and personal documentary, starting with the opening credits. And yet he’s very much alive the whole time, playacting in an elaborate form of cinematic therapy with his filmmaker offspring as she wrestles with the anxiety of losing him. That concept could easily devolve into a navel-gazing exercise, but Kirsten Johnson — the veteran nonfiction cinematographer who directed 2016’s wondrous collage film “Cameraperson” — enacts a touching and funny meditation on embracing life and fearing death at the same time. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Glorias” (directed by Julie Taymor)
Distributor: Amazon
Where to Find It: Streaming on Amazon Prime Video

Filmmaker Julie Taymor has never operated within conventional parameters, but then again, neither has her latest cinematic subject, feminist icon and political firebrand Gloria Steinem. Taymor, who has only dipped into biopics once before, with the similarly creative “Frida,” knows that life doesn’t move in a straight line, which could have scared her off from adapting Steinem’s road-trip autobiography. But the road to becoming “Gloria Steinem” was winding, and the best parts of the wonderfully inventive “The Glorias” are when Taymor takes her various eponymous Glorias on some artful detours. Steinem, fortunately, has many of them to offer. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“On the Rocks” (directed by Sofia Coppola)
Distributor: A24 and AppleTV+
Where to Find It: Select theaters (streaming on AppleTV+ on October 23)

Don’t be fooled by the dusky seduction of its wedding night prologue: “On the Rocks” is far and away the least cool thing that Sofia Coppola has ever made. That’s not a criticism so much as a contextualization. If the perfume ad prelude cocoons you inside the same gauzy softness that made “Lost in Translation” so entrancing, “Marie Antoinette” so tactile, and “Somewhere” so tenderly siloed within itself, it only does so in order to cut a sharp contrast into the domesticity that follows. That’s when this fizzy champagne cocktail of a film jumps a few years forward, landing in the kind of marriage where the waters have become just a bit too calm for the people swimming in them to feel safe. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Possessor” (directed by Brandon Cronenberg)
Distributor: Neon
Where to Find It: Select theaters

A queasy and intriguing horror-inflected techno-thriller that gets lost somewhere in the Bermuda Triangle between “Mandy,” “Inception,” and “Ghost in the Shell,” Brandon Cronenberg’s “Possessor” is so drunk on its own sick potential that it doesn’t have the time (or the balance) required to realize most of it. On the other hand, 90 minutes of Andrea Riseborough and Christopher Abbott engaging in ultra-gory psychic warfare over control of the latter’s body is more satisfying than what most of the current Best Picture nominees have to offer, so maybe it’s wise not to look a gift horse in the mouth. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Save Yourselves” (directed by Alex Huston Fischer and Eleanor Wilson)
Distributor: Bleecker Street
Where to Find It: Select theaters (various VOD platforms to follow next week)

Alex Huston Fischer and Eleanor Wilson’s amiable “Save Yourselves!” knowingly digs deep into the long-time couple’s obvious ennui — cradling their iPhones like babies, they’re prone to announcing they want to be “better people,” which maybe involves, like, I dunno, going vegetarian again? — and pulls out a winking contemporary comedy with a generous dash of cutesy sci-fi weirdness. And while it doesn’t quite stick the landing, the zippy journey there is fun enough to justify the winding road there. (Bonus: incredibly cute, very murderous alien beings). Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Scare Me” (directed by Josh Ruben)
Distributor: Shudder
Where to Find It: Streaming on Shudder

The result is a winking horror comedy with a lot on its mind — perhaps too much. Its padded running time is nearly 105 minutes, when it seems like the perfect pick for a snappy, scary 90-minute event. Initially imagining writer’s block and creative stultification as man’s greatest horrors (see: “The Shining”) before moving into a deeper exploration of the trauma of gender relations (no, really: “The Shining”), “Scare Me” packs ambitious ideas inside a small-scale concept. Bolstered by a creative storytelling set-up, Ruben and his very game co-star Aya Cash skewer horror tropes as well as cultural obsessions ranging from TV talent shows to the Bechdel Test. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“2067” (directed by Seth Larney)
Distributor: RLJE Films
Where to Find It: Various digital and VOD platforms

“Death of Me” (directed by Darren Lynn Bousman)
Distributor: Saban Films
Where to Find It: Various digital and VOD platforms

“Do Not Reply” (directed by Daniel Woltosz and Walt Woltosz)
Distributor: Gravitas Ventures
Where to Find It: Select theaters, various VOD platforms

“The Great American Lie” (directed by Jennifer Siebel Newsom)
Distributor: Vertical Entertainment
Where to Find It: Various digital and VOD platforms

“Herb Alpert Is…” (directed by John Scheinfeld)
Distributor: Abramorama
Where to Find It: Various digital and VOD platforms

“Inez & Doug & Kira” (directed by Julia Kots)
Distributor: 1091 Media
Where to Find It: Various VOD platforms

“Spontaneous” (directed by Brian Duffield)
Distributor: Paramount Pictures
Where to Find It: Select drive-in theaters, various VOD platforms

“Then Came You” (directed by Adriana Trigiani)
Distributor: Vertical Entertainment
Where to Find It: Various digital and VOD platforms

Films Available via Virtual Cinema

Learn more about virtual cinemas offerings right here.

Also available this week:

“The Antenna” (directed by Orçun Behram)
Distributor: Dark Star Pictures
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

“Once Upon a River” (directed by Haroula Rose)
Distributor: Film Movement
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Week of September 21 – September 27

New Films on VOD and Streaming (And in Select Theaters)

As new movies open in theaters during the COVID-19 pandemic, IndieWire will continue to review them whenever possible. We encourage readers to follow the safety precautions provided by CDC and health authorities. Additionally, our coverage will provide alternative viewing options whenever they are available.

“Enola Holmes” (directed by Harry Bradbeer)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

While some of the hijinks go somewhat slack in the film’s middle — 123 minutes is a lot of time to fill, even with so many twists and turns — “Enola Holmes” and its winning heroine (Millie Bobby Brown) drive straight into an appropriately shocking conclusion that neatly sets up further adventures. Along the way, it establishes Enola and her evolving world as one both entertaining and instructive, a glimpse at a people and place on the cusp of something better and bigger, and willing to follow every clue to get there. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Kajillionaire” (directed by Miranda July)
Distributor: Focus Features
Where to Find It: Select theaters

Stories about con artist families speak to desperate times, and we’re apparently living through them, because each of the last three years have brought new cinematic entries to the genre. First came Hirokazu Kore-eda’s delicate “Shoplifters,” followed by Bong Joon Ho’s zany “Parasite,” both of which centered on offspring wondering if their family values might be off-kilter. Now comes Miranda July’s “Kajillionaire,” a minor-key sketch of a movie with soulful undercurrents that sneak into a cynical plot as its principle character wises up. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Kiss the Ground” (directed by Joshua Tickell and Rebecca Harrell Tickell)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

There’s a good message at the heart of Joshua Tickell and Rebecca Harrell Tickell’s climate crisis documentary, “Kiss the Ground,” though much of it gets obscured by repetitive filmmaking techniques and a cadre of eco-conscious celebrity cameos that add paper-thin razzle dazzle to the proceedings. The documentary does offer a “simple solution” to the climate crisis, with a comprehensive, common-sense plan that centers on reinvigorating our depleted soil. But the Tickells’ apparent belief that fact-based information is more thrilling when it’s delivered by stars that offer no bonafides beyond “hey, I like vegetables too” threatens to keep the film from ever hitting hard enough to truly inspire its viewers. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Last Shift” (directed by Andrew Cohn)
Distributor: Sony
Where to Find It: Select theaters

A more self-insistent style might have distracted from the mission at hand, but “The Last Shift” doesn’t always recognize where it stands on the border between “unfussy” and “uninteresting.” And yet, in such a knowing film about how thoroughly Americans are trained to undervalue themselves and each other, it’s hard to fault “The Last Shift” for doing the bare minimum. After all, it’s only once Jevon learns what his bare minimum looks like that he’s able to raise the bar. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Misbehaviour” (directed by Philippa Lowthorpe)
Distributor: Shout! Studios
Where to Find It: Select theaters, various VOD platforms

Not everyone in Philippa Lowthorpe’s “Misbehaviour” has signed up for the revolution. Wide-ranging to a fault, the filmmaker’s multi-faceted look at the 1970 Miss World beauty pageant weaves its tale from the perspectives of a litany of players involved with what turned into a culture-shifting protest. It’s not just the women’s libbers on offer here or an assortment of conflicted competitors, it’s also the pageant brass, various members of the press corps covering the event — hell, even special guest Bob Hope (a disarmingly icky Greg Kinnear, and that’s very much a compliment) gets his own arc. While Rebecca Frayn and Gaby Chiappe’s script works hard to give all of its players dimension, such an overstuffed narrative tends to do the opposite, limping through sub-subplots and continually introducing new characters, leaving its main attractions to twist in the wind. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Ottolenghi and the Cakes of Versailles” (directed by Laura Gabbert)
Distributor: IFC Films
Where to Find It: Select theaters, various VOD platforms

Directed by “City of Gold” filmmaker Laura Gabbert, “Ottolenghi and the Cakes of Versailles” offers a mouthwatering — if half-baked — look behind the scenes at how the event came together. Sweeter than it is satisfying, this 75-minute documentary eschews any real sense of conflict in favor of positioning itself as a ruminative slice of edutainment; it grabs you by the tongue from its opening shots and leads you the rest of the way by serving up a sugar-coated sampling of food for thought. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Secret Society of Second-Born Royals” (directed by Anna Mastro)
Distributor: Disney
Where to Find It: Streaming on Disney+

Many of the movies that have premiered on Disney+ in the last few months (“Mulan,” “Artemis Fowl,” etc.) are would-be blockbusters that were made with theaters in mind and only went digital because of the pandemic. “Secret Society of Second-Born Royals” is obviously, glaringly, and insistently not one of those movies. Produced by the Disney Channel and seemingly budgeted at the same cost as an episode of “The Suite Life of Zack & Cody,” this cut-rate superhero origin story tries to do for kids what “Sky High,” “The Princess Diaries,” and “Agent Cody Banks” have already done for kids, but cheaper and at the same time. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“The Artist’s Wife” (directed by Tom Dolby)
Distributor: Strand Releasing
Where to Find It: Select theaters, various VOD platforms

“Ava” (directed by Tate Taylor)
Distributor: Vertical Entertainment
Where to Find It: Select theaters, various digital and VOD platforms

Films Available via Virtual Cinema

Learn more about virtual cinemas offerings right here.

“Dead” (directed by Hayden J. Weal)
Distributor: 1091 Pictures
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

“We Are Many” (directed by Amir Amirani)
Distributor: Area 23a Films and Iambic Dream Films
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Week of September 14 – September 20

New Films on VOD and Streaming (And in Select Theaters)

As new movies open in theaters during the COVID-19 pandemic, IndieWire will continue to review them whenever possible. We encourage readers to follow the safety precautions provided by CDC and health authorities. Additionally, our coverage will provide alternative viewing options whenever they are available.

“All In: The Fight for Democracy” (directed by Liz Garbus and Lisa Cortes)
Distributor: Amazon Studios
Where to Find It: Select theaters, streaming on Amazon Prime Video

At times, “All In: The Fight for Democracy” plays like a survey for an introductory class in voting rights — a noble aim, albeit one that doesn’t necessarily make for inspired filmmaking. The film’s most moving points are its flashes of humanity, which reveal the personal toll that racism and racist voting policies take. Abrams’ own narrative is especially illuminating; as a skilled rhetorical politician she is an expert at weaving her story into broader themes. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Antebellum” (directed by Gerard Bush and Christopher Renz)
Distributor: Lionsgate
Where to Find It: Various VOD platforms

Even the most satisfying payoffs feels like missed opportunities, if only because we don’t get to see them along with an audience roaring in approval. That’s not fair, but what has been this year? Initially slated to be released this past April before it was delayed until the end of the most contentious summer in recent American history, “Antebellum” might have been a movie that met this awful moment, but its confused attempt at seeing yesterday in today resolves as a throwback to a time when anyone could actually overlook it in good faith. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Blackbird” (directed by Roger Michell)
Distributor: Screen Media
Where to Find It: Select theaters, various VOD platforms

The decision has already been made by the time Roger Michell’s “Blackbird” begins. Months of debates and discussion are long over, and now it’s time for the hard-headed Lily (Susan Sarandon) to die. It’s hard to imagine anything screaming “tough watch!” as much as “remake of a Danish euthanasia drama” — but Michell, screenwriter Christian Torpe (adapting his own original screenplay), and a talented cast strike a delicate balance in a domestic drama that ably combines heartbreak and humor. Twists abound, but emotions and events are never allowed to careen out of control, and Michell’s nimble direction keeps the ship right even through the stormiest of sequences. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Devil All the Time” (directed by Antonio Campos)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

There is no reason to care about anyone in Antonio Campos’ “The Devil All the Time,” a sweaty, bloated mess of a movie that flushes a knockout ensemble down the drain. More a pileup of scenes and tragedies strung together than the Altmanesque kaleidoscope of intersecting lives it could have been, this slog of an adaptation from Donald Ray Pollock’s terrific Appalachian gothic is dead from the start, with stars like Tom Holland and Robert Pattinson eagerly doing their best to resuscitate the corpse for a nearly two-and-a-half-hour running time. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Nest” (directed by Sean Durkin)
Distributor: IFC Films
Where to Find It: Select theaters

Writer-director Sean Durkin’s mesmerizing debut “Martha Marcy May Marlene” may put unreasonable expectations on his long-awaited sophomore effort, “The Nest,” because the masterful psychological thriller that put Durkin on the map has a lot more going for it than the sleek, contained period piece that has followed it up. However, “Martha” casts an unmistakable shadow on “The Nest,” which displays the same complex formalism of its predecessor while settling into a more conventional mold. In Durkin’s icy, slow-burn drama, every frame benefits from masterful composition. Carrie Coon and Jude Law deliver sizzling performances defined by mutual indignation, but it ultimately amounts to little more than talent spinning its wheels on both sides of the camera. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Secrets We Keep” (directed by Yuval Adler)
Distributor: Bleecker Street
Where to Find It: Select theaters

A listless, half-baked, vaguely Hitchcockian thriller about a Romani Holocaust survivor (a flushed Noomi Rapace) who’s trying to make a new life for herself in a Mayberry-like American suburb during the 1950s, Yuval Adler’s “The Secrets We Keep” hinges on a single question that it struggles to ask with the weight it demands and/or answer with the grindhouse-like glee it encourages: Is the friendly-seeming family man whose accented voice she recognizes in town one afternoon (Joel Kinnaman) actually one of the Nazi goons who executed her sister towards the end of the war? Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Way I See It” (directed by Dawn Porter)
Distributor: Focus Features
Where to Find It: Select theaters

There’s a cruel irony to the way Dawn Porter’s “The Way I See It” unfolds: this documentary about presidential photographer Pete Souza, who served as the official shutterbug for both the Reagan and Obama administrations, never quite knows where to focus. The problem is not that Porter, who this year has already given us “John Lewis: Good Trouble,” is unclear on the power of the images she’s following, but that the filmmaker seems distracted by the sheer amount of visual splendor she’s got at her disposal. Souza’s work has already filled seven books, innumerable newspaper pages, and one very popular Instagram account, a single film doesn’t seem fit to do it justice. That Souza’s legacy is so caught up in that of Obama’s doesn’t help matters either, and if both Souza and Porter are prone to turning “The Way I See It” into a doc about the former president, well, it’s understandable. It’s not entirely forgivable, though. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Alive” (directed by Rob Grant)
Distributor: Cranked Up Films
Where to Find It: Select theaters, various VOD platforms

“Alone” (directed by John Hyams)
Distributor: Magnet Releasing
Where to Find It: Select theaters, various VOD platforms

“H Is for Happiness” (directed by John Sheedy)
Distributor: Universal Pictures
Where to Find It:
Various VOD and digital platforms

“Lost Girls & Love Hotels” (directed by William Olsson)
Distributor: Astrakan Releasing
Where to Find It: Various VOD and digital platforms

“Murder in the Woods” (directed by Luis Iga Garza)
Distributor: Rezinate Pictures
Where to Find It: Various VOD and digital platforms

“No Escape” (directed by Will Wernick)
Distributor: Vertical Entertainment
Where to Find It: Various VOD and digital platforms

“The Racer” (directed by Kieron J. Walsh)
Distributor: Gravitas Ventures and Blinder Films
Where to Find It: Select theaters, various VOD platforms

“Wheels” (directed by Paul Starkman)
Distributor: 1091 Pictures
Where to Find It: Various VOD and streaming platforms

Films Available via Virtual Cinema

Learn more about virtual cinemas offerings right here.

Also available this week:

“My Name Is Pedro” (directed by Lillian LaSalle)
Distributor: Sweet 180 Productions
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Week of September 7 – September 13

New Films on VOD and Streaming (And in Select Theaters)

As new movies open in theaters during the COVID-19 pandemic, IndieWire will continue to review them whenever possible. We encourage readers to follow the safety precautions provided by CDC and health authorities. Additionally, our coverage will provide alternative viewing options whenever they are available.

“All In: The Fight for Democracy” (directed by Liz Garbus and Lisa Cortes)
Distributor: Amazon Studios
Where to Find It: Select theaters (streaming on Amazon Prime Video next week)

At times, “All In: The Fight for Democracy” plays like a survey for an introductory class in voting rights — a noble aim, albeit one that doesn’t necessarily make for inspired filmmaking. The film’s most moving points are its flashes of humanity, which reveal the personal toll that racism and racist voting policies take. Abrams’ own narrative is especially illuminating; as a skilled rhetorical politician she is an expert at weaving her story into broader themes. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Broken Hearts Gallery” (directed by Natalie Krinsky)
Distributor: Sony Pictures
Where to Find It: Select theaters

What this sweet, fleet-footed little trifle does capture is how to start a whole new you after you and me is no more. This certainly makes for an overly idealistic experience, but “Broken Hearts Gallery” is a far-cry from the algorithm-driven uncanny valleys of romantic human behavior as seen on Netflix’s versions of the same kind of film, and it features a totally delightful turn from Geraldine Viswanathan as the central brokenhearted who hatches an enviably creative way to move on. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Jimmy Carter Rock & Roll President” (directed by Mary Wharton)
Distributor: Greenwich Entertainment
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus virtual cinema options

The movie provides a breezy contrast to the dumbing-down of American leadership in the Trump era, and makes a canny argument for cultural exchange as a far better bargaining chip than anything found in “The Art of the Deal”: After all, Carter played country music for Den Xiaping while softening America’s relationship with China, which seems like a much better approach to diplomacy than anything on the 45th president’s Twitter feed. “The world may not trust America,” one interviewee says, “but it trusts Jimmy Carter and his taste in music.” If that had been enough to stabilize the nation, history books might remember him in kinder terms. Until then, “Jimmy Carter Rock & Roll President” is a welcome attempt to correct the record. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“I Am Woman” (directed by Unjoo Moon)
Distributor: Quiver Distribution
Where to Find It: Select theaters, various VOD and streaming platforms

The current spat of music biopics could use more direction like Unjoo Moon’s, which understands how much can be telegraphed through the sheer grace of a good performance within an even better performance. And the genre could use more stars like Tilda Cobham-Hervey, compelled to not only find the woman within the star, but to give both of them to power to be strong, invincible, and to roar. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Social Dilemma” (directed by Jeff Orlowski)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

Perhaps the single most lucid, succinct, and profoundly terrifying analysis of social media ever created for mass consumption, Jeff Orlowski’s “The Social Dilemma” does for Facebook what his previous documentaries “Chasing Ice” and “Chasing Coral” did for climate change (read: bring compelling new insight to a familiar topic while also scaring the absolute shit out of you). And while the film covers — and somehow manages to contain — a staggering breadth of topics and ramifications, one little sentence is all it takes to lay out the means and ends of the crisis at hand: Russia didn’t hack Facebook, Russia used Facebook. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Unpregnant” (directed by Rachel Lee Goldenberg)
Distributor: HBO Max
Where to Find It: Streaming on HBO Max

While Eliza Hittman’s “Never Rarely Sometimes Always” seems destined to remain the standout in this fledgling — and, yes, necessary and deeply informative — subgenre, Rachel Lee Goldenberg’s film happily illuminates how many other ways this story can be told. Bolstered by winning, real performances from its leads, “Unpregnant” will delight as much as it stings, a sterling reminder of how many stories about this very subject are still demanding to be told. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“I Met a Girl” (directed by Luke Eve)
Distributor: Gravitas Ventures
Where to Find It: Various VOD and streaming platforms

“Indigo Valley” (directed by Jaclyn Bethany)
Distributor: Giant Pictures
Where to Find It: Various VOD and streaming platforms

“Nail in the Coffin: The Fall & Rise of Vampiro” (directed by Michael Paszt)
Distributor: Epic Pictures
Where to Find It: Various VOD and streaming platforms

“Rent-a-Pal” (directed by Jon Stevenson)
Distributor: IFC Midnight
Where to Find It: Various VOD and streaming platforms

Films Available via Virtual Cinema

Learn more about virtual cinemas offerings right here.

“Sibyl” (directed by Justine Triet)
Distributor: Music Box Films
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Ultimately, “Sibyl” becomes a brighter, sillier, film-within-a-film spoof of the Woody Allen variety, and sends Sibyl careening further into a black hole of drunken resentment and self-destruction that underserves her character. Still, the movie remains a spirited look at how tension can run high on troubled sets, and gives the ever-talented Hüller the opportunity to elevate the material with her portrayal of the ultimate reckless auteur. There’s much to appreciate about the meta-commentary at the center of this lively work, but “Sibyl” ultimately becomes a victim of the same pressure to deliver a big, showy narrative that its troubled protagonist so desperately wishes she could tell. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Week of September 1 – September 6

New Films on VOD and Streaming (And in Select Theaters)

As new movies open in theaters during the COVID-19 pandemic, IndieWire will continue to review them whenever possible. We encourage readers to follow the safety precautions provided by CDC and health authorities. Additionally, our coverage will provide alternative viewing options whenever they are available.

“Feels Good Man” (directed by Arthur Jones)
Distributor: Giant Pictures
Where to Find It: Various VOD and streaming platforms

On its surface, Arthur Jones’ “Feels Good Man” is the sympathetic portrait of a man who created a monster, and then (eventually) took it upon himself to reclaim Pepe the Frog as an emblem of peace and love and peeing with your pants around your ankles. But underneath the lucid digital etymology that Jones energetically glues together from a zillion bits of internet detritus — and the warm snippets of original animation that he uses to show Pepe and his animal friends in a gentler light — is a documentary so much bigger than Matt Furie that it threatens to swallow him whole. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“I’m Thinking of Ending Things” (directed by Charlie Kaufman)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

“You can’t fake a thought.” Those words appear twice in the opening paragraphs of Iain Reid’s 2016 novel “I’m Thinking of Ending Things.” You don’t even have to turn the first page before it’s clear why Charlie Kaufman was so drawn to the book, as the filmmaker’s career has always been shaped by a fascination with the tortured — if tragicomic — relationship between the life of the mind and the world that’s filtered through it. Kaufman is obsessed with the cracked echo chamber of human consciousness; with the feeling that everyone is talking to each other through a two-way mirror; with the perverse irony that our inescapable ego-centrism is the one thing we all have in common. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Mulan” (directed by Niki Caro)
Distributor: Disney
Where to Find It: Streaming on Disney+ for an additional fee

Disney’s beloved Princess tales are no stranger to classic mythology, and everything from “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” to “The Princess and the Frog” have pulled liberally from existing material to craft family-friendly animated outings centered on inspirational women. Such was the case with the Mouse House’s 1998 animated hit “Mulan,” which used a centuries-old piece of Chinese folklore to craft the story of the first Asian Disney Princess, complete with requisite musical numbers and even a cute (if later maligned) talking animal pal. “The Ballad of Mulan” has inspired countless adaptations over the years, and while Niki Caro’s live-action update, starring the engaging Yifei Liu, still retains some trappings of its Disney-fication, it’s also a remarkable action epic that carves its own path. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Tenet” (directed by Christopher Nolan)
Distributor: Warner Bros.
Where to Find It: Select theaters

Entering 2020, Christopher Nolan’s “Tenet” was the summer’s most keenly awaited event movie. Eight apocalyptic months on, it’s assumed the mantle of messianic cinema: a project aiming to blow minds, make a bundle, and thereby save the theatrical experience for all mankind. And what kind of picture is it? Big, certainly: IMAX-scaled, and a hefty 150 minutes even after a visibly ruthless edit. It’s clever, too — yes, the palindromic title has some narrative correlation — albeit in an exhausting, rather joyless way. As second comings go, “Tenet” is like witnessing a Sermon on the Mount preached by a savior who speaks exclusively in dour, drawn-out riddles. Any awe is flattened by follow-up questions. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“The 2nd” (directed by Brian Skiba)
Distributor: Momentum Pictures
Where to Find It: Various VOD and streaming platforms

“The Argument” (directed by Robert Schwartzman)
Distributor: Gravitas Ventures
Where to Find It: Various VOD platforms, plus select theaters

“Critical Thinking” (directed by John Leguizamo)
Distributor: Vertical Entertainment
Where to Find It: Various VOD and digital platforms, plus virtual cinema options

“Freaks: You’re One of Us” (directed by Felix Binder)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

“Guest House” (directed by Sam Macaroni)
Distributor: Various VOD and digital platforms
Where to Find It: Lionsgate and Grindstone Entertainment Group

“Love, Guaranteed” (directed by Mark Steven Johnson)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

“The Owners” (directed by Julius Berg)
Distributor: RLJE Films
Where to Find It: Various VOD and streaming platforms, plus select theaters

“Robin’s Wish” (directed by Tylor Norwood)
Distributor: Vertical Entertainment
Where to Find It: Various VOD and digital platforms

“A Step Without Feet” (directed by Lydia Schamschula and Jeremy Glaholt)
Distributor: Kandoo Films
Where to Find It: Various VOD and streaming platforms, including iTunes, Amazon, GooglePlay, and Spectrum

Films Available via Virtual Cinema

Learn more about virtual cinemas offerings right here.

Also available this week:

“Beau Trevail” (directed by Claire Denis)
Distributor: Janus Films (special 4K restoration)
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Week of August 24 – August 30

New Films on VOD and Streaming (And in Select Theaters)

As new movies open in theaters during the COVID-19 pandemic, IndieWire will continue to review them whenever possible. We encourage readers to follow the safety precautions provided by CDC and health authorities. Additionally, our coverage will provide alternative viewing options whenever they are available.

“All Together Now” (directed by Brett Haley)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

Based on Matthew Quick’s novel of same name (Quick, Haley, and Marc Basch all contributed to the screenplay), “All Together Now” packs on the drama, layering traumas and complications on Amber until, quite frankly, they feel insurmountable. The film never lets go of its anonymous gloss — even Amber’s high school is idyllic in a way only seen in YA movies — and, despite some horrible twists of fate, it never turns into a Ken Loach drama. That’s not Haley and his seeming belief that even heartbreaking stories can get happy endings, as long as people are nice to each other, is as charming as it is aspirational. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Bill & Ted Face the Music” (directed by Dean Parisot)
Distributor: Orion Pictures
Where to Find It: Various VOD and streaming platforms, including on Amazon PVOD, plus select theaters

The delight of this long-gestating follow-up involves the ironic disconnect at the core of the franchise. Such blinkered stupidity couldn’t possibly save the universe, but there’s a fundamental joy to pretending otherwise. Resurrecting the fantasy of the earlier entries, “Bill & Ted Face the Music” doesn’t devolve into a pure nostalgia play. It’s just another “Bill & Ted” movie — kooky, surreal, and completely adherent to its own playbook. And that’s why, more or less, it works. Even when this fun mess of a movie lacks focus, rushing through cheeky celebrity cameos and half-baked gags, it does so with conviction. It’s a celebration of unfettered ridiculousness that bares its soul. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Centigrade” (directed by Brendan Walsh)
Distributor: IFC Midnight
Where to Find It: Various VOD and streaming platforms, plus select drive-in theaters

Saddled with its uneasy seesaw between expectation and occasional inspiration, “Centigrade” never quite breaks the mold (or, forgive us, the ice). Despite a relatively slim 98 minute running time, it starts running out of steam (running cold? help me!) long before its admittedly quite solid conclusion, trapped in tropes that stop cold (there it is!) any chance the film has to solidify beyond its early, chilling ideas. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Get Duked” (directed by Ninian Doff)
Distributor: Amazon
Where to Find It: Streaming on Amazon Prime Video

“Get Duked!” gets off to an immediately overcaffeinated start, and pretty much maintains that level of energy, as Dean (Rian Gordon), Duncan (Lewis Gribben), and DJ Beatroot (Viraj Juenja) are thrust into participating in the Duke Edinburgh Award. It’s an elaborate, generations-old, morale-building exercise program meant to test their mettle in the outdoors. The trio are eager to run riot in the woods and smoke pot, but their plans are interrupted when they’re saddled with straight-and-narrow, homeschooled introvert Ian (Samuel Bottomley). The boys continue to hatch clever ways to outrun and outsmart their masked would-be assassins, leading to many unexpected bursts of slapstick violence, where hideous deaths like being plowed into a pancake by a large van are played for laughs. A big, bloody ado awaits in the film’s final moments. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Lingua Franca” (directed by Isabel Sandoval)
Distributor: Netflix and ARRAY Releasing
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

“Lingua Franca” illustrates the woefully untapped potential of marginalized storytellers. Though the film is not autobiographical, Sandoval is herself a trans Filpina immigrant. She can take creative risks that would feel unnerving coming from a creator even one circle outside of Olivia’s intersecting identities, and she does. And while Olivia’s choices ensure the film’s conclusion isn’t a joyous one, she remains fully autonomous. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Matthias and Maxime” (directed by Xavier Dolan)
Distributor: MUBI
Where to Find It: Streaming on MUBI

It sounds like the premise of a Duplass brothers movie: Two lifelong dude pals, now approaching their late 20s and heading in very different directions, are convinced to make out as part of someone’s dumb student film; privately, but profoundly, the experience unlocks something at the heart of their friendship. In fact, it was the premise of a Duplass brothers movie (or at least a movie starring a Duplass brother). Nevertheless, there is a world of difference between Lynn Shelton’s “Humpday” and Xavier Dolan’s new “Matthias & Maxime.” It’s a world of difference as clear but crossable as that between male friendship and male intimacy; gay panic and gay desire. Both films compellingly test the electric fence that runs along the parameters of heteronormative behavior, but only Dolan’s embraces the full seriousness of its story prompt. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Personal History of David Copperfield” (directed by Armando Iannucci)
Distributor: Searchlight Pictures
Where to Find It: Select theaters

Armando Iannucci has been the reigning king of filmed satire for years, but with “The Personal History of David Copperfield,” he trades zingy political satire for a messy assemblage of whimsical conceits. On its own terms, Iannucci’s warm-hearted adaptation of the Charles Dickens classic has good intentions to spare, from an inspired color-blind cast led by Dev Patel in top form, to a cascade of playful scene transitions that mimic the kaleidoscopic overview of the Victorian narrator’s bumpy life. But even then, the intermittent charm suffers from the choppiness of Iannucci’s approach, which veers from nuttiness to earnest restraint, as if the filmmaker were at war with his better instincts. Iannucci remains a singular voice, but “David Copperfield” marks his first mixed bag. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Phineas and Ferb the Movie: Candace Against the Universe” (directed by Bob Bowen)
Distributor: Disney+
Where to Find It: Streaming on Disney+

The show was supposedly exhumed from the grave because Disney wanted cross-demographic fodder for its new streaming platform, and even longtime fans may not be able to shake the sense that “Phineas and Ferb the Movie: Candace Against the Universe” reeks of content for content’s sake. But the property itself is such a well-engineered machine — and Marsh and Povenmire have so expertly mastered how to use it — that it’s no surprise the whole contraption still runs smooth (even when they leave it on for a full 90 minutes). It’s more of the same, but more of the same has always been what “Phineas and Ferb” does best. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Rising Phoenix” (directed by Ian Bonhôte and Peter Ettedgui)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

Beginning not least with the cancellation of the Olympic Games in Japan, 2020 has been a year unprecedentedly devoid of sporting events. Though there’s been a slow return to normal there’s still no live audience, stadiums are mostly empty, and many athletes were left to hang up hopes after endless training. Enter “Rising Phoenix,” “McQueen” team Ian Bonhôte and Peter Ettedgui’s skillfully made, moving but never weepy, portrait of the adversities and triumphs faced among the disabled athletes of the Paralympics. While it doesn’t capture the same excitement of a live competition, the filmmakers damn well try, intercutting intelligently art-designed interviews with flashy visual symbolism, ethereal reenactments, and frequently nail-shredding archival footage from Paralympic Games of the past. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“You Cannot Kill David Arquette” (directed by David Darg and Price James)
Distributor: Freestyle Digital Media
Where to Find It: Various VOD platforms

At the beginning of David Darg and Price James’ “You Cannot Kill David Arquette,” its washed up namesake complains that he hasn’t had a successful audition in 10 years. That framing might distort the fact that Arquette remains a working actor (you might have seen him in “Bone Tomahawk,” or the new release “Spree”), but it sets the stage for a documentary that shares professional wrestling’s playful relationship with the truth; James and Darg’s film can’t help but explore how wrestling and cinema both exist within the same liminal space between fiction and reality, even if it does so in a less probing fashion than Robert Greene’s also wonderful “Fake it So Real.” Arquette is searching for a shred of legitimacy in a world that’s always made him feel like a fraud, and by the end of this lovable, hilarious, and ineffably heartfelt doc it’s almost impossible not to believe in him. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Benjamin” (directed by Simon Amstell)
Distributor: Artsploitation Films
Where to Find It: Various VOD and streaming platforms, plus DVD

“Class Action Park” (directed by Chris Charles Scott and Seth Porges)
Distributor: HBO Max
Where to Find It: Streaming on HBO Max

“DieRy” (directed by Jennifer Gelfer)
Distributor: Mailer Tuchman Media
Where to Find It: Various VOD and streaming platforms

“Fatima” (directed by Marco Pontecorvo)
Distributor: Picturehouse
Where to Find It: Various VOD and streaming platforms, plus select theaters

“Hard Kill” (directed by Matt Eskandari)
Distributor: Vertical Entertainment
Where to Find It: Various VOD and streaming platforms

“The New Mutants” (directed by Josh Boone)
Distributor: Disney
Where to Find It: Select theaters

“Rogue” (directed by M.J. Bassett)
Distributor: Lionsgate and Grindstone Entertainment Group
Where to Find It: Various VOD and streaming platforms

“The Silent Natural” (directed by David Risotto)
Distributor: Freestyle Digital Media
Where to Find It: Various VOD and streaming platforms, plus DVD

“Still Here” (directed by Vlad Feier)
Distributor: Blue Fox Entertainment
Where to Find It: Select theaters

Films Available via Virtual Cinema

Learn more about virtual cinemas offerings right here.

“Coronation” (directed by Ai Weiwei)
Distributor: Alamo On Demand
Where to Find It: Rent or purchase through Alamo On Demand

As an installation artist, Ai Weiwei is a larger-than-life character so adept at mocking China’s authoritarian extremes that it led to his exile; behind the camera, that personality recedes to the background. From “Stay Home,” his portrait of HIV struggles in China, to the sprawling look at the refugee crisis in “Human Flow,” Ai treats cinema as a pure humanitarian vessel. That makes him well-equipped for “Coronation,” which has bragging rights as the first documentary feature released about the coronavirus lockdown in China. It casts a wide net: The movie puts a human face on a global health crisis by finding many of them all across this troubled country. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Driven to Abstraction” (directed by Daria Price)
Distributor: Grasshopper Film
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

“Entwined” (directed by Minos Nikolakakis)
Distributor: Dark Star Pictures
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

“Epicentro” (directed by Hubert Sauper)
Distributor: Kino Lorber
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

“House of Cardin” (directed by P. David Ebersole and Todd Hughes)
Distributor: Utopia
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

“Unfit: The Psychology of Donald Trump” (directed by Dan Partland)
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Theatrically Released Films on VOD and Streaming

“The Burnt Orange Heresy” (directed by Giuseppe Capotondi)
Distributor: Sony Pictures Classics
Where to Find It: Various VOD and streaming platforms, plus DVD and Blu-ray

A slinky but inert Euro-thriller that splits the difference between Abbas Kiarostami and François Ozon in a futile effort to forge both of their talents, Giuseppe Capotondi’s “The Burnt Orange Heresy” is a movie about the value of art that offers little in the way of artistic value. What it does have — in spades — is Elizabeth Debicki swanning around the well-monied banks of Lake Como as a mysterious connoisseur whose sultry exterior may (or may not!) hide another meaning under its surface. Read IndieWire’s full review.

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