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New Movies: Release Calendar for November 27, Plus Where to Watch the Latest Films

Staying home? Good. Looking for something new to watch? Even better!

“Happiest Season”

Hulu

Staying home? Good. Looking for something new to watch while you do it? Even better! As the world shifts to accommodate a wide range of in-home viewing options for movie lovers, it’s not just platforms that are expanding, it’s the very type of films they host. There’s more than ever to sift through, and IndieWire is here to help you do just that.

This week’s new releases include streaming originals, fresh VOD offerings, festival favorites, new studio releases now available in the comfort of your own home, and a variety of exciting virtual cinema picks. Browse your options below.

Week of November 23 – 29

New Films on VOD and Streaming (And in Select Theaters)

As new movies open in theaters during the COVID-19 pandemic, IndieWire will continue to review them whenever possible. We encourage readers to follow the safety precautions provided by CDC and health authorities. Additionally, our coverage will provide alternative viewing options whenever they are available.

“Black Beauty” (directed by Ashley Avis)
Distributor: Disney+
Where to Find It: Streaming on Disney+

Like so many beloved children’s classics, the story of “Black Beauty” has always been run through with blunt messaging, tough traumas, and the kind of painful imagery no kid ever really shakes off. Over time, some of those more realistic impulses may be dulled down for wider consumption — the sort of thing Disney has built its animated classics around, woe to the tyke who watches “The Little Mermaid” and then seeks out its source material — but the darker elements that author Anna Sewell oriented her 1877 novel around have mostly endured through countless adaptations. And while the latest, a family-friendly drama from Disney+ and filmmaker Ashley Avis, offers a slightly lightened up take on the material, its enduring lessons and charms hold fast. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Christmas Chronicles 2”

“The Christmas Chronicles 2” (directed by Chris Columbus)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

Yes, it’s important for people to celebrate the blessings they still have and learn to appreciate the ones they might find along the way, but “The Christmas Chronicles 2” — so typical of holiday fare in the streaming era — is more convincing as a reminder that we’re sometimes justified in lamenting what we’ve lost. After all, there’s nothing like a bad Christmas movie about the value of spending quality time with the people you love to make you wish that you’d just done that instead. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Croods: A New Age” (directed by Joel Crawford)
Distributor: Universal Pictures
Where to Find It: Select theaters, with a PVOD release to follow on December 18

Like its predecessor, Joel Crawford’s feature directorial debut offers a familiar story, some classic lessons, and a lot of caveman-centric humor in one inoffensive package. The good stuff is still good: full-throated voice performances from a star-studded cast (Nicolas Cage manages to make his role as a prehistoric dad fit neatly alongside other recent choices in his inscrutable career), a bevy of delightfully weird animals, and the kind of loving messaging that never goes out of style. But there’s also not-so-good stuff, including a straightforward animation style and a story that not only apes the original’s but those of other sequels (plus a plot point that feels weirdly like one that appeared in “Frozen 2”). Read IndieWire’s full review.

“folklore: the long pond studio sessions” (directed by Taylor Swift)
Distributor: Disney+
Where to Find It: Streaming on Disney+

The film brings together Taylor Swift with collaborators Aaron Dessner of The National and Jack Antonoff of Bleachers for the first time in a marooned farmhouse in upstate New York, cozy as an old cardigan. They’d all previously recorded the elements of “Folklore” separately, so it’s charming to see them in the same room — and in a simulacrum of what their process might’ve looked like in a non-pandemic world. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Happiest Season” (directed by Clea DuVall)
Distributor: Hulu
Where to Find It: Streaming on Hulu

The hallmarks of a Christmas movie are by now painfully familiar: Ornate decorations, gift shopping in a generic department store, the pristine but tasteful mini-mansion, the outsider partner eager to impress the family, a large ensemble cast outlined with half-drawn quirks — mostly, if not entirely, white. Entering boldly into this bunch is “Happiest Season,” a shiny holiday comedy which is by all accounts indistinguishable from the rest save for one little detail: It’s gay! Read IndieWire’s full review.

“HIllbilly Elegy”

“Hillbilly Elegy” (directed by Ron Howard)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

Written for the screen by “The Shape of Water” scribe Vanessa Taylor, “Hillbilly Elegy” is — for better or worse — exactly the kind of milquetoast and capital-“E” Empathetic movie you would expect a bunch of Hollywood liberals to make from Vance’s memoir. The source material has been stripped of its libertarian streak (in addition to any other social commentary) and sandblasted into something that more closely resembles a shouty episode of “This Is Us” in both structure and tone than it does a pre-history of the Trump era or a caricature of those who capitalized on it. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Lovers Rock” (directed by Steve McQueen)
Distributor: Amazon Prime Video
Where to Find It: Streaming on Amazon Prime Video

Set across a single night in 1980 and loaded with a soundtrack from the eponymous reggae music, “Lovers Rock” is a paean to an energized youth culture taking control of its surroundings, despite the social unrest around them. Experienced on its own terms, this delightful snapshot of boozy dance-floor seduction plays like an artist unleashing years of repressed good vibes by applying his lyrical style to pure, unbridled bliss for almost the entirety of its 68 minutes. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Lovers Rock”

“Shawn Mendes: In Wonder” (directed by Grant Singer)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

Filmed before the mayhem of 2020, “In Wonder” sometimes comes across as utopian to the point of being tone-deaf. It’s skin-deep access, pushing viewers up against the glossy outsides of the bubble of someone who earned $38 million in 2019 alone. Grant Singer’s film is more an extended promotional reel than the anatomy of an artist, and that lack of depth and disarmament feels just a bit out of step at the end of a humbling year for celebrities. Or, it’s crashing relief for people who just want to feel better. Take your pick. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Stardust” (directed by Gabriel Range)
Distributor: IFC Films
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus VOD and various digital platforms

It’s understandable that audiences might expect Gabriel Range’s “Stardust” (written alongside newbie screenwriter Christopher Bell) to color a bit more outside the lines of the traditional rock biopic. And while there are flashes of originality in the film’s script which quite artfully builds on David Bowie’s worries with a distinctly personal edge most of it is relatively straightforward, never as psychedelic or sophisticated as its opening shot, which finds Flynn stuck in spacesuit and unable to engage with the world around him. Johnny Flynn is tasked with a series of tricky balances as his Bowie moves between personas and pains with a regularity that might induce whiplash without such a steady performance to guide them. It’s a graceful, winning performance at its best when Flynn is allowed to go really wild something the film remains oddly timid about embracing as a whole. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Superintelligence” (directed by Ben Falcone)
Distributor: HBO Max
Where to Find It: Streaming on HBO Max

And faster than you can say, “Alexa, show me a piece of streaming content that crystallizes the grim future of feature-length comedies that have to satisfy an algorithm but not a theatrical audience,” you’re watching a lifeless, laugh-free slab of nothing like “Superintelligence,” which starts with “what if Skynet, but with jokes?” and then just gasps for air for the next 105 minutes. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Superintelligence”

“Uncle Frank” (directed by Alan Ball)
Distributor: Amazon Prime Video
Where to Find It: Streaming on Amazon Prime Video

The drive itself is breezy enough, and the chemistry between the characters in that car is able to fuel the movie all the way to South Carolina as they swerve around routine homophobia like potholes in the highway. And yet, there are already signs that Alan Ball’s script might struggle to thread the needle between its natural light-footedness and the melodrama that savvy audiences can all see coming down the road. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Zappa” (directed by Alex Winter)
Distributor: Magnolia Pictures
Where to Find It: VOD and various digital platforms

All the standard intel is here, augmented with enough never-before-seen footage to bring it back to life. Zappa’s childhood, his first experiences with playing live music — highlighted by a look at his time in The Blackouts, a mixed-race ensemble that helped Zappa acquire his taste for spitting in the face of white American “decency” — and his rise to fame with the Mothers of Invention are all laid out in a frenzied slipstream of biographical facts. Efforts to visualize Zappa’s combustible love for cultural synthesis (e.g. clips from old “Godzilla” movies and stock footage from hokey industrial films) add little texture to this look inside the life of the mind, but it’s hard to fault Alex Winter for trying. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“32 Weeks” (directed by Brian Cavallaro)
Distributor: Indie Rights
Where to Find It: Various digital platforms

“Buddy Games” (directed by Josh Duhamel)
Distributor: Saban Films, Paramount Pictures
Where to Find It: VOD and various digital platforms

“Getting to Know You” (directed by Joan Carr-Wiggin)
Distributor: Gravitas Ventures
Where to Find It: Various digital platforms

“Last Call” (directed by Steven Bernstein)
Distributor: K Street Pictures
Where to Find It: Select theaters

Check out more information about the rest of November’s new releases below.

Week of November 16 – 22

New Films on VOD and Streaming (And in Select Theaters)

As new movies open in theaters during the COVID-19 pandemic, IndieWire will continue to review them whenever possible. We encourage readers to follow the safety precautions provided by CDC and health authorities. Additionally, our coverage will provide alternative viewing options whenever they are available.

“Collective” (directed by Alexander Nanau)
Distributor: Magnolia Pictures
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus VOD and various digital platforms

“Collective” starts as one of the greatest journalism movies of all times, and then it goes one step further, exposing democracy at war with itself. Romanian director Alexander Nanau’s bracing, relentless documentary tracks the aftermath of the 2015 fire that killed 64 people, hovering at the center of a system on the verge of collapse. And then it does, much like the flames that engulfed Bucharest’s Colectiv nightclub and sent the nation into a tailspin, as “Collective” sits at the center of the chaos with an unflinching gaze. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Girl” (directed by Chad Faust)
Distributor: Screen Media Films
Where to Find It: Select theaters, VOD next week

Struck in a downtrodden small town where everyone seems interested in what she’s up to, from the creepy Sheriff (Mickey Rourke) to the even creepier “Charmer” (Chad Faust himself) and the potentially helpful Barkeep (Glen Gould), Girl (Bella Thorne) embarks on a quest to figure out who killed her father and why, a desire fueled by equal parts anger and odd curiosity. The film’s predictable plotting is delivered via a nearly lethal combination of obvious twists and a series of face-offs that would be compelling, if not for the exposition-heavy conversations that take place in between the physical brutality. Still, the themes of the film — the corrosive pain of poverty and intergenerational trauma, the seeming impossibility of breaking the cycle of abuse — are heady enough to keep it from succumbing to its worst impulses, and Faust’s unflinching grasp on the material never feels pandering. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Jiu Jitsu” (directed by Dimitri Logothetis)
Distributor: The Avenue
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus VOD and various digital platforms

It’s not the worst idea in sci-fi B-movie history: a ruthless alien race, that also happen to be experts in the martial arts, invade the planet every half-dozen years to battle its most exceptional warriors. The fate of mankind is at stake, but in “Jiu Jitsu,” writer-director Dimitri Logothetis (“Kickboxer: Retaliation”) makes the absolute least of a promising concept. Shamelessly cribbing from the original “Predator” (1987), “Mortal Kombat” (1992), and “The Bourne Identity” (2002), the movie’s sole bright spot is Nicolas Cage’s sprightly turn as a Yoda-like sage, but the Crazy Cage factor can’t save this silly mess of half-baked ideas. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Mangrove” (directed by Steve McQueen)
Distributor: Amazon Prime Video
Where to Find It: Streaming on Amazon Prime Video

Produced as part of the filmmaker’s ambitious five-film “Small Axe” anthology about Black British Londoners across several decades, “Mangrove” is a taut and thrilling judicial drama that transcends the genre even while acknowledging its barriers. Just as he used the heist genre as a Trojan horse for sociopolitical concerns, Steve McQueen turns the courtroom formula inside out. In following the trial, “Mangrove” delves into the usual assemblage of passionate monologues about equal rights and dedication to the cause. But it’s also grounded in a detailed ecosystem so rich with the sentiments of the moment that it eventually makes an old routine feel new. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Run” (directed by Aneesh Chaganty)
Distributor: Hulu
Where to Find It: Streaming on Hulu

Having a mother is a scary thing in “Run,” Aneesh Chaganty’s slick thriller starring a deranged Sarah Paulson as the domineering single parent of a chronically unwell young woman played by Kiera Allen. Clearly inspired by the millennium-defining Munchausen by proxy case of all — that of Gypsy Rose Blanchard — “Run” has more in common with “What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?” than Hitchcock, operating at the clip of a runaway train. You think, What the hell am I watching? And you wouldn’t be wrong, as “Run” is so berserk, and so tonally schizophrenic, it’s hard to read it either seriously, or as garish camp. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Sound of Metal” (directed by Darius Marder)
Distributor: Amazon Prime Video
Where to Find It: Select theaters, starts streaming on Amazon Prime Video on December 4

Riz Ahmed is the sort of frantic screen actor who always looks like he might jut out of the frame, and in “Sound of Metal,” he’s trapped. As Ruben, the heavy-metal drummer going deaf at the center of the mesmerizing debut from writer-director Darius Marder, Ahmed conveys the complex frustrations of losing touch with the world around him no matter how much he fights to hold onto it. This devastating conundrum relies on the best use of sound design in recent memory, as Marder immerses viewers within the confines of Ruben’s deteriorating relationship to the world around him, and he sorts through the wreckage to construct a new one. Ahmed’s brilliant performance coasts on a complex soundscape that resonates even in total silence. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Embattled” (directed by Nick Sarkisov)
Distributor: IFC Films
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus VOD and various digital platforms

“Hearts and Bones” (directed by Ben Lawrence)
Distributor: Gravitas Ventures
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus VOD and various digital platforms

“The Last Vermeer” (directed by Dan Friedkin)
Distributor:
Tri-Star Pictures
Where to Find It:
Select theaters

“Noemí Gold” (directed by Dan Rubenstein)
Distributor: Topic Studios
Where to Find It: Topic Studios’ streaming page

“Team Marco” (directed by Julio Vincent Gambuto)
Distributor: Samuel Goldwyn
Where to Find It: VOD and various digital platforms, plus virtual cinema options

Films Available via Virtual Cinema

Learn more about virtual cinemas offerings right here.

“The Twentieth Century” (directed by Matthew Rankin)
Distributor: Oscilloscope
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Indebted to Guy Maddin, German Expressionism, and Elaine May all at once, “The Twentieth Century” resolves as a mega-silly but oddly sincere caricature of a nation’s cuckolded spirit. Whereas even the most revisionist takes on American history are shaped by a myopic sense of divine importance and the dick-measuring that tends to come with it, director Matthew Rankin’s leaky snow globe of a movie leans on Canada’s pathological fixation with being second-best; with “simping,” being friend-zoned, and elevating its reputation for polite submission into something that almost seems patriotic if you squint hard enough. “Canada is just one failed orgasm after another,” someone laments towards the end of this unclassifiable wonder, but there’s something to be said for impotence after watching an(other) American president fuck the entire world. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Koshien: Japan’s Field of Dreams” (directed by Ema Ryan Yamazaki)
Distributor: First Run Features
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Week of November 9 – 15

New Films on VOD and Streaming (And in Select Theaters)

As new movies open in theaters during the COVID-19 pandemic, IndieWire will continue to review them whenever possible. We encourage readers to follow the safety precautions provided by CDC and health authorities. Additionally, our coverage will provide alternative viewing options whenever they are available.

“Ammonite” (directed by Francis Lee)
Distributor: Neon
Where to Find It: Select theaters, PVOD in coming weeks

A film about the kind of people who spend their lives searching out the giant ribbed and spiraled fossils of the extinct underwater mollusks and the kind of people trapped in shells of their own making. In Francis Lee’s “Ammonite,” those people are one and the same, care of fictitious spins on Mary (Kate Winslet) and her geologist friend Charlotte Murchison (Saoirse Ronan). The result is a chilly, detached romance between the two women that never catches fire, a film about restrained people that itself is so buttoned-up as to be impenetrable. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Chick Fight” (directed by Paul Leyden)
Distributor: Quiver Distribution
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus VOD and various digital platforms

“What if we made [iname of popular movie here] but for [a different audience than said first film]?” is a classic Hollywood formula, and while Paul Leyden’s “Chick Fight” is built on the somewhat shoddy assumption that David Fincher’s “Fight Club” wasn’t really for the ladies, crafting a feel-good comedy around a bunch of gals who start their own underground boxing group isn’t a bad idea. Neither is producer-star Malin Akerman, an actress who brings relentless energy and enthusiasm to even the most anemic features. And while the premise of “Chick Fight” may be featherweight, it’s the film’s phony feminist execution that turns it into a real loser. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Climb” (directed by Michael Covino)
Distributor: Sony Pictures Classics
Where to Find It: Select theaters

The premise of “The Climb” has been told so many times it’s a small miracle that this one works at all: Two lifelong buddies test the boundaries of their friendship when a woman comes between them. Yet Michael Covino’s absorbing directorial debut confronts that challenge with stunning cinematic ambition, resulting in a brilliant reinvention of the buddy comedy. Testosterone-fueled dude movies have occupied every facet of the filmmaking landscape in recent years, from the Duplass brothers to “Step Brothers,” but “The Climb” transforms that trope into a fresh vision of boozy showdowns and awkward laments, resulting in a winning tragicomic vision of its own design. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Dreamland” (directed by Miles Joris-Peyrafitte)
Distributor: Paramount Pictures
Where to Find It: Select theaters, PVOD in coming weeks

A Depression-era coming-of-age story that’s told with all the born-to-run romance of a Bruce Springsteen anthem, Miles Joris-Peyrafitte’s “Dreamland” is a film as mythic and familiar as the Dust Bowl itself. It’s an arresting fable fueled by the restlessness that American kids have always regarded as a birthright, and a penniless runaway of a movie that’s almost too beautiful to care that it’s racing towards a dead end. You’ve seen this story a thousand times before, but Joris-Peyrafitte’s expressive direction and Margot Robbie’s sheer force of will are enough to endow the movie’s best moments with the same hope-and-a-prayer immediacy that its heroes take with them as they speed towards the southern border. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Fatman” (directed by Eshom and Ian Nelms)
Distributor: Saban Films
Where to Find It: Select theaters, PVOD in coming weeks

Brace for this: “Fatman” is a Christmas-themed comic thriller starring Mel Gibson as a gritty, despondent, cash-strapped Chris Cringle who — at the height of the holiday season — has to negotiate a hostile takeover from the U.S. military while fending off a hellbent assassin (Walton Goggins) hired by some bratty rich kid who’s pissed off that he got coal in his stocking the previous year. It’s 100 minutes long, it combines the crude yuletide spirit of “Bad Santa” with the dour seriousness of a Zack Snyder movie, and it climaxes with a mass shooting at the North Pole. End of review. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Freaky” (directed by Christopher Landon)
Distributor: Universal Pictures
Where to Find It: Select theaters

A blood-spattered twist on the “Freaky Friday” mythos that dares ask, “Hey, what if you were a nice high school kid who ended up switching bodies with a psychotic serial killer who looks like Vince Vaughn?,” the film is bolstered by go-for-broke performances from Vaughn and Kathryn Newton, as well as Christoper Landon’s sharp humor (and sharper kills). Read IndieWire’s full review.

“I Am Greta” (directed by Nathan Grossman
Distributor: Hulu
Where to Find It: Streaming on Hulu

Nathan Grossman’s film, an intimate outing that spends significant time alongside both Greta Thunberg and her family over the course of 2018 and 2019, follows Thunberg throughout a time of great personal upheaval as she embarks on a rocky road to becoming a public icon. In its quietest moments, it finds the very real person underneath the public activist, an inside look that shows how dedicated Thunberg is to her ideals. She wants a better world for everyone, and as she begins to understand the cost of saying such an idea out loud, the film grows both more unnerving and rich. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Jingle Jangle” (directed by David E. Talbert)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

At the start of David E. Talbert’s delightful “Jingle Jangle: A Christmas Journey,” narrator Phylicia Rashad promises to unveil a “new story” to her cute grandkids, big holiday fans who are a bit worn out by the classics. While the shape of what follows is familiar enough — it wouldn’t be a holiday tale if it didn’t hinge on the literal power of believing in something — Talbert and his stacked cast find all sorts of fresh dimensions to liven up this joyous musical, from an admirable obsession with human intelligence to an unbridled enthusiasm for the power of the young. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Life Ahead” (directed by Edoardo Ponti)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

On paper, “The Life Ahead” sounds like sentimental mush — orphaned immigrant kid gets rescued from a tortuous life of crime by the maternal Holocaust survivor and former prostitute who takes him in. And make no mistake: Director Edoardo Ponti, who directs his mother Sophia Loren as said survivor opposite newcomer Ibrahima Gueye as the immigrant child in question, certainly has made that kind of movie. But with its formidable odd couple at the center and Ponti’s alternately slick and sensitive direction, “The Life Ahead” manages to make the case for its hackneyed setup in real time. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Monsoon” (directed by Hong Khaou)
Distributor: Strand Releasing
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus VOD and various virtual cinema options

British-Malaysian actor Henry Golding has carved a space in Hollywood as a debonair heartthrob who can bring old world charm to contemporary mainstream movies. From his turn as a moneyed groom-to-be in the 2018 smash “Crazy Rich Asians” to his Hitchcockian matinee idol in “A Simple Favor” that same year, Golding brings a measure of class to every project he graces. And, with just a handful of screen credits, there haven’t been many. In Hong Khaou’s lovely, lilting “Monsoon,” Golding emerges from upstart Hollywood stardom as a calm, but still cool, and compelling dramatic lead. It’s hard to take your eyes off him, and that’s not just because he’s in nearly every shot of this slice of gay soul searching as an expat returning to his roots in Vietnam. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Come Away” (directed by Brenda Chapman)
Distributor: Relativity Media
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus VOD and various digital platforms

“Dating Amber” (directed by David Freyne)
Distributor: Samuel Goldwyn Films
Where to Find It: VOD and various digital platforms

“Echo Boomers” (directed by Seth Savoy)
Distributor: Saban Films
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus VOD and various digital platforms

“Make Up” (directed by Claire Oakley)
Distributor: Mutiny Pictures
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various virtual cinema options

“Where She Lies” (directed by Zach Marion)
Distributor: Gravitas Ventures
Where to Find It: VOD and various digital platforms

Films Available via Virtual Cinema

Learn more about virtual cinemas offerings right here.

“Divine Love” (directed by Gabriel Mascaro)
Distributor: Outsider Pictures
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Brazilian director Gabriel Mascaro excels at digging inside distinctive worlds and transforming them into poetry. His first two narrative features, “Neon Bull” and “August Wind” are lyrically transcendent works that blur the lines between reality and fiction. That makes the premise of his latest effort a welcome surprise: While “Neon Bull” depicted nomadic rodeo performers and “August Winds” reveled in the romance of a remote fishing village, “Divine Love” is an allegorical sci-fi story set in the near future. Nevertheless, Mascaro and cinematographer Diego García have crafted a lush, intricate sociopolitical commentary that builds on the filmmaker’s inquisitive approach even as it sometimes overextends its ambition. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Dirty God” (directed by Sacha Polak)
Distributor: Dark Star Pictures
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

“Queen of Hearts: Audrey Flack” (directed by Deborah Shaffer)
Distributor: Film Movement
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Week of November 2 – 8

New Films on VOD and Streaming (And in Select Theaters)

As new movies open in theaters during the COVID-19 pandemic, IndieWire will continue to review them whenever possible. We encourage readers to follow the safety precautions provided by CDC and health authorities. Additionally, our coverage will provide alternative viewing options whenever they are available.

“The Dark and the Wicked” (directed by Bryan Bertino)
Distributor: RLJE Films, Shudder
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus VOD and various digital platforms

“She told us not to come.” Such is the refrain of Bryan Bertino’s “The Dark and the Wicked” or, at least, of his two main characters, siblings stuck in a house of horrors that they really, really shouldn’t have returned to. No, they shouldn’t have come, but Bertino’s striking opening act makes a fine argument for why they did, while creepily teasing why it’s going to end so very badly for them. Still, despite a strong start, Bertino’s grim and gruesome “The Dark and the Wicked” never coalesces into anything more than a collection of chilling images and a paper-thin logic. That doesn’t stop star Marin Ireland from doing her damndest to pull it all together, as her performance alone teases a more effective film, one in which the shaky bridge between its religious-tinged trauma and very human grief transforms into something with real power. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Kindred” (directed by Joe Marcantonio)
Distributor: IFC Midnight
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus VOD and various digital platforms

In his elegant and unsettling feature directorial debut, “Kindred” director Joe Marcantonio (who wrote the film’s script with Jason McColgan, also making his feature debut) lays out an intricate, if familiar gaslighting scenario that still has plenty of fresh drama to mine. After an unforeseen tragedy takes Ben, Charlotte (Tamara Lawrance) — still pregnant, still unnerved by it — is hustled off to Margaret’s (Fiona Shaw) sprawling country estate, where both the matriarch of the fractured family and her groveling stepson vow to take care of Charlotte until she can deliver them an unexpected heir. So far, so scary, and it will only get creepier from there. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Jungleland” (directed by Max Winkler)
Distributor: Paramount
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus VOD and various digital platforms next week

Bruce Springsteen’s “Jungleland” isn’t actually heard at any point in Max Winkler’s hardscrabble new boxing drama of the same name (even if the Boss still manages to carry most of the emotional payload in the film’s stirring final scene), but simply referencing that epic song about the inescapable beauty of blue-collar life is enough to set the tone. This isn’t just a movie about the sort of hardscrabble Americans who dream themselves to death every day in this country, it’s also — at least to some extent — a swift and punchy Springsteenian meditation on the mythic nature of those dreams, and how they can harden into cliché if left dangling in the night air for too long. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Let Him Go” (directed by Thomas Bezucha)
Distributor: Focus Features
Where to Find It: Select theaters

Adapted from the Larry Watson novel of the same name, this terse and simple Western thriller casts Kevin Costner and Dine Lane as a retired couple in early ’60s Montana whose marriage is tested at a time when America’s aspirational self-image is about to be undone by the tribalism of its design. Here is a tanned hide of a movie about the violence that results from conflicting ideas of what this country should be, and while the writer/director of “The Family Stone” lacks the chops to tell this story with the suspense it demands (or the hard-nosed focus required to mine something new from the myth it deconstructs), he fully understands the symbolic power of seeing these actors lose something they can never get back. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Proxima” (directed by Alice Winocour)
Distributor: Vertical Entertainment
Where to Find It: VOD and various digital platforms

A year after it debuted on the festival circuit, Alice Winocour’s cerebral space drama “Proxima” was beaten into wide(ish) release by Netflix’s significantly less brain-powered “Away,” which arrived on the streamer this past September, where it was greeted with iffy reviews and a surprisingly prompt cancellation from Netflix. While the central conceit of “Proxima” and “Away” is similar — a female astronaut struggles to balance her profession and her family — Winocour’s intimate, considered treatment of the material is far more satisfying, less a space-y soap than a nuanced character study, bolstered by a wonderful turn from star Eva Green. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Citation” (directed by Kunle Afolayan)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

“The Endless Trench” (directed by Jon Garaño, Aitor Arregi, and Jose Mari Goenaga)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

“Higher Love” (directed by Hasan Oswald)
Distributor: Gravitas Ventures
Where to Find It: VOD and various digital platforms

“The Informer” (directed by Stephen and Alexa Kinigopoulos)
Distributor: Vertical Entertainment
Where to Find It: Premium VOD

“Mother” (directed by Tatsushi Ohmori)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

“My Dad’s Christmas Date” (directed by Mick Davis)
Distributor: Gravitas Ventures
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus VOD and various digital platforms

“Operation Christmas Drop” (directed by Martin Wood)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

“Triggered” (directed by Alastair Orr)
Distributor: Samuel Goldwyn Films
Where to Find It: VOD and various digital platforms

“True to the Game 2” (directed by Jamal Hill)
Distributor: Imani Media Group
Where to Find It: Select theaters

“Writer’s Block” (directed by Ray Spivey and Jeff Kerr)
Distributor: Gravitas Ventures
Where to Find It: VOD and various digital platforms

Films Available via Virtual Cinema

Learn more about virtual cinemas offerings right here.

“18 to Party” (directed by Jeff Roda)
Distributor: Asterion Pictures
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema here or here

“Koko-di Koko-da” (directed by Johannes Nyholm)
Distributor: Dark Star Pictures
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Check out more information about the rest of the year’s newest releases on the next page.

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